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#1
Learning a specific song?

Trying a new style?

Playing them scales till your fingers bleed?

Getting used to a new instrument?

What do you currently have going on right now in your world of acoustic guitar? Most of us are always trying to get better, or get back to where we were, or maybe just doing some maintenance playing. The world of acoustic guitar is so much larger than campfire strumming, maybe the ideas of what someone else is doing will encourage another of us.

Currently, I'm trying to transcribe a fingerstyle piece I wrote in high school (and one of my better pieces, to be honest, from a melody and soundscape perspective) but have since forgotten and never tabbed out. I have four of my own pieces tabbed out with proper sheet music as well at this point, and this one was written for m wife (then girlfriend) and I'd love to relearn it.

A goal of mine is to have a small, well-recorded EP of 5-7 songs, with accompanying sheet music/tablature for all songs.

HOW BOUT YOU?
My God, it's full of stars!
#2
I have been working on bluegrass stuff for awhile trying get that style down. However I always end up back messing around with some folk stuff. I been working on some The Band songs this weekend and got a guitar tab book of their stuff in the mail. I learned Long Black Veil (Gregg Allman's Version), Guys like me (Eric Church), and been jamming on the weight all weekend. I been messing around in open C on one of my guitars and Open G on another. I have my Jasmine turn to Open G, my Oscar to Open c, Squier to open E, and my main Dread tuned to standard. I am about sit down and learn Sugar Mountain by Neil young. Sundown by Gordan Lightfoot is on my list this week too. I am waiting on my new issue Acoustic Guitar, it is an all bluegrass issue it looks like this month coming up. I would like try get Epiphone AJ220 or Hummingbird by the end of the year.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#3
I've been stuck n a rut for well over a year now. I play the same crap, out of force of habit, way too much. I'm halfheartedly trying to learn a couple fairly simple songs: "King of the Road" and "I Am Weary (let me rest)". I'm trying to incorporate more partial strums into my fingerpicking as well. I should be playing on my CF dread, but I can't pull myself off my Cargo.

I'll probably relearn "Wish You Were Here" as well. Some family members asked me to play it the last time I went home to visit. I used to play it when I first learned to play 30 years ago, but kinda forgot it. I remember it was pretty easy, shouldn't take more than a few minutes.
#4
Learning a new styles and techniques on old songs. Yesterday it was "Sweet Home Alabama" on lap steel steel, trying to keep more or less in the spirit of the original. I'm also trying to emulate bluegrass style flatpicking as a fingerpicking technique, for example, Tony Rice's "Last thing on my mind". I've been playing that song fr about 50 years, and I get a lot of pleasure out of trying to play it in different ways. I think that might be a bit eccentric.
#5
Quote by Tony Done
Learning a new styles and techniques on old songs. Yesterday it was "Sweet Home Alabama" on lap steel steel, trying to keep more or less in the spirit of the original. I'm also trying to emulate bluegrass style flatpicking as a fingerpicking technique, for example, Tony Rice's "Last thing on my mind". I've been playing that song fr about 50 years, and I get a lot of pleasure out of trying to play it in different ways. I think that might be a bit eccentric.
I actually being trying do the same but in reverse. I been messing around flatpicking blues that normally is finger picking. I failed
Tony let me know how it turns out cause I would love see how it turn out, you know how big fan of Tony Rice I am.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
Last edited by Blackwaterson89 at Feb 20, 2017,
#6
Quote by TobusRex

I'll probably relearn "Wish You Were Here" as well. Some family members asked me to play it the last time I went home to visit. I used to play it when I first learned to play 30 years ago, but kinda forgot it. I remember it was pretty easy, shouldn't take more than a few minutes.


Psst......
#8
Laying down acoustic tracks for my album all the time. But in terms of actually learning something, I am working on a few songs from BH acoustic shards and colma.
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^ I've just realised if you say Simple Plan's 2011 effort "Get Your Heart On!" really fast in a Southern American accent, it sounds gross. . .like sexual gross!

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Hello.
I'm looking for professional bongo-ists and triangle-ists to make a Progressive Technical Brutal Death Metal band
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#9
Quote by TobusRex
Har de har har....

