#1
Hej guys.

I'm mostly self-taught and been playing for approximately 6-8 months. Right now I'm learning with Youtube Guitar Lessons and able to play most Jimi Hendrix songs, so you know what my ''skill cap'' is. It made fun to learn songs that you wouldn't be able to play spontaneously, and I made big steps of progress, but now, I don't know what I should play to achieve progress.

Also, I'm not able to transcribe songs because I don't know how to start with ear training. That's a huge problem for me because till now, I was learning songs via youtube lessons, and it is a horrible feeling if you don't find the song you want to play!

So I would be glad if someone has advices on:
1. What other enjoyable songs there are,
2. How I start with ear training if I'm an absolute beginner in ear training.

Samy
Last edited by samy5301 at Feb 10, 2017,
#5
Try this...

Play along with a song in a special way that is all about teaching to hear harmony using the music as a question and your ear as the source of an answer, communicated through your fingers, and then evaluated by the judgement of the ear. Sounds complicated but it is easy.

During the first chord of the progression find any note on the guitar that sounds good. When the progression shifts to the next chord, decide if the note you have is going to sound OK or not by hearing it in your head. If so, stay; if not, decide if you need to move one or two frets up (or down) and hear if you were right. Keep going as the chords change.

You can start off going just up or just down on one string and picking just one new note for each chord change. You may be surprised how easy this is, even when hearing a new song for the first time. After you get good results going up and down on one string, one note of each chord change...

- go up or down for each chord change
- try making two new note changes per chord, later more
- include two adjacent strings, later more
- increase the fret span from 1 or 2 to 3 and then 4, maybe more
- include skipping over strings
- include hand position shifts
- etc...

As you get good at hearing faster and further, try to construct your lines with more deliberate variations in rhythm and melodic movement.
The method is just the ear being presented with a harmony, hearing possibilities, choosing one, hearing the result, and listening to verify what it heard corresponds to what it wanted to hear.

Hope this helps
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#6
When you say ear training i think you mean interval training if not just ignore. It will help with identifying the relationship between notes.
https://www.justinguitar.com/en/ET-002-SongIntervals.php

--
as for other songs, there are a many other songs out there. Jimi Hendrix isn't the only guitarist. And are you telling me that you know how to play Hendrix as well as Hendrix? or do you just know a couple of Hendrix riffs?
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#7
hecks Nah, i'm only playing for 8 months or so. More like a couple of Hendrix riffs. It just bothers me that I'm not able to figure them out by myself.
#10
Quote by samy5301
hecks Nah, i'm only playing for 8 months or so. More like a couple of Hendrix riffs. It just bothers me that I'm not able to figure them out by myself.
hey..your a newbee to guitar...Hendrix played for many years with some very talented artists and honed his skills..and he was a extremely talented musician and innovator..so if it takes you many months to learn some of his work don't feel bad..

suggestiions: if you are interested in learning MUSIC..study some theory (and harmony) it will accelerate your progress a lot..

songs: the Beatles wrote some fantastic songs with fairly simple chord progressions and fun melodies...get a song book and work through it..it will help your ear a lot..same with Paul Simon songs..simple chord progressions and cool melodies..

In doing the above you will begin to create your own work and start to "know" what chords to use with melodies..how to create simple but interesting progressions..and possible lyrics .. as the songs of the above artists were ingenious with the lyric construction..

hope this helps
play well

wolf
#11
 
Hi, everyone, new to here. Just thought I'll reply because I got the same struggles with ear training!

I love music and have been learning guitar as well, but even though I can hear the melody, I just can't really identify the intervals or chords! It's really frustrating when you can't just 'know' what you're actually hearing! I think that if I can really train my ears successfully, it would definitely help my guitar learning. 
Can anyone share their own experience on this as well, and if there are any tools/software you have used before that you would recommend (or not recommend)? I know it takes time and I've tried several apps but they don't really seem to help! Thank you, any comment will be appreciated  
p.s. I saw this online the other day and am actually quite looking forward to it http://www.vibes-science.com/ Maybe a wearable device will really help? Any thoughts on this?

