#1
Hi there,
im an amateur musician who try to create music at his home-studio. Im 24 years old though and still dont know that much about it(composing). i can play ok, pop songs and solos are easy, but not shred the guitar like steve vai or some metalhead. Dont know much more than the pentatonics with blue note, but ill keep studying and training.
i think im too old to learn this stuff though
wonder if im ever gonna be a pro. knowing much more about music and shredding the guitar, or this it, im at my best right now.
ps: im good in math
should dedicate myself to math and forget music??
will i ever get much better than this??
any opinions??
#2
If you played a sport that you loved, you'd get out and play with other players. Whether it is baseball, football, basketball, you know where I'm going. That's the only way you know if your skill and talent is good enough to keep going or just resign yourself to the occasional backyard game with some friends. I think the same is true with being a musician. You have to play with others to find out what you need to move on and get better. Get out and play with other musicians to test your skills, get inspired and and learn to interact with others players and singers. You'll find new influences playing things you didn't pick for yourself and learn so much more. Just my two cents worth of opinion. As Joe Walsh said the goal is not to become a legend in your own garage or bedroom.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Feb 20, 2017,
#4
This is a great site to help with songwriting http://www.secretsofsongwriting.com

Don't worry about shredding. You'd probably never use it in real life and other than guitar players no one likes it. Wonder what the drummer and bassist is thinking when your playing your 10 minute solo? I call it Guitarst music. It's a phase a lot of players go thought when they are young but normally grow out of it.
(Adding a bit here and there can be great thought)


99% of rock/pop bands would rather have a guitarist that can keep rhythm than a dude who can shred with no rhythm.

Also you definitely need to learn the major scale, it's just adding 2 more notes to the pentatonic.
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
Last edited by Guitar137335 at Feb 20, 2017,
#5
Do you want to be a professional? Being a pro musician takes a lot of fucking work, but if you love music enough to put in hours every day, it's extremely gratifying. You have to set goals, organize your time, do stuff that's not always fun, and work well with other musicians. It's a job like any other, except it's a whole lot more fun than other things that require the same amount of effort. It's ultimately a question of how much you're willing to rely solely on yourself for your livelihood.

And attitude matters as much as ability. You won't get paid to shred until you're good at shredding, but you can go out this weekend and get paid to play C F G all night. On any given day, your abilities are what they are, no more and no less, and it's up to you to make the most of them. A lot of people who make money are really basic players, but they have a great attitude towards their craft and play the best damn 3 chord rock they can. Your attitude towards other people is also extremely important - you have to have a consistently positive attitude. Successful musicians who treat others poorly and mope and whine are usually only successful because someone else has a good enough attitude to make up for it. Don't be that guy. Be the guy who makes the best of every situation and treats every person as if they have something offer, because they do.

I work with some musicians who are relentlessly positive, even sometimes to the point of being incorrect and inconveniencing other people, but they also NEVER miss an opportunity to make the band more successful and give our audiences an better show. And they aren't people with ridiculous chops who can go play sessions in LA or tour the world with a famous band. They're just regular people determined to make the best of what they have. I would so much rather work with people who are unjustifiably positive than unjustifiably negative. No question.

Don't worry about your age. The value in chasing your dreams is what you learn and how you grow along the way, not whether you ever actually achieve it. It's not as if there's a cutoff age at which you are no longer allowed to be a professional musician. If you're a pro, you're a pro, and all that matters is how you sound and how you treat other people.
Last edited by cdgraves at Feb 20, 2017,
#6
24 and you're wondering if you're too old? Come on man...

First of all, I've seen people over 60 that learn guitar and music theory for the first time and within a couple years they're better at it than I am after 27 years.

Second, I suggest you drive that kind of attitude right out of your head before it ruins your life. "You can't teach an old dog new tricks" is a complete and utter crock of poo poo. It's that kind of thinking that kills people only a few years, or even months, after they retire.

Your soul has no age, and that's where music, and all other intentions, comes from. Short of becoming physically unable to play, it's never too late. I mean, there aren't going to be many who join a band at 60 and run off touring the world, but that's not the only definition of a "professional" musician.

Now go learn a new scale and practice it for 8 hours a day and report back in a week. lol

P.S. By the way, I'm 43-years-old and over the last two years or so I have about tripled my guitar playing ability (how to measure that I don't know, but it feels like about tripled). All it took was the right attitude and the effort.
"Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." -some dude
Last edited by Prime2515102 at Mar 16, 2017,
#7
Although I have been playing guitar and doing regular gigs for 40 years (and to a lesser extent piano and keys) I have never honestly invested the real intense time and practice it takes to be at the level I should and want to be at. I could (and probably will) retire from my job in another year. I plan on going back and starting from scratch on the guitar. I realize that breaking all my self taught habits won't be easy but I look forward to it. I have already picked my teacher for guitar and I am planning to take formal piano lessons.

The point is you are never too old to learn something new or improve on something old. At 24 you have your whole life ahead of you just keep playing and remember people won't be knocking down your door to find you. You have to get out and search hard for opportunities and make your presence and abilities known to players in your area. Play anything, anytime, anywhere. That's what a professional musician does. It's all about learning and experience.

“Success occurs when opportunity meets preparation” - Jimmy Johnson
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Feb 22, 2017,
#8
Quote by Rickholly74
Although I have been playing guitar and doing regular gigs for 40 years (and to a lesser extent piano and keys) I have never honestly invested the real intense time and practice it takes to be at the level I should and want to be at. I could (and probably will) retire from my job in another year. I plan on going back and starting from scratch on the guitar. I realize that breaking all my self taught habits won't be easy but I look forward to it.


I'm in the same boat. I just recently starting "re-structuring", if you will, my entire technique. You're right, it's not easy! lol But making progress in that area feels pretty exciting, like when I first started playing. I find myself thinking, 'wow! did I actually just play that?' more and more often.

I actually thought my guitar suddenly started sounding way better; that maybe it just finally broke-in after four years. Somebody pointed out to me that I was getting a lot better though so maybe that's all it is. I have been playing like 10 times more in the last few months though, and playing them is what gets them to sound better, so maybe it's a little of both, I dunno.

Fun times...