#1
Hi,
I'm new to playing guitar but I'm getting the hang of it. I just have to share something I've done though, I changed the chords of my classic guitar and bought acoustic guitar chords (cause I thought it sounded way better, although I don't have an acoustic guitar) and changed it with them. Now I'm noticing that the last three chords are really tight and it's hard to make a good clean sound even when I use all the strength of my fingers, I followed every advice there is out there about finger position, hand position and how to get the best sound and noticed that I can do the G chord, em, C chord perfectly for example but when it comes to D chord there's nothing I can do. Does it have to do with what I done to my guitar? Because with the classic chords it didn't seem so tight. Any thoughts on this, because it really puts me down, I can't play much songs because I struggle so much with the tightness of the strings and it sucks!
#2
When you say you changed the "chords" on your guitar, I'm guessing you mean strings? You changed the nylon strings to steel strings right?

Get them off there asap. Classical guitars don't have a truss rod and can't take the strain that steel strings put on a guitar. Leaving them on there will break your guitar.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Feb 15, 2017,
#4
Quote by Tony Done
. . . , IIRC, 10-46 or less. . . .


Less. A set of 9 - 42 exerts a similar tension at standard tuning to a set of hard tension nylons.
#6
I still wouldn't risk it at all!
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#7
Yeah, there's absolutely no reason to risk it, at all. Get those strings off of there, never do that again, and pray that you haven't already done irreparable damage to your guitar (you probably have).
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#8
Quote by sarahinesb1994
Hi,
I'm new to playing guitar but I'm getting the hang of it. I just have to share something I've done though, I changed the chords of my classic guitar and bought acoustic guitar chords (cause I thought it sounded way better, although I don't have an acoustic guitar) and changed it with them. . .:


Hi Sarah (or Sara?)

If you want your classical guitar to sound more like a steel string guitar you could fit a set of Thomastik-Infeld "John Pearse" Folk strings. These are quite innovative:the bass strings (6th to 4th) are regular silver-plated copper wound on nylon multifilament but the trebles (3rd to 1st) are a flexible steel rope over wound with nylon tape. They exert the same tension as regular nylon strings so they will not damage your guitar. But they sound much more like steel strings than regular nylon strings. They are not cheap but they work. And the trebles last for ages - you can just fit new regular nylon basses when the John Pearse basses wear out.

More info here:

http://www.thomastik-infeld.com/family-detail/John%20Pearse%20folk

And here is a vid: