#1
Edit: I worded this badly :p I'm handling the acquisition of studio equipment for a startup and we are trying to figure out how much business might be lost as a result of going with electronic drums. Seeing as going with electronic drums to save on soundproofing would also mean going with direct input recording of guitars, I'm thinking the soundproofing is probably worth the coin, but I'm tempted to stick with direct input recording while we are starting out to minimize the purchase of assets that aren't recoverable on the used market.
Last edited by Mkjms at Feb 5, 2017,
#2
If the project is super important I'd find another studio, though I may at least try the electronic drums. If you've never played electric drums before just the feel of them could take a while to adjust to.

I own a 7 piece Tama kit and a Roland TD9. Recording with electronic drums can sound great or shit depending on the situation.

I'm afraid I have no simple answer. You shouldn't be uncomfortable if you're paying money.
#3
chaosinsues5

Should have worded this differently, as it makes it sound like I am reluctant to record at a specific studio when I am actually just suggesting a hypothetical, see my edited first post.
#4
In my opinion, the first drummer that comes through the door will not be happy.
Using someone else's kit is oftentimes frowned up by drummers, but using the studio drums is often expected at some studios. Some drummers will insist on using their own...it can be a messy situation that requires someone to totally give in to something they do not want to. But, this is speaking of acoustic drums...

...electronic drums are nothing like acoustic drums in many aspects. To someone who's never used electronic drums you're REALLY expecting a lot from most guys to make the adjustment from acoustic to electronic.

In my opinion, it would be a HUGE mistake not having/allowing acoustic drums. You only need a booth big enough to fit the drums, so soundproofing could be done quite cheaply. 8x8 would be big enough for a standard 5 piece house kit. Set 'em up, mic 'em, leave 'em there. Therein lies another problem: only 5 pieces may bother a lot of guys, but many could make it work.
Last edited by chaosinsues5 at Feb 5, 2017,
#5
If you're serious about starting a studio project the soundproofing is essential, if the room sounds terrible it doesn't matter what kit is inside it.
#6
If you're looking at a professional setup, you want acoustic drums. They have more dynamics and are much more natural than electronic drums and they also can be played like a real drumkit. 

You'll also get a better sound out of a well-miced drumkit than a VST. Of course, this totally depends on how skilled you are with micing up drums, etc. 

While most of this holds true for "professional" setups, I have a home studio in which I make use of an electronic drumkit to lay down tracks. Guitars run through my Kemper or a VST direct into the DAW and I have enough inputs to record multiple instruments simultaneously. 

Works really well for band practice too, we all wear headphones, so everyone can hear everything, and the volume is low enough that the neighbours don't complain. 

But if I wanted to record something seriously, I would really recommend going to a professional studio with a real drum kit. 
#7
I'm afraid that you *have* to set up an acoustic drum room. 

Note that this doesn't have to be in the main recording area; you just have to have enough room for the drumset and for a body to get around and place mikes.

Some drummers will bitch and moan for days if they have to play electronic drums. It's almost like listening to the "but toobs..." guitarist contingent. But the business about acoustic drumkits having more dynamics, etc. is mostly balderdash. Most drummers will work just fine with electronic triggers on their own drumset and will delight in having the ability to completely change the sound. If you quietly pull their acoustic drums out, put the headsets on them, the only thing they'll usually whine about are the fake cymbals. 

The plain fact is, a WHOLE lot of recording is being done with electronic drums and (more significantly) drum machines with no drummer present at all. And it's that last part that they should be concerned about. 
#8
Quote by Mkjms
Edit: I worded this badly :p I'm handling the acquisition of studio equipment for a startup and we are trying to figure out how much business might be lost as a result of going with electronic drums. Seeing as going with electronic drums to save on soundproofing would also mean going with direct input recording of guitars, I'm thinking the soundproofing is probably worth the coin, but I'm tempted to stick with direct input recording while we are starting out to minimize the purchase of assets that aren't recoverable on the used market.

This studio is already going broke before it's first recording.  Get out now!  Musicians choose to work in a pro studio because of the expertise, experience, and ability to capture a sound that they cannot do at home with a Mac and a DAW.  Currently you offer nothing of value that they cannot do at home.

You need someone with experience and vision that understands this business and currently you don't have that.  The golden rule applies here: Whoever is putting up the $$ makes the rules.  As a professional studio that means it is the client's choice how they wish to be recorded, not yours.  If they choose to go direct or use electronic drums, excellent!  If they choose to use their DW touring kit and Marshall 100w at full song, you need to be able to work with that, not the other way around.  Get a clue Mkjms or there will be a fire sale shortly for "barely used recording gear 10 cents on the dollar". 
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at May 14, 2017,
#9
I would record with electronic drums but a lot of drummers either won't because they are purists or can't because they feel different and it messes up their rhythm.  If you want a successful studio you should be able to accommodate all drummers.  You don't need a house kit but you do need a sound proofed room and the mics to record acoustic drums.  You also need to know how to make the acoustic drum sound good when recording.  Recording drums isn't easy so you need to know how to make acoustic drums sound good too.
Not taking any online orders.
Last edited by CorduroyEW at May 17, 2017,