#1
Hey guys,I finally made an account on here so I can ask this question.Im trying to learn this song Puddle by chon and this one is a tough one.Ive been playing for five years now and I've never really attempted to learn anything that requires me to play this fast.Ive been practicing the first sweep on the song for three weeks now at an agonizingly slow tempo and while I've gotten a little faster I still can't play it up to speed.How am I going to learn the rest of the song if I can't even play that?

Here's the song
Last edited by tborden001 at Feb 20, 2017,
#2
Your fingers are always dependent on your ears to direct them what to do...

Speed of playing comes from time on the instrument, no so much by trying to play faster... it comes naturally as you learn to hear faster and more complex music. Pushing your speed of playing beyond what you can hear and grasp is a musical mistake.

Think about it... what happens when you play faster than you can hear? What happens is that your quality control for what you play is gone; you can't judge how well you are playing it if it is so fast and/or complicated that you can't grasp it with your ear... you are "playing deaf".

In the long run, your fingers will eventually play very fast, so what is important now is to learn to conceptually grasp what you hear and play. That just comes with time and learning lots of different kinds of music to give the ear as wide an exposure to music, slow, fast, simple, complex.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#3
tborden001 Try to play with a metronome at slow speed and when you can play passage without mistakes, try it on a little faster tempo, and step by step you will get to the desired speed.
#4
While I believe you can achieve many things and overcome many challenges with a disciplined practise routine I also believe that it's important to recognise that some things are so far beyond your reach that no amount of practise will get you there. I believe it's most beneficial to challenge yourself as much as you can because there's no better way to improve, but you have to accept when you're just not ready for something. There's only so much grinding to a metronome can do.
If you've made little to no progress after 3 weeks of practising one segment then the chances are you're simply not capable of playing it at your current level and wont be getting it any time soon. I don't like to sound so pessimistic, but in time once you're a better player (maybe a year, maybe 2, maybe more) you'll be ready to take the challenge and will actually make steady progress.
#7
Have you taken a lesson or two with someone who can help you with your technique? All of the advice of the previous posters is excellent! An instructor might be able to look at your technique and give you some pointers. These days, instruction can be a Skype call with a myriad of professionals from Berkley or GIT. Best of luck.
#8
I am in the same spot. I love Yngwie and have tried and tried to push myself to even getting close to things he does....and I just can't seem to get there. I joined up here a few days back and I am going to try again and just give myself the time it takes.

one thing I've learned is you are going to need to be VERY mindful of your picking. Notice if parts of the passages are getting "hung up" as you change strings and then look...are you up picking or down picking that note. Things like that will make differences...also how are you learning the song...is it tab, or a guitar pro transcription...make sure the positions make sense in terms of ease and speed of playing it Also minimize any extraneous movement and exaggerated finger positions. I did have a friend years ago who got very fast and it was amazing to see in person...he was so smooth and like his fingers just seemed so relaxed and efficient...he really was great at playing though.

again I am NOT a shredder...I am probably slower than you...but I am studying very hard right now and those are things I am addressing in my own playing...so I hope it helps in a small way.

maybe post a clip?

I am going to start a youtube channel at the very least for private videos for myself so I can track my own progress. Right now I know I won't impress anyone...but maybe if I do one day achieve my goals...the videos will help people see what I did right and wrong moving from below average to pretty good

Last edited by Nadda2 at Feb 21, 2017,
#10
Quote by GoldJim
Have you taken a lesson or two with someone who can help you with your technique? All of the advice of the previous posters is excellent! An instructor might be able to look at your technique and give you some pointers. These days, instruction can be a Skype call with a myriad of professionals from Berkley or GIT. Best of luck.


I've considered doing this as well and have reached out to a few people who taught in the past...but the two I was interested in don't do the skype lessons anymore...I will keep looking....there are tons and I am sure some are right here in other forums offering their services!
#12
GoldJim

