#1
I play classic rock and blues and I'm looking for a pedal that gives me more volume so I can cut through during the solos. Is there something that ONLY boosts volume, maintains the tone and NOT give distortion or other stuff? Budget is around $75. Thanks
#2
MXR Micro Amp. It's a clean boost pedal rather than a volume pedal. Note that if you're using a boost pedal or overdrive in front of a distorted amp, you're typically going to get more distortion rather than a volume boost. For a volume pedal I'd strongly recommend the Ernie Ball VPJr. Both can be used to great effect depending on your setup and all.

If you're amp doesn't have a way to get a solo boost (separate channel, switchable volume, or a solo boost function) you may have to roll your volume back on your guitar or with a volume pedal during your rhythm parts and turn it up for solos.
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#3
Any decent clean boost or EQ pedal can do it in the right situation. If your amp won't cooperate or doesn't have the right features, no boost pedal will be able to make it louder without changing the sound.

As noted above, oftentimes boosting the volume in front of an amp creates more distortion, even if the pedal itself makes none. It's just a consequence of adding more volume where the amp can't handle it without clipping.

Putting a clean boost in the effects loop usually works, if you have one. If the amp is run clean and has a decent amount of preamp headroom, you can put a boost right in front. You can also do things like use a volume pedal or EQ set to reduce the volume for normal playing and then turn the pedal off or set the volume back to full for solos. This works quite well if you have an amp without an effects loop that can't handle a boost in front.

What amp and guitar are you using, and how loud are you playing? Can you comfortably turn the amp's channel volume up without it distorting more?
#4
Quote by Roc8995
Any decent clean boost or EQ pedal can do it in the right situation. If your amp won't cooperate or doesn't have the right features, no boost pedal will be able to make it louder without changing the sound.

As noted above, oftentimes boosting the volume in front of an amp creates more distortion, even if the pedal itself makes none. It's just a consequence of adding more volume where the amp can't handle it without clipping.

Putting a clean boost in the effects loop usually works, if you have one. If the amp is run clean and has a decent amount of preamp headroom, you can put a boost right in front. You can also do things like use a volume pedal or EQ set to reduce the volume for normal playing and then turn the pedal off or set the volume back to full for solos. This works quite well if you have an amp without an effects loop that can't handle a boost in front.

What amp and guitar are you using, and how loud are you playing? Can you comfortably turn the amp's channel volume up without it distorting more?


I'm using american strat and a peavy classic 30. I like the idea of having a volume pedal to reduce my volume during rhythm section and turning off during the solos. I usually have a LOT of head room on my amp, as in my master volume on the amp is usually below 5. Also, I usually play on the clean channel and get my distortion from pedals. Do you know of a pedal that can reduce volume w/o interfering too much with the tone? Thanks
#6
Are you using distortion pedals when you're playing these solos? My first thought would be since it sounds like you've got a few distortion pedals, just designate one to be the "solo" pedal and bump the volume on it. It is unusual to add another pedal to not change the sound if you're already using a few specifically to add distortion. But it's still possible, and if that's what you need I think an EQ is a good solution. I'd put the EQ after all of your distortion pedals, right before the amp. You can probably boost or cut the volume at that spot and not change the sound too much, so experiment with the master volume and EQ settings to see what is the least intrusive.

A volume pedal is ok too but it doesn't give you the option of having two reliable "preset" volume levels. You have to adjust it each time it's not at maximum, which can be useful but doesn't sound like your goal in this case.