#1
Hope im not beating a dead horse here, ive been curious about signal loss and pedals as of now i own 1 pedal, thats it just one, but have been contemplating about getting a EQ in the future. How many pedals does it take until its noticable for a loss of signal, or require i guess a buffer? Im not sure if my pedal has a bypass, its a fender distort. And realize i wont be suffering under these circumstances if i add another pedal to my setup (being 2 pedals) im just making an attempt of shaping my tone. Thanks guys! Can always count on ya!
Squire Bullet Tele
Vintage LemonDrop
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MXR 10-band EQ
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#2
What I typically suggest is when you have cabling of a length over 18 feet, you should get a buffer. Generally if you have a pedal always on you will not need a buffer. Or you will not need one if your pedal is already buffered, but not all buffers are made equal. I think the Fender Distort has a buffer but I am not sure of its quality. I would get something like a Klone for a bit of push and sparkle in your tone, and also because they typically have good buffers.

However a buffer is one of the lesser bits of gear in my opinion, like picks. The amp, guitar, and pedals themselves are much more important.
#3
some of it depends on the pedals in ? and of course the quality of the cables you use. as mentioned the amount of chords and feet used makes a difference. having 1 pedal with a good quality buffer is generally a good idea. when you have a bunch of pedals that are buffered together then there can be issues (again it's about quality). in the case of true bypass if you have enough pedals signal lose can result as well. really a matter of good balance. a couple 3 pedals isn't likely to cause many if any issues
#4
I think ill stick to my one pedal lol, how can i tell if my pedL has a buffer?
Squire Bullet Tele
Vintage LemonDrop
Marshall DSL40c w/V30
MXR 10-band EQ
BOSS Enhancer Eh-2
#5
Lol, don't worry bout it. Odds are if you're sporting enough pedals that it may be an issue, it won't be cause one or more pedals will be buffered.

Just rock the pedals you want, if the issue comes up then deal with it but until then its not something to bother worrying about.
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#6
Signal loss is usually related to cable length, not number of pedals.

You know you pedal is buffered if it's turned off, you remove its power, and the signal goes away. A true bypass pedal (not buffeted) will still pass the signal when it's unpowered.
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#8
You'll experience some pedal loss but honestly, I'd say just go ahead with it and if it gets pad then deal with it. I've worked with 8-10 piece pedalboard and it wasn't a big deal.

There's always things like pedal floor switchers that you can employ when things get too much to be just switched by themselves. Check out Voodoolabs pedal switchers.
#9
Quote by VirgoLife87
I think ill stick to my one pedal lol, how can i tell if my pedL has a buffer?


does it work in bypass mode without power?

if it doesn't, odds are it has a buffer.
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