Thanks again and have a good day!
#12
As a beginner myself, I find it very enjoyable to learn and play songs, but it really doesn't do anything for me as far as progressing into the next level, I just get better at whatever song it is. Once I started doing scales and chords and other routines, I found that when I came back to doing songs from tabs or whatever, everything seemed to come a little easier.
Flying in a blue dream
#13
It sounds odd to say you can play most Hendrix songs and you've been playing 8 months. I'd be curious to hear one or two. Do you have any audio clips?

If you like Hendrix maybe try some Van Halen. It's got that bluesy feel and some challenging riffs and solos.
#14
He said he just knows a few Hendrix riffs, no guitar player could play Hendrix well after 8 months - impossible.

Back to the topic, Hendrix is not ideal for learning by ear, there is too much going on. His rhythm work is hyper complicated and there tends to be a lot of overdubs and layers. Learning hendrix by ear is not a beginner's affair.

I would recommend songs that are very simple and have clear riffs - for example : Iron Man from Sabbath - that is a great beginner song for learning by ear - the notes are clear and the tempo is slow. Honestly, anything from that Paranoid album is perfect for ear learning. Another great album for learning by ear is Danzig 1 - it's straight blues rock but with very clear riffs . Punk , blues and rock are the best genre's to start on on for ear learning.

Anything primarily using power chords is good to start with because it's easier.
#15
The way to learn to grasp songs and play by ear is simple - learn the songs by ear, figure them out ears only, apply the time and effort it takes to do it without tabs, videos, tools, software, books, etc...

Listen to it
Play what you heard
Compare what you played to what you heard
Figure out how to get closer (ear not hearing it right or fingers not playing it right)
Repeat

It's called "by ear" to distinguish it from "by book, video, tab, software, or tool...". Attempts to jump start learning to play by ear don't work because all "helpers" miss the point - which is that you have to use the ears to develop the ears. Using materials comprised of words, named things, pictures, diagrams, etc. is using the wrong "channels". The ear's channel is the sound of music, not pictures or names. You cannot learn to hear music to play by ear through any graphics or verbiage.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
Last edited by PlusPaul at Mar 27, 2017,
#16
To echo some of the good advice above, the trick is to literally take it one note at a time . It's trial and error - listen to the first note of a riff, stop the music and try to find that note on guitar - then play the note with the recording to see if you got the right one - repeat this ad nauseum until the song has been deciphered. At first this process takes enormous amounts of time, but after a while you will be able to figure out entire songs very quickly.

The benefits of learning by ear make it time well spent.
#17
My advice would be to begin with an easy piece of music, not even necessarily a guitar piece.  I was always taught (and as a result I teach this to my pupils) that you need to approach any form of transcription using musical elements.  

1. Pulse - This is the heartbeat of the music that we listen to.  Establish your tempo and time signature before attempting anything else.
2. Rhythm - It's no use playing anything without the correct rhythm in place.  Look at how the piece you are transcribing is phrased and try to work out the rhythms that the composer is using.  Look and listen for rhythmic patterns in the music.
3. Pitch - Do you know any scales or anything about keys?  If not, then the aforementioned note by note approach may be the only option.  I would recommend learning some basic music scale theory to help you understand the relationship between all the notes you are attempting to transcribe.  Look at whether the notes move upwards or downwards in steps or leaps or stay at the same pitch.  
4. Harmony - See above.  If you know the notes and their function within the piece then you can analyse the harmony and relate all this to tone centres, key etc.
5. Dynamics - Try to work out how loud the music that you are transcribing is being played and notate that accordingly.
6. Articulation - Listen out for any slurred notes, vibrato, staccato etc.

When you view this, you will appreciate that the actual notes (pitches) are only a small aspect of any given piece of music and accurate transcription needs a holistic approach. 
#18
Quote by hecks
When you say ear training i think you mean interval training if not just ignore. It will help with identifying the relationship between notes.
https://www.justinguitar.com/en/ET-002-SongIntervals.php

--
as for other songs, there are a many other songs out there. Jimi Hendrix isn't the only guitarist. And are you telling me that you know how to play Hendrix as well as Hendrix? or do you just know a couple of Hendrix riffs?
hecks

I've been using the companion iPhone app the past week and it's VeRY good. It's a game of trying to identify intervals. I noticed huge improvements in just a few days and I'm going to stick with it. It's great to play around on the train while heading to work. Highly recommended.