thank you. I might have just found an excellent guy on youtube. he says he offers guitar instruction...I am going to note him through facebook. He seems to have very similar interests in players I like and can play in a way that is for sure the direction I feel I want to go.
#13
I remember seeing a John Petrucci (I think it was Petrucci, I could be wrong) tip somewhere, either in the Rock Discipline video or one of his GW columns, where he said if you get close to the speed you want to play a lick at, but can't quite get it to top speed, try setting your metronome faster than the lick you're trying to play (if possible) and attempt it at that speed. Even if you can't play it that fast just yet, try it at that speed and keep at it for a while, then when you try it at the correct tempo, it should feel a bit easier to play. I've used this before, and it's worked for me most of the time, but individual results may vary.
#15
Nadda2 Those are all very valid points and I'm going to take them into consideration a bit more.I'll upload a clip later,that's a good idea though.Do you have any up?also I just noticed that I can play it up to speed :/.That first sweep about 50 seconds in I could play it but not consistently.I'll sometimes get it but completely blank when it comes time execute.I don't know how this happened almost overnight it seems haha
#16
Quote by tborden001
Nadda2 Those are all very valid points and I'm going to take them into consideration a bit more.I'll upload a clip later,that's a good idea though.Do you have any up?also I just noticed that I can play it up to speed :/.That first sweep about 50 seconds in I could play it but not consistently.I'll sometimes get it but completely blank when it comes time execute.I don't know how this happened almost overnight it seems haha


hey when stuff clicks it clicks...maybe you had time to relax and wrap your brain and hands around it. I don't have a youtube channel set up for my playing. I will do it. I have a channel but it's for my work stuff (I am an artist) so I don't want to mix the two right now. I will do it though for sure. listening to a John 5 show right now...so good.
#17
Nadda2 I am in the same spot. I love Yngwie and have tried and tried to push myself to even getting close to things he does....and I just can't seem to get there. I joined up here a few days back and I am going to try again and just give myself the time it takes.
one thing I've learned is you are going to need to be VERY mindful of your picking. Notice if parts of the passages are getting "hung up" as you change strings and then look...are you up picking or down picking that note.

99% of guitarists will be unable to develop the technique and speed of Yngwie, unless they devote years to the task. Do you really need to go there?
For long and fast passages, take a close look at your fingering and picking. The movement of your hands will need to be very relaxed, efficient and fluid. If you can play it slowly, its no guarantee that the pace can be upped, as the 'slow' technique may not allow playing at fast speed. The same principles apply to piano / keyboards and other instruments. In many cases its a matter of sheer playing time and learning more about technique. Move on to more accessible songs that provide incremental challenges to your current standard. Come back to Yngwie in months / years and it may seem easier.

Can you get through the intro riff and intro solo at speed on Now Your Ships Are Burned, from his first Rising Force album ? It has a great feel to it.
Last edited by gbaddeley at Feb 22, 2017,
#18
Start with a very slow tempo on a metronome like 40 bpm. Play without mistake,increase to 45 (or even less),play without mistake increase to 50...Get the point? Also playing in short bursts is great way to increase speed and acuracy (works especially well for scales). That means play slowly than couple of notes play at full speed than continue slowly and than play couple of notes at full speed...
#19
gbaddeley I do realize that most players,(myself obviously included) won't get to an Yngwie level. It's just a long term goal to be able to at least mimic things about it. I know parts of the rising force album but most stuff I play slow. I'll clock myself and see what my rate is. I screw around with now your ships are burned. Little Savage, and far beyond the sun. That said for any real player my work on those would be laughable. But I know small passages but play them probably half speed most times.

I was considering working on some Randy Rhoads and Michael Schenker stuff to work towards Yngwie land...so I totally agree with learning stuff well in a more realistic skill level...and trust me I am not saying Rhoads or Schenker stuff would be easy for me. I already know parts of their songs but again playing them at full speed would be challenging for sure.

I am just coming back to playing after a fairly long break. So fresh starts and hopefully new practice habits and discipline are paramount for me this time!

Thank you!
Last edited by Nadda2 at Feb 22, 2017,
#20
Nadda2

I saw John 5 last year here in Indy, I also saw Vai, Malmsteen, Wylde, Bettencourt and Tobasi live at the Generation Axe concert great shows both of them, I have seen Vai three times before with Whitesnake, Solo, and on the G3 tour with Satriani and Eric Johnson. I saw Satriani live playing solo as well. Players like that can make a man want to swear off the instrument.

tborden001

Just keep in mind that players like Malmsteen, Vai, Satriani, Petrucci etc. are virtuosos they are the best of the best and have been at it for decades, the list of players who have taken lessons from Joe Satriani is impressive to say the least, the ability to play highly technical guitar takes time, Steve vai used to practice for 10hrs a day 3 days a week.
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