#1
hello, i have question to pros!
i need to buy new guitar and im decided to buy something like that:
jackson js22 this one there: https://www.thomann.de/gb/jackson_js22_dinky_dka_natural_oiled.htm
or
jackson js32 this one there: https://www.thomann.de/gb/jackson_js32_dinky_dka_no.htm?ref=search_rslt_jackson+js32_356452_10
and the problem begins there, the website saying that js22 have mahogany body and js32 this with floyd rose have something like Nato Body (i rode that nato wood is something like chepest wood similar to mahogany)
so js32 `s worse than js22 ? expensive one is worse than cheper guitar?
Idk. can u advise me, do i need to earn more money for floyd rose js32 or stay with buying js22? this guitars looks amazing but im worrying about that nato body brrr....
#2
What wood the body is made from is the last thing you should worry about on an electric guitar.
My Gear:
Ibanez Jet King 2
Ibanez RGDIX7 MPB
Ibanez GRG 7221
OLP John Petrucci
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Squier Stratocaster (modified)
Harley Benton CLD-41S (Acoustic)

Peavey Vypyr 30.

Boss CH-1 Super Chorus
Boss DD-3 Digital Delay
Boss FRV-1 '63 Fender Reverb
#3
They're both made from the same body wood. Retailers (and manufacturers) are often not accurate as to what a guitar's specs are. Especially when it comes to woods.

Strictly speaking, Nato is likely the more accurate designation. You're never going to get a guitar made from 'true' mahogany, such as Swietenia Macrophylla (the scientific name for what it known as Honduran mahogany) in a $300 guitar. The reason many guitars that are cheap claim to have mahogany bodies or necks is because of marketing. They're actually using a wood that has similar aesthetic and mechanical properties to true mahoganies, but they share no biological relation to Swietenia Macrophylla. The reason for this is because Honduras Mahogany is incredibly expensive and was an endangered species. There is nothing objectively wrong with the wood commonly known as Nato, its just cheaper in price because it's far more readily available yet it has similar physical properties to Swietenia Macrophylla. It has nothing to do with it being objectively worse to construct a guitar from, because it isn't.

And in any case, the wood an electric guitar is made from does not matter to any significant extent when the guitar is amplified. So you really shouldn't worry about it.
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#4
r.a.f.i.rp16 Just curious, why are you so concerned with wood type? On entry level guitars wood is bot an important issue.

Now if you're spending 20k on some special wood that was buried under a glacier for a billion years then ya, you could worry about it.
'16 Gibson LP Standard T, '15 Epi LP Standard with 57/57+ Gibbys
Blackstar S1-45, a few pedals.
#5
I'd buy the JS32 with hopes of a better guitar as it's a higher model number and for the Floyd style trem over the vintage (Strat) style trem on the 22.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#6
In addition to what TDB said, the use Honduran mahogany is only an historical happenstance, as it was imported in big pieces for the furniture trade, and being suitable for furniture, it also had good physical properties for guitar manufacture. Nothing to do with tone, which is subjective anyway, and nato, which is much more common now, might well be superior in any number of ways.
#7
I did not know honduran mohogany was not endangered any more. Thats good to know. If wood type is not a big deal then there are some really good plywoods out there that have good tonal qualities. I believe in the wood type making a difference, but also the volume, shape and quality of the cut.
#8
Just so you know, Grover Jackson tended to use Basswood for his Super Strat's, Many people see the word Basswood and think, Oh cheap guitar, I know pros that would give they're left nut for an old Basswood Super Strat, And here you are all worried about what wood a guitar is made from,
#9
Quote by nastytroll
Just so you know, Grover Jackson tended to use Basswood for his Super Strat's, Many people see the word Basswood and think, Oh cheap guitar, I know pros that would give they're left nut for an old Basswood Super Strat, And here you are all worried about what wood a guitar is made from,


I literally do not care at all what wood a guitar body is made from in terms of tonal characteristics because it makes zero difference.
I like ash for aesthetics and weight preferences, and I like quilted/flame/burl etc tops for aesthetics, but that has nothing to do with tone.
My Gear:
Ibanez Jet King 2
Ibanez RGDIX7 MPB
Ibanez GRG 7221
OLP John Petrucci
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Squier Stratocaster (modified)
Harley Benton CLD-41S (Acoustic)

Peavey Vypyr 30.

Boss CH-1 Super Chorus
Boss DD-3 Digital Delay
Boss FRV-1 '63 Fender Reverb
#11
Quote by Tony Done
geo-rage  I think that neotropical S macrophylla is still listed in CITES Appendix II, so its trade is restricted, but the same species from other parts of the world is not.

pretty sure you are right on this. african mahogany is what is used now for production guitars. the really high end stuff does find it's way into high end small run guitars though. 

mahogany has been dumbed down into a generic term when it comes to guitars. Nato is also known as asian mahogany and does share many of the charactorisitcs of actual mahogany. it actually isn apretty decent material for electric guitars. my BC Rich Eagle has nato wings and sounds great. many of their higher end models use nato. 
#12
Wood only matters on the neck. I thoroughly believe that there is a different feel to a maple neck (my favorite), an ebony neck or a rosewood neck. All of my favorite guitars have had maple necks. A stratocaster with a maple neck is nirvana to me. Nice one piece neck thru the fretboard, simple, classy.
Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
Last edited by NewDayHappy at Feb 23, 2017,
#13
Wow very fast answers! Nice community thanks for answers, sooo i will pick js32 then. I will earn more money and we will see.
#15
Quote by r.a.f.i.rp16
1 more question do i need make something more if i want to play on d standard?

