#1
Hi guys.

I don't even know why I'm asking this question given that I've been stringing my guitar like this for over a year now, but...

I just never could be bothered to get multiple winds around the tuner. Coercing the string to stay in its place and wind several times seemed too much. Snapped a string once trying to do that, decided that if it isn't broken, might as well not try to fix it.

I get one wind around the thing at most, and sometimes none for the low E string.


I usually cut the string off closer to the peg, this was a hurried job.
This doesn't cause me any trouble as far as I've seen. Bends are fine, strings stay in tune, they last a good long while. I just want to make sure this won't cause any trouble down the line, so - will it?
Last edited by Spinnerweb at Feb 5, 2017,
#2
In all honesty, I'm very surprised that your strings don't keep slipping out of the tuning posts like that, but if it's working for you then I can't argue with the results

For what it's worth, this is how locking tuners are designed to be strung up, because the locking mechanism holds the string place securely without the need for those extra layers of winding around the tuning posts which normally exist solely to secure the strings to the posts. provided the strings don't slip (they can't, with a good locking mechanism), fewer windings is actually good for tuning stability and makes the strings take a lot less time to 'settle in' under tension so you get fewer tuning problems on a fresh set of strings.
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#3
Quote by Blompcube
In all honesty, I'm very surprised that your strings don't keep slipping out of the tuning posts like that, but if it's working for you then I can't argue with the results

For what it's worth, this is how locking tuners are designed to be strung up, because the locking mechanism holds the string place securely without the need for those extra layers of winding around the tuning posts which normally exist solely to secure the strings to the posts. provided the strings don't slip (they can't, with a good locking mechanism), fewer windings is actually good for tuning stability and makes the strings take a lot less time to 'settle in' under tension so you get fewer tuning problems on a fresh set of strings.


Ah, thanks for the assurance

And yep, they don't slip out. I once cut off my high E string by bending it between my fingers and it actually broke off within the hole and I was like, "Aw hell, it's wasted now." But it ended up staying, in tune, and did its job and didn't ever break -I only changed it when the D string broke and I changed the whole set.

I love my Washburn
Last edited by Spinnerweb at Feb 5, 2017,
#4
I've been doing it like that since I snapped my first string and I've had no problems at all.