#1
Cannot provide pictures at the moment as my phone is god-knows-where, but I'll do my best to describe the situation.

I have an electric guitar, it's a "Jackson JS11 Dinky Electric Guitar" or at least an older version of that guitar, and the bridge is a Floyd Rose.

So, stupidly, I decided that I'd replace the strings all on my own. (I'm completely new to guitar, by the way.) Anyways, I read an online tutorial and start to loosen the tuning keys, and I take the first strings off, and take off the big screw thing on the bridge of the guitar, and take the string off. I then do the same for the second one, but when I start to adjust the tuning key for the third one...*snap* and the string broke. I look down at the bridge and notice it's...sunk into the guitar.

Help, please? I am panicking.
#2
That's what happens with floyds. You need to loosen all the strings about equally.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#3
its fine...I think... from what you are describing it sounds like its just the springs on the bridge. The Floyd type bridge is always under tension from the springs in the back of the guitar, the strings counter that tension and the bridge "floats" in tune at the balance point being able to raise or lower the pitch by using the whammy bar on the bridge, as you remove strings there is less tension pulling back against the bridge springs, that added tension is likely what broke your string and is also what is pulling the bridge down into the body cavity - this is normal. Once you replace all the strings and get everything tuned up it will go back to normal.

If you use the whammy bar you can manually counter the pressure from the springs and raise the bridge as needed for access to screws and such. In the future you can either change one string at a time or put a wedge under the end of the bridge to hold it roughly in place during a string change.
#4
Quote by BlayhBlah
Cannot provide pictures at the moment as my phone is god-knows-where, but I'll do my best to describe the situation.

I have an electric guitar, it's a "Jackson JS11 Dinky Electric Guitar" or at least an older version of that guitar, and the bridge is a Floyd Rose.

So, stupidly, I decided that I'd replace the strings all on my own. (I'm completely new to guitar, by the way.) Anyways, I read an online tutorial and start to loosen the tuning keys, and I take the first strings off, and take off the big screw thing on the bridge of the guitar, and take the string off. I then do the same for the second one, but when I start to adjust the tuning key for the third one...*snap* and the string broke. I look down at the bridge and notice it's...sunk into the guitar.

Help, please? I am panicking.


No problem. You didn't break the guitar. You just discovered that a Floyd Rose bridge is balanced on one side by string tension and on the other by spring tension. It's like a teeter-totter. One kid jumps off and the other kid slams to the ground. Keep checking out the YouTube vids and you'll find that most folks put a piece of wood, a pad of Post-It Notes or something similar under the butt-end of the Floyd to keep it from tilting all the way back if they're only changing one string at a time. I routinely remove the cover over the spring cavity, loosen the strings and remove the springs (watch the "t's" and "p's" here) from the bridge itself, and sometimes even remove the bridge from the guitar for cleaning. I'll then install all six strings on the bridge itself OUTSIDE the guitar and then reinstall the bridge, attach the springs, put a piece of wood under the butt end of the Floyd and then bring the strings up to tension. Make sure that you have the locking nut screws completely out of the guitar (and the clamps off) before you do all of this.
#5
Okay...so I followed your instructions, everything's going as it should be, however there's these little square things on the bridge that fit into a hole, and two of them have fallen out. It this normal or have I actually broken it now?

Thanks everyone for the current info, as well, sorry to be so annoying.
#7
Rule #1. Don't let the little fiddly pieces fall out.

Rule #2. If the little fiddly pieces fall out, put them back. Correctly. *

Rule #3. Don't panic.

Rule #4. Don't forget your towel.


*Youtube videos can help you put them back, but only one in five actually do it correctly, so you have to figure out which one and just follow that one. The rest are charlatans, pretenders and knaves who slap YouTube videos up just so that they can monetize them by advertising junk you'd never buy anyway.
Last edited by dspellman at Feb 24, 2017,
#8
Quote by dspellman
Rule #1. Don't let the little fiddly pieces fall out.

Rule #2. If the little fiddly pieces fall out, put them back. Correctly. *

Rule #3. Don't panic.

Rule #4. Don't forget your towel.


*Youtube videos can help you put them back, but only one in five actually do it correctly, so you have to figure out which one and just follow that one. The rest are charlatans, pretenders and knaves who slap YouTube videos up just so that they can monetize them by advertising junk you'd never buy anyway.


Ha! Hitchhiker's guide reference.