#1
I got a nice MIM strat recently and have noticed that the neck is somewhat susceptible to temperature. Being that I got it for fast paced wedding gigs, it'd be nice if it stayed in tune a little better after the neck warms up. At some point I'd like to swap it out with one that isn't so sensitive. I have a Yamaha with a birdseye neck that's just invincible and holds tune remarkably, as well as another Fender that is really stable.

So what materials and finishes are best for stability? Any specific brands?
#3
As you noticed, two Fenders have different levels of stability. So it's hard to say all the time what will be more stable. A lot of the time it's just luck.

Warmoth has some options with baked/roasted maple and double action truss rods, etc. which might be a bit more sturdy. Otherwise a few companies make necks with carbon fiber reinforcements, or places like Moses make the entire thing out of carbon fiber. That's pretty extreme but it's about as sturdy as it gets if you really want that.
#4
No guarantees with wood, sorry.
Multi-piece necks are generally far less susceptible to temperature and humidity changes, which is part of the reason that Gibson has traditionally put multi-piece maple necks on its top of the line guitars.
Necks made out of non-wood materials (aluminum, as in the Travis Beans, Carbon as in some Parkers) are generally temperature-indifferent.
The baked/roasted maple necks are supposed to be more stable at the expense of being more brittle.
#5
Does being one piece vs two piece make a difference? My more stable guitars are maple/rosweood, but the new strat is one piece maple. It's also not the highest quality of maple, but having a nice birdseye neck has spoiled me a little bit.

I guess even if the stability thing can't be solved with certainty, it'd still be nice to have a neck on there that feels and looks better.
#6
Quote by cdgraves
Does being one piece vs two piece make a difference? My more stable guitars are maple/rosweood, but the new strat is one piece maple. It's also not the highest quality of maple, but having a nice birdseye neck has spoiled me a little bit.


If "two piece" means neck of maple and fretboard of rosewood, then no, there's not a significant difference (some maple neck guitars actually have a second piece of maple as the fretboard as well). This is a Gibson L5-S neck:



And this is the basic construction method:



The combination of pieces resists twisting and bowing far better than a single-piece neck, and has traditionally been used on the highest-end instruments (it's more expensive to make), where single-piece necks are usually the norm for lower-end guitars.