I have no idea. Your question is totally incoherent.
Roses are red
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#16
Quote by nastytroll
Just so you know, Grover Jackson tended to use Basswood for his Super Strat's, Many people see the word Basswood and think, Oh cheap guitar, I know pros that would give they're left nut for an old Basswood Super Strat, And here you are all worried about what wood a guitar is made from,


Ibanez uses Baswood on most of the RG series even on some of the Prestige guitars. Basswood from what I have read is softer than some of the others so it is easy to work with but also will dent easier, I have several Basswood guitars also Nato, Alder, Poplar I'll be damned if i can hear a difference in tone quality.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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#17
I mean js32 have floyr rose, and i play one time on standard one time on drop C, drop B. So better way would be to pick js22? I hord that when you have floyd and want to drop tune from standart to whole step down you must do something special in guts of this guitar? This is true or myth?
#18
Quote by r.a.f.i.rp16
I mean js32 have floyr rose, and i play one time on standard one time on drop C, drop B. So better way would be to pick js22? I hord that when you have floyd and want to drop tune from standart to whole step down you must do something special in guts of this guitar? This is true or myth?

You'll need to re-set up the Floyd whenever you want to play in a different tuning to what the guitar is currently set up for, yes.

If playing in lots of different tunings is something you're going to be doing a lot, get a fixed bridge.

I wouldn't advise that you get a guitar with a Floyd that's so cheap anyway. You get what you pay for with Floyds and the cheap ones are a nightmare to deal with.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
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Shindeiru



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#20
If I had no other choice but to choose from those 2 guitars, yes.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



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#21
Only time body wood really matters is if you want a certain 'grain' for an aesthetic purpose, to be honest. Some woods are a bit more dent and ding resistant than others due to the hardness of the wood, but, with anything made of wood... it's gunna get nicks if you're clunking it into other objects. I had one guitar that would get dents in it from just looking at it...

I have a partscaster that I put together using an awful looking burst finish body due to it being something like 7 pieces with no proper veneer on top, different grain patterns, and probably random chunks of alder, poplar, and basswood glued together. Sounds just as good as my three piece alder body tele. I can appreciate it's ugliness, though, which is why it's a keeper.

Don't sweat the body wood stuff too much.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#23
Is this for a first guitar? If you already have a guitar, I would save up more and buy a better quality guitar. No point in having two entry level guitars.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#25
So again better to take this jackson js22 or this chinese ibanez grg121dx, which guitar would have lower action of strigns? I think i will upgrade later guitar, later (year later or something) i will add better pickoups, but im worrying about the action so much i bought one time guitar with jumbo frets (very high freets, bigger than frets on strat) and this guitar had terible freet buzzing even with good setting. And this js22 looks very good
#26
r.a.f.i.rp16

I'd take the Jackson over the Ibanez the GIO's always looked pretty cheap to me not the the JS look expensive but the build on them looks better than the GRG to me.

But honestly if I were you I'd look for something without a tremolo.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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#27
Quote by Evilnine
r.a.f.i.rp16

I'd take the Jackson over the Ibanez the GIO's always looked pretty cheap to me not the the JS look expensive but the build on them looks better than the GRG to me.

But honestly if I were you I'd look for something without a tremolo.

Why? I wont use tremolo anyway.
#28
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
They're both made from the same body wood. Retailers (and manufacturers) are often not accurate as to what a guitar's specs are. Especially when it comes to woods.

Strictly speaking, Nato is likely the more accurate designation. You're never going to get a guitar made from 'true' mahogany, such as Swietenia Macrophylla (the scientific name for what it known as Honduran mahogany) in a $300 guitar. The reason many guitars that are cheap claim to have mahogany bodies or necks is because of marketing. They're actually using a wood that has similar aesthetic and mechanical properties to true mahoganies, but they share no biological relation to Swietenia Macrophylla. The reason for this is because Honduras Mahogany is incredibly expensive and was an endangered species. There is nothing objectively wrong with the wood commonly known as Nato, its just cheaper in price because it's far more readily available yet it has similar physical properties to Swietenia Macrophylla. It has nothing to do with it being objectively worse to construct a guitar from, because it isn't.

And in any case, the wood an electric guitar is made from does not matter to any significant extent when the guitar is amplified. So you really shouldn't worry about it.