Check this out, Cranky. What do you think? Looks like a couple bridge pins are missing, the top is cracked, and God knows whatever else is wrong with it.

I think it would have sounded glorious in its day. The trouble is, it's most likely got a neck profile like the bat end of a 40 oz Louisville slugger. As I've always said, my maple body Guild jumbo 12 string, was the most beautiful sounding unplayable guitar I've ever owned. All I can say about that is, John Denver must have been a lot stronger than he looked..

Besides, that junk is likely falling apart, as he's only got 6 strings on it, I'm trying to imagine that fat neck as a 6 string, and I can't even picture a reason for picking the damned thing up, let alone trying to play it. This is a different era, and I have my EJ-200's for that.

Now the Taylor 150e OTOH, is a dread, but a thin bodied example and has a reasonably slim profile neck. It would however, most likely be a shock to your system after messing around with your cargo all the time.

I most often play my Crafter SA-12 string, which is a semi acoustic Taylor T-5 knockoff, which has the nicest neck I've ever encountered on a twelve. The trouble there is, it sounds like shit on my Peavey eCoustic 208, so I had to find an amp with a 12" speaker.. (really long story).

Since I'm sure you don't want to drag a 30 lb or so amp around to your relatives to play one acoustic song, we've come full circle back to the Taylor, and before I forget, a strobe tuner with a good screw tension capo like the Planets Waves NS.
#12
Quote by Blackwaterson89
I have been working on bluegrass stuff for awhile trying get that style down. However I always end up back messing around with some folk stuff. I been working on some The Band songs this weekend and got a guitar tab book of their stuff in the mail. I learned Long Black Veil (Gregg Allman's Version), Guys like me (Eric Church), and been jamming on the weight all weekend. I been messing around in open C on one of my guitars and Open G on another. I have my Jasmine turn to Open G, my Oscar to Open c, Squier to open E, and my main Dread tuned to standard.  I am about sit down and learn Sugar Mountain by Neil young. Sundown by Gordan Lightfoot is on my list this week too. I am waiting on my new issue Acoustic Guitar, it is an all bluegrass issue  it looks like this month coming up.  I would like try get Epiphone AJ220 or Hummingbird by the end of the year.

Love me some alternate tunings. For better or for worse though, I only have two acoustics (and one classical), so sometimes I'm changing between 4-5 tunings in a single playing session.
My God, it's full of stars!
#13
Quote by Tony Done
Captaincranky
Interesting, but I don't hear the jangle in the low notes, it would be a bit lower down the alphabet the "B" for me.
For you possibly. But for Tobus, it would be interesting to jack his cargo into it.

Besides,I'm not exactly what you'd call an acoustic purist. Nor am I someone who enjoys the "jangle", from strings being out of tune

Then too, 12 strings can be tiring to listen to at length. With a synth, you just step on the pedal and you're back to a sixer.
#15
I'm adding some of my old stuff to an elevated E song set. This would be similar to a drop D style but with the capo on the top 5 at the second fret leaving the bottom E open. You have to mute the bottom a lot in drop D but much less in elevated E. And you don't have to change tuning.
So far I have "Can't Find My Way Home", "Four And Twenty", "Flowers Never Bend With The Rainfall", Mark Collie's "In Time" from the movie The Punisher, "Whiter Shade Of Pale " with harmonica, "Patterns" (S&G) only done in drop D style. I'm doing these on the '73 Yamaha FG200. Never owned a top of the line guitar but this Yamaha beats out everything I've compared it to.
I got a split top on a Walton I gotta fix.
Finishing up the brass bridge with adjustable saddles on the '67 Silvertone archtop (weather dependant, the shop's not heated).
#16
Quote by Dreadnought
Love me some alternate tunings. For better or for worse though, I only have two acoustics (and one classical), so sometimes I'm changing between 4-5 tunings in a single playing session.

