#1
What is a two part / three part harmony?
or a "third" and "fifth"?

I've read it somewhere when I was looking into harmonizer pedals, but haven't figured out what they mean...
Gear:
- ESP LTD MH-50
- Strandberg OS 7
- A cheap fender strat knock-off not worth naming
- Garageband
- Boss GT-1
- Potato
#2
Third and fifth are intervals (the distance between two notes). Most chords have root, third and fifth in them. For example C major is C E G. C is the root, and the distance between the root (C) and E is a third (which means E is the third of the chord) and the distance between the root (C) and G is a fifth (which means G is the fifth of the chord).

Two/thee part harmony means that there are two/three voices, so basically there are two/three different melodic lines (in other words, two/three notes are played at the same time).

Usually music theory lessons teach you to write harmony in four parts (because the standard choir has four different voices - soprano, alto, tenor and bass, and I guess it's the easiest way to learn voice leading).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Before buying a harmonizer pedal you will need to understand the relationship of keys and notes. On most harmonizing pedals you have to choose a key and then the actual interval of notes of the scale you want to harmonize. I have an old BOSS Super Shifter PS-5 harmonizer for guitar as well as two different vocal harmonizers (Digitech Vocalist II and TC Helicon GT-X) and you have to know some minor theory to make them work properly.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#4
Quote by Rickholly74
Before buying a harmonizer pedal you will need to understand the relationship of keys and notes. On most harmonizing pedals you have to choose a key and then the actual interval of notes of the scale you want to harmonize. I have an old BOSS Super Shifter PS-5 harmonizer for guitar as well as two different vocal harmonizers (Digitech Vocalist II and TC Helicon GT-X) and you have to know some minor theory to make them work properly.


Yea, thankfully I didn't go and buy a harmonizer (I bought a multi-effects processor instead "Boss GT-1"). This machine gives me the opportunity to add more effects without the cost (yes I know the drawback is that digital effects dont sound as great as analog (or at least thats what the GC staff said), but I don't intend to play on stage or anything. Just want to make music from my desk)

Thank you both for explaining to me
Gear:
- ESP LTD MH-50
- Strandberg OS 7
- A cheap fender strat knock-off not worth naming
- Garageband
- Boss GT-1
- Potato
#5
BTW, a harmonizer would most likely be digital any way.

Digital effects don't sound any better or worse than analog effects. They just sound different. For example the repeats of a digital delay sound much clearer than of an analog delay (though a lot of people like the way analog or tape delay colors the sound of the repeats) and digital delays potentially have a much longer delay time. Digital delays also give you more versatility and many can pretty accurately model an analog delay sound.

When it comes to multi effects, yes, individual pedals probably sound a bit better, but that doesn't necessarily have to do with digital vs analog.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115