As it turns out, Swietenia Macrophylla isn't incredibly expensive nor is it hard to source, *especially* in Asia. In fact, the primary sources of it these days are Indonesia and Fiji, but it's been transplanted, both in the wild and plantationed, throughout Asia, and is readily availalble, sustainable and not particularly expensive. When it became obvious that availability from Honduras was going to be drying up years ago, seedlings were shipped out and it does extremely well. It matures relatively quickly. "Old growth" is a bit of a misnomer; mahogany trees have a very finite lifespan, and will mature and die on their own if not harvested. While CITES and other regulations (including local) may prevent it from being imported from Honduras, it's easily available worldwide.
#29
Quote by r.a.f.i.rp16
Why? I wont use tremolo anyway.


Exactly if you don't plan on using the tremolo get a tail piece, even a traditionl style tremolo has disadvantages, loss of sustain for one example because you are missing that direct contact between the strings and the wood as well as a huge chunk of wood that is routed out of the back plus dealing with having too silence the springs to aviod the reverb they will make when plam muting etc. If you don't plan on using the tremolo get a guitar without one.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#30
Quote by Evilnine
Exactly if you don't plan on using the tremolo get a tail piece, even a traditionl style tremolo has disadvantages, loss of sustain for one example because you are missing that direct contact between the strings and the wood as well as a huge chunk of wood that is routed out of the back plus dealing with having too silence the springs to aviod the reverb they will make when plam muting etc. If you don't plan on using the tremolo get a guitar without one.


This really doesn't *necessarily * apply. I've been equipping my Floyds with larger brass sustain blocks (see FU-tone and others) as a personal preference. Different materials (and different guitars) will change the characteristics, so you're on your own; there's no set-in-stone change that takes place. But I experience a change in tone and increased sustain (and a change in the overall balance of the guitar, for that matter) with the blocks I've been using. YMMV.
#31
Quote by dspellman
This really doesn't *necessarily * apply. I've been equipping my Floyds with larger brass sustain blocks (see FU-tone and others) as a personal preference. Different materials (and different guitars) will change the characteristics, so you're on your own; there's no set-in-stone change that takes place. But I experience a change in tone and increased sustain (and a change in the overall balance of the guitar, for that matter) with the blocks I've been using. YMMV.



I am by no means condemning Floyd's for sustain loss in fact I use brass big blocks myself and even have a blog on my UG profile about them and various other types of materials used for sustain blocks, I have nearly $400 into one of my OFRs if I include the $200 initial investment into the Floyd plus brass big block, brass spring claw, stainless screws, noiseless springs and titanium saddle blocks from FU Tone, but why would he want bother with that on a cheap guitar that he won't even be using the tremolo? Tremolos do effect sustain so if he is not going to use it why not just get a hard tail. I doubt he will want to invest in a brass block for a trem he doesn't plan to use.

Have you ever tried the stone blocks? I have been curious as to their tone.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

Last edited by Evilnine at Feb 25, 2017,
#32
Quote by Evilnine
I am by no means condemning Floyd's for sustain loss in fact I use brass big blocks myself and even have a blog on my UG profile about them and various other types of materials used for sustain blocks, I have nearly $400 into one of my OFRs if I include the $200 initial investment into the Floyd plus brass big block, brass spring claw, stainless screws, noiseless springs and titanium saddle blocks from FU Tone, but why would he want bother with that on a cheap guitar that he won't even be using the tremolo? Tremolos do effect sustain so if he is not going to use it why not just get a hard tail. I doubt he will want to invest in a brass block for a trem he doesn't plan to use.

Have you ever tried the stone blocks? I have been curious as to their tone.


I've tried tungsten, titanium, steel, copper and brass. Never a stone block. I've not gone any further down the rabbit hole with ups and extras on FRs.

If you're (and by "you're" I mean the general "you're," not the specific) going to never use a Floyd, you may as well not have it on the guitar *unless* it's something that easily goes out of tune. I've got five LP-style guitars with Floyds on them, and aside from the fact that I DO use them, I love the fact that they stay in tune, where it can be a wrestling match to do so with a regular LP.

I should also note that I have a curious relationship with cheap FRs/replicas. I have an Artist Series Samick neck-through superstrat that came with what I assume is a cheap licensed Floyd. Near as I can tell, it's a '92 model guitar. That means that it's had that same cheap Floyd for 25 years. Sometime back I bought a gold OFR to replace it, but decided to wait until the old one died. Amazingly, the old one goes on, working perfectly. I clean it, maintain it, check the knife edges, and the nice new OFR sits on the shelf. I actually have a couple more "replacements" for other cheap guitars sitting on a shelf next to it. But the cheapos are doing very well. And when I say "cheapo," I mean that the guitar's new price was around $299 (Agile AL2000 Floyds). That's barely above the cost of a new Floyd. My basis of comparison for performance is the newish OFR that replaced the original OFR on an Axcess, and the same on another similar guitar.
I'm guessing it will be the saddles that will die first.
#33
dspellman

I agree I had a MIJ licensed Floyd copy it was on my 1993 MIJ Jackson it was made by Takeuchi the model was JT500, these trems generally have a reputation for being junk on most forums. I swapped mine out with the Floyd I mentioned in my earlier post that had all of the upgrades but up until the day I pulled it out of the guitar I never had a single issue with it. It stayed in tune even with heay use and if I let the guitar sit in the case for months it would always be in tune when I pulled it out.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge