#1
Looking for some resources on learning flamenco rhythms, Be it books or web series etc. Help me out if you can please!



Looking to learn how in the hell Gabriela does what she does
#2
Is there anything specifically you're after? If not, then honestly a lot of the percussive stuff isn't exclusive to just flamenco. For the percussive stuff I'd look at artists like Andy Mckee, Jon Gomm, John Butler etc. The percussive stuff can be found everywhere.
If you're after techniques associated with flamenco better start learning rasgueado if you haven't already. It's pretty much the technique that lays the foundation for the majority of flamenco strumming/rhythm. I wouldn't even begin to delve deeper in to the genre until you have learned the basics of rasgueado.
Last edited by vayne92 at Feb 18, 2017,
#3
This guy influenced a lot of my playing styles specifically rumba




He has a website with a lot of great free resources called http://nylonguitarist.com . He hasn't posted in a while, I hope he is okay haha but yeah Sal gave me a good starting point for flamenco and I hold him in very high regards
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
Last edited by hecks at Feb 18, 2017,
#4
Just a heads up - if you actually want to learn "proper" flamenco, keep in mind that it's a really difficult genre to play. Getting a gist of it through a web series is unlikely, and it requires tremendous technical skill. I have no reservations about saying that flamenco is the most difficult guitar oriented genre to play and learn. To be honest, Rodrigo y Gabriela aren't really a flamenco act, they play a fusion of different genres, and their style of percussive playing has very little to do with traditional flamenco techniques.

However, if you're just looking for some tips on getting a flamenco-y feel, and that kind of a percussive thing Gabriela does, just search "percussive acoustic guitar" on youtube and you'll find a ton of lessons since it's kind of a big thing now, and everyone wants to do it. Also check out the guitarists Vayne pointed out.
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Theory: Not rules, just tools.

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*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#5
Quote by Kevätuhri
Just a heads up - if you actually want to learn "proper" flamenco, keep in mind that it's a really difficult genre to play. Getting a gist of it through a web series is unlikely, and it requires tremendous technical skill. I have no reservations about saying that flamenco is the most difficult guitar oriented genre to play and learn.


I'd have to agree with this actually. I've played a fair bit of flamenco and to play it and play it well is HARD. You don't see very many people do flamenco justice. Even Paul Gilbert wrote a flamenco song and as far as Paul Gilbert is concerned it's very average. I don't quite know how to articulate what I believe are the struggles of playing flamenco, but if I were to try and explain I would say that no genre demands the "character" in your fingers that flamenco does. It's true that tone and sound in all forms of guitar playing comes from the fingers, but I feel it's exceptionally apparent in flamenco. Not to mention it's probably the only genre that's nearly exclusively played without a guitar pick, so it demands a sort of finesse in not one but two hands.

I guess that's the word one that actually perfectly describes flamenco - finesse. It requires some serious finesse.
Last edited by vayne92 at Feb 19, 2017,
#6
To add to this, most what is written above this post is correct. Sal's site has some interesting information, read all of it and try the material he provides. He's a decent, humble human being that's just sharing what he knows. And while it's just the tip of an iceberg, it's a good tip to start instead of just plunging into the deep waters that hold the rest.

If you're looking to play Rodrigo y Gabriela type of music, flamenco is possibly not for you. The both of them have on several occasions acknowledged that they do not play flamenco. Some vague techniques have been borrowed, but techniques are, contrary to popular belief, not what makes flamenco the style it is. It helps, of course. But the genre has always expanded beyond 'just singing' to 'singing and playing guitar', to the use of cajon, bass, flute, piano, and so on. This is possible, though some purists will deny it, because flamenco is not a 'technique'. It is a certain view on musical, cultural and historical traditions that are the foundation of flamenco. A rasgueado does not make something flamenco, nor does the combined use of an E and an F chord.

To put it in purely musical terms, Flamenco is music approached from a rhythmical point of view. These are specific rhythms, used to converse to others what we want the music to do. And these are applied to the sub-forms that flamenco has as a genre, which differ musically in terms of structure, time, speed, tonality and feel. If you want to really dive into it, let me know and I'll see what questions I can answer and how/where to help, but I reckon it's wise to decide whether you're actually looking into flamenco, or what is commonly and wrongly 'thought of' as flamenco.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
UG's Flamenco Club
Last edited by FretboardToAsh at Feb 22, 2017,