#1
That wont break my pockets. I have a couple of guitars that I used regularly so I'd like something that isn't 30 dollars a set. I tend to leave me guitars on a 7 guitar rack and being a broke college student I generally just buy ernie ball slinkys 9 gauge. I put a set on my Gibson SG and after just a few days, maybe a week I notice some rust on them. I live in Cali so the weather here is usually pretty hot and tends to be a little more dry than humid.

On the other hand, I bought a used guitar which was freshly restrung a while back and I don't know what strings they used, but these didn't rust? Are slinkies just bad?

I'm considering elixir nanowebs but I'm not too sure. "strings that wont rust" may sound stupid but I am just looking for something that will last me at least a month for the guitars a keep at home. The slinkies sure didn't
#2
if you clean the strings after you play..they will last much longer..I use a micro-fiber cloth - a small dollop of rubbing alcohol on a corner of the cloth.. wrap the cloth around each string .then dry each one..it removes the sweat and oil from your fingers and built up dirt..which causes that rough pitted feel on the strings if you don't clean them..and rust becomes the end result of string decay...
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Feb 10, 2017,
#4
I use Elixers. Granted they cost a bit more than your run of the mill string sets, yet not anywhere near the 30 a set the OP was worried about, and seem to last MUCH longer before going dead.
New set of Elixers feel like butter on your fingers, and also will last quite a while. For the extra cost over a normal string set, IMO it's worth it to spend a bit more, and it evens out as they tend to last longer b4 going dead.
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#5
I've never had a set of EB Super Slinky's rust on me in over 20+ years. Always wash your hands before you play (very important) and wipe your strings down (all the way around) with a good clean, dry microfiber cloth. If that doesn't work on it's own then you need to look for a different brand or material of strings that work with your body chemistry. That can be different for everyone
#6
Quote by chris1mugen
That wont break my pockets. I have a couple of guitars that I used regularly so I'd like something that isn't 30 dollars a set. I tend to leave me guitars on a 7 guitar rack and being a broke college student I generally just buy ernie ball slinkys 9 gauge. I put a set on my Gibson SG and after just a few days, maybe a week I notice some rust on them. I live in Cali so the weather here is usually pretty hot and tends to be a little more dry than humid.


I'm in SoCal. On the guitars I use most, I buy the cheapest strings -- usually GHS Boomers (or rebranded GHS) in 9's and 10's -- and I change them frequently. Usually $2 - $3 per set. Guitars that don't get used get Elixir SomethingWebs. Two things that will rust your strings faster: leave your guitars on a rack and don't wipe them down. I use a *clean* microfiber cloth (don't use the same sweaty cloth over and over; you're simply redistributing corrosive sweat). And I keep a VCI (Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor) emitter (these are about $10 at theruststore.com) in the case and I keep the case closed. There's just so much crap in the air that you don't want to have a lot of extra air wafting by your guitars.

If your strings are rusting rapidly, it's likely that the rest of your hardware is corroding just as quickly -- the VCI and wipedowns help prevent that. When I leave guitars out, they seem to rust two or three times more quickly.
#7
Elixir nanowebs never rust for me - In my experience with them, they have been excellent - they outlast other strings by such a margin that the initial extra cost of them is moot because I still end up saving a huge amount of money in the long run, and I don't use anything else anymore for that simple reason. Your mileage may vary, of course, and some people just don't like the way they feel or sound. But definitely worth a try, imo.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#9
Repeating what's been said but clean after every use. Instead of a microfibre cloth there's plenty of string cleaners out there which have cloth pads which wrap around the string letting you clean all of them in a few swipes. I stick a bit of lemon oil on (since it helps clean the fretboard anyway) and swipe up and down a few times. If you use too much oil you end up with greasy strings, and too little oil does not much good, but just enough and it'll coat the strings keeping them fresh for months at a time. I do use EXP acoustic and NYXL electric strings which are coated anyway, but I'd imagine it goes a long way to helping uncoated strings too.
#10
You can either clean them a lot or change them a lot. I personally don't bother doing much cleaning, and change them out every 2-4 weeks, or more when I'm gigging. I don't think I ever leave them on long enough to actually rust, but Colorado is pretty dry.

Now it is pretty normal to see a little corrosion on the strings after a few days of regular playing, even if you do clean them every time. Unless they start sounding dead really quickly, I'd just give them a little cleaning once in a while and replace them when they start to sound dull or feel uncomfortable. No matter what, the strings will start to sound dull if you play a lot, no matter how clean you keep them.

I use D'addario 10s. They usually hold up well for a few weeks, but they're only like $5 a set, so changing them every few weeks isn't breaking the bank.
Last edited by cdgraves at Feb 11, 2017,
#13
Earnie ball slinkys rust pretty quickly. Those people's who dont probably take better care of them. They sound good though so its a tradeoff
#14
They all rust, some a take a little longer. I don't find the Elixir string a value at all, I buy 10 packs or D'Addario for about $30 and change strings every 2 months when doing rehearsals, bi-monthly when I start doing shows. I wipe and string condition (Fast Fret) before playing. Some people say Fast Fret brings in gunk, I usually clean that out with a Dunlop guitar maintenance kit every 3 or 4 times and I use guitar wipe rags or old 100% cotton t-shirt.
#15
Thank you everyone for the responses. I've neglected to wipe my strings before however I'll start. personally I do find nanowebs to work well for me, but I'll experiment with D'Addarios and GHS as well.