#1
I've been playing a lot more electric and lead guitar lately, and I find that the stuff I've been learning recently, when I don't want to plug in, is much easier on my wife's old acoustic guitar, which has .10 strings on it, than it is on mine. I've always used .12s on my acoustic. I'm thinking about making the switch to .10 strings for this reason, but I play a lot of drop D on the acoustic, and I'm worried that I might have to take the action way up to tune down without buzzing.

So, in short, does anyone have experience tuning down with light strings? Is it a problem?
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#3
Like Tony says, try it and see. I have 10s on one öf my guitars and drop D is fine. Perhaps try 11s too?
#5
I would definitely have problems if I strung up by Edwinson (25.375" scale) with 10s and dropped down to D.

Right now I've got light's on there (12s) tuned down to CGCFAE, and I think I'd have problems if I went any lower. I never do, but still

10s are way too light, I don't understand why you'd ever want to go that low
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#7
It'd just be some jangly nonsense that's easy to play but sounds weak and floppy

IMHO of course
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#8
Quote by Dreadnought
I would definitely have problems if I strung up by Edwinson (25.375" scale) with 10s and dropped down to D.

Right now I've got light's on there (12s) tuned down to CGCFAE, and I think I'd have problems if I went any lower. I never do, but still

10s are way too light, I don't understand why you'd ever want to go that low :o

This. I am honesty was thinking today I need to put thicker strings on my tele. Because they feel floppy to me due to playing acoustic most of the time.

In retrospect to the question, I don't think you have a problem going down to lower gauge with buzzing.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
Last edited by Blackwaterson89 at Feb 18, 2017,
#9
Quote by PatchworkMan
I've been playing a lot more electric and lead guitar lately, and I find that the stuff I've been learning recently, when I don't want to plug in, is much easier on my wife's old acoustic guitar, which has .10 strings on it, than it is on mine. I've always used .12s on my acoustic. I'm thinking about making the switch to .10 strings for this reason, but I play a lot of drop D on the acoustic, and I'm worried that I might have to take the action way up to tune down without buzzing.

So, in short, does anyone have experience tuning down with light strings? Is it a problem?
In all honesty, I'd leave the .053 or .054 E-6 on the guitar, and just go with the .10's on the top 5 strings. Plan "B", involves investigating "light top, heavy bottom" string sets which are available for acoustic guitars.

FWIW, the guitar will never actually play like your electric, since even an electric "regular" .010 set, has less tension than the bronze wound acoustic .010 set.

Many electric players have this philosophy that, "if the buzzing doesn't come through the amp, you're gold". That won't fly with acoustic.

Going from .012's to .010's, you lose about 30 lbs. of tension. Over a certain period, particularly if you're going into a drier season, you'll likely find you my even develop "positive relief" in the neck, where the 6th & 7th frets are actually higher than the rest. It's usually just a minor truss rod adjustment though, as long as the truss is in and working correctly..
#10
Speaking of light top/heavy bottom sets, I'm still on the lookout for heavy top/light bottom sets.

Am I the only player that thinks the bass strings on a set of lights are good enough, but the high strings are too weak??
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#11
Quote by Dreadnought
It'd just be some jangly nonsense that's easy to play but sounds weak and floppy

IMHO of course


I've never had them on my guitar, so I can't speak to the sound. I'm just toying with the idea because I've been working on stuff lately that works better on lighter strings. More bending, vibrato, etc.
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#12
Quote by Dreadnought
. . . 10s are way too light, I don't understand why you'd ever want to go that low . .

. . . . . It'd just be some jangly nonsense that's easy to play but sounds weak and floppy. . . .


Not so. There is very little difference in sound between 10s and 12s.
#13
Quote by Garthman
Not so. There is very little difference in sound between 10s and 12s.


Can't say I've ever had an experience where playing 10s on an acoustic was similar or only had "very little difference" to 12s
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#14
Quote by Dreadnought
Can't say I've ever had an experience where playing 10s on an acoustic was similar or only had "very little difference" to 12s


I posted this vid in a similar thread a few weeks ago. Have a listen.

#15
Yes, I have seen the video. Does nothing to change my experience, on my guitars and others, with acoustic strings that light compared with what I prefer.

You can continue this pedantry, or you can acknowledge that we have different preferences and opinions on this.
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#16
Quote by Garthman
I posted this vid in a similar thread a few weeks ago. Have a listen.


Actually there is clearly difference in sound. The tone of lights sound fuller then the extra light.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
Last edited by Blackwaterson89 at Feb 20, 2017,
#17
Quote by Blackwaterson89
Actually there is clearly difference in sound. The tone of lights sound fuller then the extra light.


Nah. Macho kidstuff nitpicking.
#19
Quote by Garthman
Nah. Macho kidstuff nitpicking.

Not really man. I use to think the same when I was in high school almost 10 years ago. The more as I get older the more my ears gets better at picking up tonal things. I can tell the difference between picks now days. Some days I prefer a delrin pick, other days I prefer celluloid pick depend on what I am playing. I prefer the tone of Celluloid pick but I end up using delrin picks cause my hands get sweaty and that celluloid pick slides around. I use a delrin pick for flatpicking stuff. I prefer lights strings to medium because they don't sound as dark as mediums and easier on my ring/pinky fingers.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#20
Quote by Garthman
Nah. Macho kidstuff nitpicking.


Beg your pardon?
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#21
I can definitely hear the difference in tone, even in the video through shitty laptop speakers. But I'd be willing to see if the difference in playability is worth the trade-off--especially since I almost never perform without amplification (and therefore EQ).
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#22
There's always elevated E, same as drop D. Capo on 2nd fret covering the top 5 strings leaving the bottom E open. You don't have to retune and there's less need to mute the open bottom.
#23
Quote by skido13
There's always elevated E, same as drop D. Capo on 2nd fret covering the top 5 strings leaving the bottom E open. You don't have to retune and there's less need to mute the open bottom.
I do that, too, but it's not the same thing. The low string is fingered differently (and, obviously, they're a whole step apart).
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#25
Quote by Tony Done
I've also used a "dropped D" capo. I prefer it to drop D tuning, as it allows easier use of the open G chord, but I don't use that tuning a lot, so I haven't got any strong opinions either way.

I think they're good for slightly different things. The partial capo is better for situations where you're going to be fingering that low string a lot, especially in a major key. Drop D gives you a lower bottom note, good for droning pedal tones, and easy use of the minor third for bluesy stuff.
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#26
Patch try those Erine ball rock n blues acoustic strings, it may be an answer for you.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#27
Quote by PatchworkMan
I think they're good for slightly different things. The partial capo is better for situations where you're going to be fingering that low string a lot, especially in a major key. Drop D gives you a lower bottom note, good for droning pedal tones, and easy use of the minor third for bluesy stuff.


A better explanation might be that "elevated E", as we're calling it, doesn't require changes in chord fingering, even for the open E minor, (or E) open shape, as you can put the barre, behind the capo/

Still "drop D", isn't "elevated E", because they're 2 different keys. That may not matter to a guitar player, but could matter a great deal to a singer.

So, if you want "drop D" with a 5 string capo, you have to tune the whole guitar down to D-d first, then apply the capo. That does negate the advantage of simply slapping a capo on the 2nd fret.

FWIW, I've been using a 5 string capo for years on Badfinger's "Baby Blue". Couple of caveats though. I "hear" the lead guitar hook as a bass line, and play it "upside down" on a 12 string. (With a twelve you get the hook on the octave strings, doubled by the bass on the prime strings).
#28
Yeah, that's what I was saying in the post before the one you're quoting. They're two different things, with different fingerings and in a different key.
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