Poll: Are Seven Strings with 25"5 scale fine?
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View poll results: Are Seven Strings with 25"5 scale fine?
1. Yes they are.
7 100%
2. Not really, baritones are better.
0 0%
Voters: 7.
#1
I have been playing seven not for a long time, since 2012, before i used to be classical guitar player, played a little bit regular 6 electric string too. What i am asking about is the intonation, i can understand that 8 string 27" scale is necessary thing to be, but do really 7 String need more than 25"5 ? I have had a Schecter hellraiser C 7 with 26"5 scale. Guitar sounded a little brighter on B or A tuning, much Brighter on G#/g and lower compared to my ESP or Ibby. I have sold that schcter due to heavy weight and fat neck, got instead Ibanez rg 7421Pb sbf. However i couldnt find big difference when tuned to B and A tuning as i said. Mostly i have been using a Peavey 6505 and string with 60-64 for B and 68-72 for A.

So the question is, is 25'5 scale lenght enought for B standard and A standard tunning ? (for G# and lower use longer ones? )
#2
I would personally prefer a 7 to have a slightly longer scale length than 25.5 as you don't need quite so heavy strings to tune up to the same tuning.

It's fine for most people though. If it was drastically worse than any other scale length, then they probably wouldn't be as popular as they are.
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#3
Thanks for reply, i actually switched from 26'5 to 25'5 but reason is i preffer Ibanez over Schecter . Tunning down to A standard is fine i guess on 25"5 ;p ?
#4
I have both a 26.5" and a 25.5" 7 string, the longer one is better for riffing, the shorter one is better for soloing, at least for me.
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#5
Quote by rockstar256
Thanks for reply, i actually switched from 26'5 to 25'5 but reason is i preffer Ibanez over Schecter . Tunning down to A standard is fine i guess on 25"5 ;p ?

No reason why you can't.
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#6
They're fine. I have a 25.5 inch 7 and I like it. I'd go for slightly more or a fanned fret guitar if I had to custom order one, but mine has done G# without too much issues.
#7
Carvin ran with 25.5" seven strings for years, only moving to longers cales (27") recently.
Variax guitars have been 25.5" even though they run tunings as much as an octave down. They recently introduced (at NAMM in January) a 27" Variax.
Agile has 25.5", 27" ,28.65" and even 30" scale guitars in 7's and up. Mine is a 27" seven.

The point of the longer scale isn't that the 25.5" scale doesn't *work* -- it's just that the low strings sound better in a longer scale.
Think of a nine-foot grand piano compared to an upright spinet. It's the bottom five strings that really tell the tale; you can really hear the separation between those keys on the grand, but almost no difference between the same keys on the little spinet. It's all due to string length.
Last edited by dspellman at Feb 22, 2017,
#8
Yeah i get the piano , played it in childhood, comapred to some smaller pianos the bigger one had clearer low notes. ESP and Ibanez seem to produce mostly 25"5 seven string, i m not into schecter because of heavy bodies and thick necks. Had hellraiser c7 and sold it
#9
Depends what tuning you're in imo. I have a 26.5 and a 25.5. I wouldn't want to go lower than A or Ab on my 25.5.

Id deffo consider getting a fanned fret in the future, for best of both worlds!
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#11
I am not a huge fan of schecter, but the banshee 7 that I had actually had a very comfortable neck. Might be worth a look. I am currently looking into the Agile 7s.
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#12
yes. if you like how it feels then it's fine.
I keep one 25.5 7 around for giggles.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#13
I have a Schecter Damien Elite 7 26.5 and I wish it were 25.5 I don't really tune down lower than D standard
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#15
Quote by rockstar256
Evilnine