I feel your pain. I have 4 acoustics and one Electric. I play the one my grandfather made the most. Back when I only have 2 guitars I did the same thing. One Standard and one Eb standard. I usually buy a guitar a year, a cheap one anyways.
"Music became a healer for me. And I learned to listen with all my being. I found that it could wipe away all the emotions of fear and confusion relating to my family." Eric Clapton
#17
hello
pour ma part , c est voodoo child de JMX ! dur dur !!!!!
jouer , jouer mais jouer de la gratte ! putain!!!!
#18
Mostly working on playing my jam session tunes, and continuing to pick up new stuff (started on Cracker's Teen Angst a few weeks back, and on the traditional Seven Drunken Nights in preparation for St. Paddy's as it's been a while since I learned an Irish tune)
#21
Tony Done I've gotten used to listening to steel string celtic music thanks to Pierre Bensusan, and for me, the sustain of a steel string perfectly captures the clarity of the high strings and "let ring"-ingness of the music.

It's an old recording, and David Russell is of course David Russell, so his variation (which is the authoritative arrangement) is impeccable. I just prefer the type of music on a steel string.

It his, however, eminently less tiring on the fretting hand to play this on a classical. Not to mention, the spaces between the hands are more forgiving than on a steel string, especially when forging ahead with this piece at the speed that he does

Also, this piece is now my "NOW WORKING ON" piece
My God, it's full of stars!
#22
A civilization in Age of Empires II. I'm terrible at it and need practice.
Yeah, uh-huh...that's what they all say.
#24
I'am..currently working on chord progressions.  It's tough but we all gotta start somewhere? Right?
#25
Quote by BassFishin
A civilization in Age of Empires II.  I'm terrible at it and need practice.


I hear ya. I either get rushed, or go to castle too late (on account of making a feudal army)
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I cant be naked. I have a huge fear of leaving a stain wherever i sit. Especially if its really warm
#28
benhauger Why do I feel like you're taking the piss

I just started on an easy DADGAD piece, 'le voyage pour l'irlande' arranged by Pierre Bensusan. For a native Frenchman, his celtic playing and arrangements are remarkable.

He's also my single favorite acoustic player. His Guitar Book is my favorite guitar book (lol) that I own.

His extended versions are amazing. What a master

My God, it's full of stars!
#29
voodoo chil d 
jouer , jouer mais jouer de la gratte ! putain!!!!
#31
funk and r&b mainly. 
also ear training, just listing to a song and trying to figure it out.
i hadn't been playing a lot the last few years, so i bought a new amp and guitar then got back into it.
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Taylor GA 214E
Last edited by the_white_bunny at Mar 17, 2017,
#32
I've been working on some Dream Pop/Shoegaze/Post-rock/Post-punk project in the last month. 3 songs ready. gonna create at least 4 more and let's see how things turn out.

I'm thinking if I should sing it in english or portugese since I'm from Brazil. Not many bands in these styles here so this could be something to diferentiate from the bunch. however, i worry about alienating people worldwide, since this is a style more apreciated abroad. even tough, in this genre, the voice is just like another instrument, buried within the mix.

of course none of this matters in real life. this style is underground as it gets. but it's funny to think about these topics.
#33
Yeah I wouldn't worry about alienating your global audience before you have a local one

Dream pop is gaining some popularity, I'd say though.
My God, it's full of stars!
#34
Dreadnought I know, right? hahah

but well, i think its not much of a deal. Alcest popularized the genre again, and they sing in french. there is something in this style that much like black metal, goes well in pretty much every language. let's see how it turns out.

I have other projects as well but this one is the most relevant since i'm the one doing everything.
#35
Dreadnought oh yes, and, in fact, its really popular. but not exactaly mainstream. i think that, in the music scene of today, these terms no longer apply to the same meaning. but that is a topic for another thread. haha
#36
im working on selling my acoustic because I don't have a single song I want to learn. Music brings me no joy anymore.
#37
Quote by voxman22
im working on selling my acoustic because I don't have a single song I want to learn. Music brings me no joy anymore.

 Like I always say, "life sucks and then you take up listening to sports talk radio"....
#38
John Petrucci Rock Discipline. "What you give" by Tesla on acoustic. Getting used to a new guitar and amp, and experimenting with different sounds and tone. Ear training. Playing fast with a metronome, playing off beat with a metronome, playing slow with a met. "Hotel California". Changing chords smoothly. Scales. Patience. Discipline, and so on...
Flying in a blue dream
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