#1
I'm hoping to get an idea of of the general preference when recording electric guitars. Do you prefer a Mic'd amp in the studio for an authentic analog recording, or has direct input come along enough to be feasible for a good tone? I know it will often come down to personal preference, but I'm curious how many guitarists these days take the purist route vs digital.
If you primarily record the amps via mic's, what's your volume preference?
#2
Depends on the music:
Metal (old style) - mic and cab on max volume
Metal (new styles) - all in the computer
Rock - mic and cab on high volume
etc.

These days, the digital method is so good that it is difficult to decide...
Last edited by PSimonR at Feb 5, 2017,
#3
Quote by PSimonR
Depends on the music:
Metal (old style) - mic and cab on max volume
Metal (new styles) - all in the computer
Rock - mic and cab on high volume
etc.


That would be max input volume before clipping? I'm just familiarizing myself with instrument mics like the Sm57, but I'm guessing you would saturate the mic long before reaching max volume on an average sized cab? Is their any chance of damaging these mics via too much input?
#4
Quote by Mkjms
That would be max input volume before clipping? I'm just familiarizing myself with instrument mics like the Sm57, but I'm guessing you would saturate the mic long before reaching max volume on an average sized cab? Is their any chance of damaging these mics via too much input?


By max volume I mean turned up really loud, to get the power amp sucking down it's power supply and the speaker(s) and cab providing their distortion as well as any from over-driving the pre-amp. Classically (70's) a Marshall 50 Master Volume and a 4x12.

SM57 can take anything a 30W guitar speaker in a 120W 4x12 can through at it. They do not saturate or get damaged. This is why (well one of the reasons) they are used as PA inputs from backine amps as well as in the studio.
#5
Even in pro studios with pro bands, I think it is a case of whatever gets you home these days. It could be DI with amp modelling, it could be throwing mics in front of speakers. It could be a combination.

In the end, nobody will ever know how you got there unless you tell them. If it sounds good, it IS good, even if you did it "wrong." As a friend of mine likes to say, "the tape can't see your tattoos."

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Here is an article that talks about Pete Lesperance from Harem Scarem (kiiiiiler player.... if you don't know who he is... wow....) and how he recorded all the guitars for a re-issue of their "Mood Swings" album using an Axe-FX-II. All of them. There is a better video that shows him explaining it all and demonstrating it all, but I can't find it.

https://forum.fractalaudio.com/threads/welcome-pete-lesperance-from-harem-scarem-to-our-family-of-artists.90836/

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Totally depends on the sound you want. Johnny A records direct into the board (at least he did on his first few albums) and I have never heard a better clean guitar tone. On his studio stuff recordings it's his signature Johnny A Gibson then when I saw him play with The Yardbirds he played a Les Paul through a Marshal. It all depends on the sound you are looking for on each song There is no one single answer.

Just in case you are not familiar with Johnny A:


Same guy same guitar playing outside direct to a mixer.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Feb 6, 2017,
#8
I recorded a Hughes and Kettner tri amp MK II with a Marshall 1960 4x12 cab the other day. Pure gold. VST's have come a long way but damn, nothing compares to the real thing.
Quote by lol2theworld
I was about to diss kornflipsk8er, but then i realized hes an 03er and im an 09er.
I am inferior to him.


Quote by metalh3ad88
I am fairly certain that kornflipsk8er is GOD!!!11!!!!1!!
#9
I record direct and an amp sound at the same time.

I like recording with an amp because I like the feel and response characteristics of tube amps. But I'll generally use the direct signal and reamp it sometimes through hardware or software modellers. Generally I'll use my amps if they get the sound I want though.

Generally I like to record loud - especially distorted sounds and leads, because the volume vibrates the strings, increasing sustain and changing the feel a bit, but it's not essential. It also depends on the amp used and how it can achieve the tone you want.

In a full mix most people won't be able to tell if it's modelling or not, so if it sounds good it is good.
RIP Gooze

cats
#10
Anything that you want to end up professionally mixed and mastered goes thru a mic, at least in my studio.
There are some clean sounds that every once in a while sneak in thru a modeler and a lead sound now and then, but for the most part I record direct and reamp later, maybe due to the fact that I am the engineer and the guitarist so trying to wear one hat at a time.
I'd say always do a safety track and if you want to experiment with in the box solutions, you have your safety track.

My preferred method in a recording studio when I am using their in house engineer during tracking is a multimic approach. I combine few mics that I've known to work good together. If I have a chance to do a 3 track of my guitar, SM57 or e835 combined with MD421 (or e609 or e906 if the drummer hogs the MD421s) or a Royer ribbon on the same spot pretty much standard on the grille. I usually do about an inch or two away from the horn to the side, maybe an inch away farther from the grille. Then I like to mix in a 3rd mic, usually a condenser, which I play around with, about a foot maybe facing same speaker, sometimes on the grille like the others on different speaker. Something like AT4040, Neumann U87, Groove tubes, Oktava, etc. My go to for this is the AT4040. I like to run the dynamics thru a nice analog chain (tube pre, tube comp, tube eq or tube vocal channel, sometimes solid state with optocomp) before hitting tape. Something like UA-610 can provide a little nice analog hair to the signal, especially the SM57 could be distorted a touch going on the way in and you get some harmonics to ring out better and could use less gain on the guitar amp.

If the studio has a natural reverb chamber you'd be in luck as you can use that to marry the whole production sound as no convolution or fake reverb will. These studios are hard to find though...Abbey Road is one, unless they also closed?

I've been known to go nuts and experiment, especially on lead guitar sounds. I've stuck guitar stacks toward reflective corners, miked each corner for early reflections reverb, even made some room tunnels like a speaker horns, looking like this \ / from gobos and I've recorded stereo pair high end condensers for natural room reverb from several feet away. It really depends on the budget...

Some people use reamping services...latest Vektor album did that and sounds fantastic.

Always save a DI safety track in case you need to reamp as something doesn't sound right in the mix.