#1
Hey folks

A friend and I are planning on jamming together and maybe playing some bar gigs in the near future. I'll be doing electric and classical guitar with vocals, so I need a few pointers on what an ideal rig would look like (keeping within budget of course).

If I'm going to be purchasing a powered speaker, mixer and microphone, can I just throw in an amp modeler (and a piezo transducer) and call it a day? Doing so would save me a lot of money. I attached a diagram of what I have in mind.

I do realize a cheap tube modeler will never sound as good as a real tube amp, but I can always upgrade it in the future (or just get an amp when I have more money).

Another concern is that the mixer I want only has EQ options for one channel (which would be vocals). That means I'll only have the option of controlling the volume of my classical guitar.

My last question is whether the powered speaker could handle screaming/growling vocals over a metal band.

EQUIPMENT LIST AND PRICES (In Canadian dollars)
Alto Tx15: $280
Mackie Mix Series 5 Channel: $65
Shure SM58: $120
Behringer TM300 Tube Amp Modeler: $40
AXL PG-800 Piezo Transducer: $30

Last edited by Grlzzly at Feb 19, 2017,
#2
So what is your friend playing?

This is an odd arrangement. Don't forget you need a mic stand and a speaker stand too, and something in the venue to put the mixer on.

I can answer your last question though. Yes, provided the metal band are not using mic'd up drums, a big backline and a credible PA (like most metal bands do actually).
Last edited by PSimonR at Feb 19, 2017,
#3
Not sure I follow you, You trying to say you and your pal don't already have amps and are planning to do some gigs with some cobbled together entry level gear? Yea that should be interesting, But hey we all start somewhere and Live and learn is my moto, My advice? Have fun and screw what anyone thinks.
#4
Quote by PSimonR
So what is your friend playing?

This is an odd arrangement. Don't forget you need a mic stand and a speaker stand too, and something in the venue to put the mixer on.

I can answer your last question though. Yes, provided the metal band are not using mic'd up drums, a big backline and a credible PA (like most metal bands do actually).


My friend will be playing drums. We're also looking for a bassist.

Quote by nastytroll
Not sure I follow you, You trying to say you and your pal don't already have amps and are planning to do some gigs with some cobbled together entry level gear? Yea that should be interesting, But hey we all start somewhere and Live and learn is my moto, My advice? Have fun and screw what anyone thinks.


My friend plays drums. We're going to have to find a bassist as well. And no, I don't have an amp (I fried my Vox VT50 a long time ago and have been playing acoustic ever since).
#6
If I were in your position, and had your budget, I would be looking to buy a small second hand PA system with at least four channels with tone controls. SM58 is a real pro mic but AKG D5 is nearly as good for considerably less. But the biggest problem with this approach - i.e. without an separate amp for the guitars is feedback. Where do you put the speakers so you can hear them and they are also pointing at the audience with out then pointing straight down the mic? (will also feedback the acoustic at any volume). Even a small cheap guitar amp is better than none at all unless you have a monitor and separate monitor mixing.

(although you could also consider a small PA with feedback prevention - but this would be no use for the metal vocals)

See next thought....
Last edited by PSimonR at Feb 19, 2017,
#7
Grlzzly

Thinking about this a bit more and looking in the future of where you might be heading, get what you had thought to get, but with better mixer. At least 4 decent channels (mic channels) with full tone control and a monitor mix output. You can then add another tx15 when you can afford to and then a small powered monitor.
#8
Quote by PSimonR
If I were in your position, and had your budget, I would be looking to buy a small second hand PA system with at least four channels with tone controls. SM58 is a real pro mic but AKG D5 is nearly as good for considerably less. But the biggest problem with this approach - i.e. without an separate amp for the guitars is feedback. Where do you put the speakers so you can hear them and they are also pointing at the audience with out then pointing straight down the mic? (will also feedback the acoustic at any volume). Even a small cheap guitar amp is better than none at all unless you have a monitor and separate monitor mixing.

(although you could also consider a small PA with feedback prevention - but this would be no use for the metal vocals)

See next thought....
Quote by PSimonR
Grlzzly

Thinking about this a bit more and looking in the future of where you might be heading, get what you had thought to get, but with better mixer. At least 4 decent channels (mic channels) with full tone control and a monitor mix output. You can then add another tx15 when you can afford to and then a small powered monitor.


For the feedback problem I think the only solution would be to have two tx15s (at least for live shows)... I'd have one behind me (for my bandmates) and another in front of me pointed at the audience. And I would monitor using the mixer's headphone jack.. So using a single Tx15 would at least get me by for rehearsals.

As for the mixer, what if I went with the Mackie 402-VLZ4? It only has two mic channels, but isn't that all I need (for the mic and guitars?).
Last edited by Grlzzly at Feb 19, 2017,
#9
It might work OK initially but its a really sh*t mixer. You will be puting it in the bin within a few weeks.

Yes 2 tx15s would be good, but eventually 3 would be better. Left / right and monitor. Actuallt the TX 12 would be good enough to start and 2 x tx12 + subs + 2 x tx10 for monitor would be a good objective.

http://www.soundcraft.com/en/products/epm6
would be so much better and last much longer. Even when you get some subs to go with the tx15s you can mic up the snare and kick drum and you get REAL tone control too - not just bass and treble.
#10
I'd say find a mixer with effects, at least something that can handle some reverb as you'll need that for vocals and acoustic guitar.

You can also get something like a used guitar processor and create el. guitar and clean guitar patches and use that for guitar sounds.
Boss GT-8, GT-10 might do ok for that kind of setup. Definite no on that Behringer box. If you want something like that - look at Sansamp, TRI-AC is great for direct out and can save 3 sounds at your feet.