#1
I really want to get my pull-off technique right.

When pulling off on a string other than the high E, is it normal to touch the string below after you pull off? I've Watched lots of videos on YouTube to try and find this out but the videos either show you the pull off technique on the high E string or they don't mention anything about whether you should expect to touch the string below or not.

Can anyone clarify or point me in the right direction?

Thanks in advance.
#2
If by "string below" you mean the same string at a lower fret, yes; because you are pulling off from a higher fret to a lower fret that is being held by another finger "below"... for example pulling off with the fourth finger to the first finger, both fingers on the B string.

If by "string below" you mean pulling off on say the B string and wondering about touching the G string (or E string), maybe; some pull offs are just to get the upper and lower notes on the same string to play, one after the other, but often the pull off is just part of a phrase involving more notes so in the example above, one might use the fourth finger to pull off on the B string to the index finger below that on the B string, but then hammer on to the G string immediately after...

It may be confusing because when you pull off, your finger is not just lifting quickly, it is pulling off at an angle so that when the finger tip lets go it is kind of plucking the string to make it sound out. That side ways motion as part of the pull off may make it look like in a video that the finger is touching an adjacent string, but that is really just an artifact of the sideways pull off... the finger may actually touch another string but it is not doing so to make it sound out (unless one is actually going to another string to pick it or hammer on to it).
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#3
I've been touching the string below. I shouldn't, because it makes songs like Thunderstruck to be more hard to play with one hand only
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#4
Batman-Fan

I think I understand your question.

I've been working on my pull off as well and say when I pulled off from the 7th to the 5the fret on the g string my 1st finger was pressing down to flat so I was fretting the note on the b string as well.

So when pulled off you would hear the note I meant to play and when my finger brushed the b string you would hear the note I didn't want to play.

For me it was a combination of not pressing so hard with my first finger and curling it a bit so the fleshy pard of my finger touch the batting to deaden the note even if I did aspccidentslly hit it with my 3rd finger when I pulled off.

It's all about muting technique. Or so I am learning.
#5
When i say string below I mean for example if I'm pulling off on the D string is it normal to touch the G string as part of the pull off?

It seems unavoidable actually and I presume that you would just have to make sure the other string that you touch is muted. It seems this way in all of the videos I've seen although it I never mentioned.
#6
Batman-Fan
Quote by Batman-Fan
When i say string below I mean for example if I'm pulling off on the D string is it normal to touch the G string as part of the pull off?

It seems unavoidable actually and I presume that you would just have to make sure the other string that you touch is muted. It seems this way in all of the videos I've seen although it I never mentioned.


This is normal. The "problem" is dealt with my muting. Yoy may be holding your fretting finger on the D string too vertical to the neck. If so, when you pull off, the G string has nothing stopping it sounding as you catch it from the pull off.

So, flatten your finger out (imagine you laying your fingers flat across the strings, so everythinmg is deadened). Experiment with the angle, so it chokes the unwanted sound. Usually we back this up with muting from the picking-hand as well.

All good guitarists take a lot of care to cut out all unwanted string noise. Muting is an essential part of your guitar armoury!!

Even then, some folk will tie a rag around the neck, near the nut, (or use a hair band), if they are playing lots of legato (fast pull offs and hammer ons). Can even buy a gadget that does this. Cheating!!
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Feb 17, 2017,
#7
Don't forget compression, Jerry. You can use it to get rid of unwanted notes by setting the threshold for detection high enough to suppress extraneous noise.
#8
GoldJim This is true, but depending on the player, the signal level for the noise may be so high that either the real stuff gets missed, or the racket slips through. I don't think compression should be relied on for poor technique ... and certainly not when someone is learning. But I get your point. Now then, where did I put my compressor ... :-)
#9
jerrykramskoy, precisely. It's why I don't recommend compressors to beginners. It can lead to sloppy playing. Look all over YouTube and you'll find more over compressed, over distorted playing that if done clean would be reminiscent of those memes about singers using auto-tune. It's really just like when people play or sing along with an original track. Their mistakes are hidden in the weeds of the other player.
#10
jerrykramskoy

Quote by jerrykramskoy
Batman-Fan

This is normal. The "problem" is dealt with my muting. Yoy may be holding your fretting finger on the D string too vertical to the neck. If so, when you pull off, the G string has nothing stopping it sounding as you catch it from the pull off.

So, flatten your finger out (imagine you laying your fingers flat across the strings, so everythinmg is deadened). Experiment with the angle, so it chokes the unwanted sound. Usually we back this up with muting from the picking-hand as well.

All good guitarists take a lot of care to cut out all unwanted string noise. Muting is an essential part of your guitar armoury!!

Even then, some folk will tie a rag around the neck, near the nut, (or use a hair band), if they are playing lots of legato (fast pull offs and hammer ons). Can even buy a gadget that does this. Cheating!!


ty that helped a lot lol this has been a problem for me for a solid decade- i just never really got around to focusing in on the problem.
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#11
hecksWell mate, here's to a decade of cleaned up playing. Definitely worth working at ... you'll be amazed at how freely you can start to play once noise is no longer an issue. (Don't tense up doing the muting, or any form of playing. The mind can be the guitarist's worst enemy at times). Best of luck.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Feb 19, 2017,