You mean A standard ? right ;p


LOL yeah can you tell I'm a six string guy? I have the one 7 just for kicks but my other 13 are sixers!
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#16
One thing further -- a 27" or 28" scale guitar is not necessarily a baritone guitar. Baritone is a tuning, not a scale length. In fact, most 27" scale seven-strings are NOT tuned to Baritone levels, but to ordinary E standard. There's no standard for baritone tunings, but you're usually tuning a fourth or a fifth down. Jazz players will often use a 27" scale guitar tuned to E standard, preferring the long scale just to produce better clarity on the bottom notes or to give them a bit more space to work with on the upper frets. Jim Soloway's series of Swan guitars was a good example of that.
#17
Quote by dspellman
Variax guitars have been 25.5" even though they run tunings as much as an octave down. They recently introduced (at NAMM in January) a 27" Variax.


I saw that too. http://line6.com/variax-modeling-guitars/shuriken Besides being rather fugly, it doesn't have 7 strings. I think it's baritone tuned, though with the Variax tech, you can choose the tuning of your choice. I think Line 6 missed the purpose of the 7th and 8th strings here. The users of extended ranged guitars aren't just looking for a lower tuning, they want more tonal possibilities for vertical and horizontal playing on the fretboard. IMHO, this is a product that won't really sell. That said, the Variax is a great guitar for the guy who wants one axe to do it all in a varied playing environment.

Edit, sorry for the kind of OT post.
Last edited by GoldJim at Feb 24, 2017,
#18
Quote by GoldJim
I saw that too. http://line6.com/variax-modeling-guitars/shuriken Besides being rather fugly, it doesn't have 7 strings. I think it's baritone tuned, though with the Variax tech, you can choose the tuning of your choice. I think Line 6 missed the purpose of the 7th and 8th strings here. The users of extended ranged guitars aren't just looking for a lower tuning, they want more tonal possibilities for vertical and horizontal playing on the fretboard. IMHO, this is a product that won't really sell. That said, the Variax is a great guitar for the guy who wants one axe to do it all in a varied playing environment.

Edit, sorry for the kind of OT post.


There are Variax players who have found that tuning their guitars in fifths (via the Variax technology) will extend their range into seven and even eight-string territory. When used with VDI cables and pieces like the Helix or HD500, it's actually possible to change tunings on the fly, which gives you some interesting possibilities regarding extending your range well beyond fixed tune instruments. Obviously this isn't going to do much for the player who wants to use all seven or eight (or nine or ten) strings to run extended arpeggios at one spot on the guitar neck.
#19
Quote by dspellman
There are Variax players who have found that tuning their guitars in fifths (via the Variax technology) will extend their range into seven and even eight-string territory. When used with VDI cables and pieces like the Helix or HD500, it's actually possible to change tunings on the fly, which gives you some interesting possibilities regarding extending your range well beyond fixed tune instruments. Obviously this isn't going to do much for the player who wants to use all seven or eight (or nine or ten) strings to run extended arpeggios at one spot on the guitar neck.


I know folks who tune their guitars to 5ths (E A D G C F) as well. So they're using the Variax tech to modify the tuning, but the actual tuning is still standard or they are actually tuning their guitars to 5ths? It can be confusing. I like the Variax and have come so close to just pulling the trigger and getting one rather than having to lug 2 or 3 guitars to a gig. For a cover band, I've seen them work very well, but I would go Line 6 end to end at that point, and I'm not sure if I'm ready for that yet. Thanks for the info. I look forward to trying out the Shuriken.
#20
Quote by GoldJim
I know folks who tune their guitars to 5ths (E A D G C F) as well. So they're using the Variax tech to modify the tuning, but the actual tuning is still standard or they are actually tuning their guitars to 5ths? It can be confusing. I like the Variax and have come so close to just pulling the trigger and getting one rather than having to lug 2 or 3 guitars to a gig. For a cover band, I've seen them work very well, but I would go Line 6 end to end at that point, and I'm not sure if I'm ready for that yet. Thanks for the info. I look forward to trying out the Shuriken.


You can use the Variax tech to modify the tuning and leave the actual tuning standard if you wish. That's the easy way.