#1
I'm looking to increase my vocabulary into the realm of Jazz Blues with the chords and soloing.
Can anyone recommend artists? I'm kinda stumped... Robben Ford is a good one, I already know
#2
I'd search Miles Davis discography for any songs with "blues" in the name. But seriously, listening to non-guitar players gives you a different and more interesting vocabulary, especially when it comes to phrasing.

A song I've planned to learn for a long time is Goodbye Pork Pie Hat which I think could classify as a blues. Check out Jeff Becks version.
#3
copperwreckThat's actually a very good recommendation (Miles Davis). Also, Sonny Stitt, Stanley Turrentine, Charlie Parker. For less crazy, but still good, jazz blues sax ... David Sanborne. Guitar: Some Scott Hendersen, John Schofield, Wes Montgomery, Joe Diorio.

Health Warning: this stuff can get quite addictive as you get into it!
#4
FreakyRayman234

Probably best to start with the jazz chords first because they will suggest how to motivate your soloing:

- use 9th and 13th chords where you would find 7th chords
- use the 6/9 chord instead of maj7 for a darker major sound, since it has neither a third nor a seventh
- use different inversions (for example, 13th chords with the 7th on the bottom)
- use passing chords (diminished, augmented, 13thsus4, 6th, 7th #11sus2, 7thsus4b5, b13th...)
- convert slid chords (for example, in a Blues in G, instead of sliding C# 9th down to C9th, slide C# 9thb5 with the G on top down to C9th with the same G on top)
- explore the quartal chords (stacked fourths instead of stacked thirds)

Jazz chords are harder to figure out where to use just from the way they sound in isolation, and this is a big hurdle that keeps a lot of people from trying them... they often need a harmonic context for them to sound right; meaning that playing a lone #7b13b9add#9 chord may not inform you of how it could possibly be used until you find it in a song, then you hear how it works.

I won't say much about soloing except that conceptually you will be moving away from patterns and shapes, and more into the sound of the progression, chords, melody, and harmony. If you are used to swinging back and forth between major and minor pentatonic phrases in Blues as the progression chords change, it is kind of like that except there are many many more possibilities...

I second the listening suggestions; Sonny Rollins, Miles Davis, Wes Montgomery.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#5
Two names come to mind:

Kenny Burrell his work with Jimmy Smith and his album Midnight Blue

Larry Carlton album Sapphire Blue .. do a search on his work..

both have been playing many years and have worked with many the top names in jazz and have recorded many albums..

Burrell is Jazz/Blues
play well

wolf
#9
Also - John Scofield " A gogo " album is a goldmine of jazz funk solos - check out the tunes " Chank" and A Go Go. It's not blues per say, but applicable and he's a great study to break oit of basic blues soloing over dominant chords.
#10
Midnight Blue is excellent. KB's playing is kind of sneaky; a few nice phrases to reel you in thinking you get it, then he does something that leaves your heart pounding and feeling you MUST figure out what he played to do that. Nice bonus that his tone is up there with Wes.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#11
Quote by PlusPaul
FreakyRayman234[/

- use the 6/9 chord instead of maj7 for a darker major sound, since it has neither a third nor a seventh



Sorry to be a pedant but a 6/9 chord has a 3rd. Eg C6/9 would be made up of the notes C E G A D with the E being the 3rd. This could be voiced on the guitar thus:
X32233
#12
Opps, I play a lot of whatever you call the 2, 3, and 4 strings over the 6 string, and 1, 2, and 3 over the 5 string voicings... I was thinking 8X778X that omits the third (but has stacked fourths on top).
Happy to see someone who knows this chord.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.