#1
I seen Tony mention a lot, I am must naive on the subject but some one kindly explain what that statement means? I know in some countries Cedar is endangered but not in others. I just want to understand what is mean by misuse of Cedar cause I have heard a few good Takamines Cedar tops and kinda want one.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
Last edited by Blackwaterson89 at Feb 5, 2017,
#2
This is news to me, but admittedly I don't keep up with conservation or the acquisition process for tonewoods.
My God, it's full of stars!
#3
Nah, its nothing to do with conservation, it has to do with the fact that you can't see grain runout in cedar, so you can't tell if a top is well-cut or not. I've seen one damaged Takamine with a broken top, where the grain had run out over a distance of about 2" over the thickness of the top. - Not good. Also, Tak have used it to liven up what otherwise might have been dull guitars. Not wrong, but it leaves a bad taste in my mouth that Tak seem to have used it to plaster over a lot of functional cracks. Cedar has got what I see as good uses, as in classical guitars and some steel strings for fingerpickers, but it lacks headroom for heavy-handed playing. I have a cedar-topped Maton that I use for slide, a very good guitar in its own way, but not what I would see as a good flatpicker's guitar, and too open-sounding for my kind of fingerpicking.
#4
Thank you Tony for explaining it to me.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton