#1
Hi,

I've been eyeballing (ok drooling over) the Taylor 700 series. I found a used 2006 Taylor 710ce for a good price. But I've heard that the redesigned Taylor 700s in 2012 are amazing. Should I cough up the extra bread for a 2012 or later? Or would a pre-redesigned 2006 still be alright? Thanks!
#2
The 700 series Taylors have always been good guitars. Many people prefer the ones made before 2012. If it sounds good and hasn't been beat up then it is going to be a good guitar.
Not taking any online orders.
#3
I've been wondering about this, but I couldn't find out anything helpful. In your situation, I would be joining the Taylor forum and enquiring there. However, as Corduroy says, if it sounds good, it is good. I know from experience that other folks ideas of "amazing" are very often not the same as mine, but the Taylor group should be able to explain any differences in specs..
#4
CorduroyEW Thanks for your reply. Yeah, when it comes down to the Taylor 700 series. As long as the instrument is in good condition, then it kind of seems like a no-brainer.
#5
Tony Done Good idea about Taylor forums. Hadn't thought about that. Like you, I've found it remarkly challenging to get an answer. I think the bottom line is that the 700 series is awesome no matter the vintage - provided that the instrument is in good condition.
#6
Yeah, the 700 series has always been incredible guitars. The redesign is amazing, though. As are all the redesigns they've been doing since Andy Powers took over. The new 800s from a couple years back? Oh my damn...
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#8
the_bi99man Great. Now I want an 800 series. Ha! JK!!! I'm sure I'll be happy with the 700.


Thanks for your input.
Last edited by alli12 at Feb 21, 2017,
#11
Lutz is generally considered to be a better tonewood that sitka. It's got the stability of sitka with the warmth of engelmann. I don't think they switched due to lack of sitka. It is much more likely that they switched because that is what people wanted.
Not taking any online orders.
#12
Dunno, no-one talks about uniform 12-lpi sitka any more, which was the "gold standard" 30 years ago. Now it is all about torrefied (2nd growth) Adirondack. I'm a bit skeptical, things that are available and work, more or less, get talked up. - Necessity is the mother of invention and imaginative use of the truth.
Last edited by Tony Done at Feb 22, 2017,
#13
Quote by Tony Done
the_bi99man

Do you know what the redesign involved?


A lot of cosmetic upgrades, plus the different wood choices, as you guys were just mentioning, but the big thing has been the new bracing style. I don't really know enough about building acoustics to give a very detailed description of the changes or the benefits of said changes, but you can see clear as day that it looks different. The bracing inside the redesigns is a whole new pattern, with lines at various angles and X's and shit. And it varies in different body shapes. They say that it's supposed to help with the typical things that most folks look for in an acoustic. Brighter highs, fatter lows without getting muddy, and more balanced response across various playing styles. Along with the Grand Orchestra body shape, which replaced their traditional Jumbo, that new bracing has been the beginning of the new era for Taylor, since Andy Powers took over design direction and Bob Taylor moves toward retirement.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#15
Quote by Tony Done
Dunno, no-one talks about uniform 12-lpi sitka any more, which was the "gold standard" 30 years ago. Now it is all about torrefied (2nd growth) Adirondack. I'm a bit skeptical, things that are available and work, more or less, get talked up. - Necessity is the mother of invention and imaginative use of the truth.
It's not that it wasn't being used 30 years ago, it's just that it was usually being mislabeled as as sitka or engelmann based on it's colour. Back then guitar makers were much more ambiguous about what actually went into a guitar. Now cutting restrictions have forced makers and consumers to be more selective and accurate with their classifications.
Not taking any online orders.
#16
I read Taylor's blurb about Lutz and have concluded that their description is much less accurate than I expected. Lutz is a mix of several types of spruce including but not limited to Engelmann, sitka, white, red, black and even some European genetics made it into the mix. Adirondack spruce is red spruce grown in a certain location. Lutz shares a bit of red spruce genetics but when you remove red spruce from the microclimate of those eastern mountains you can't call it Adirondack anymore. Taylor has resulted to dropping buzzwords rather than giving an accurate description.
Not taking any online orders.