#1
Basically, just looking for an pragmatic amp that doesn't have fancy, flashy stuff like built-in pedal effects. Just the classic gain, mids, bass, treble and volume settings. Tried Googling "Simple guitar amp" and only got practice amps and stuff that doesn't fit my criteria, but I feel like that amp is out there. I just don't have the means to find it.
#2
Fender Blues Junior or Maybe Orange OR15 with a V30 cab. If you post your budget and style, you would get more relevant answers. VOX AC15 is also a good amp with onboard reverb and tremolo.
#3
Gab_Azz

"If you post your budget and style, you would get more relevant answers"

Good point. I'm open to any budget, really. I like to save up money, so even a $2000 amp could come into my hands with enough patience and time.
As for style, I don't know what exactly you mean by this, but I assume you mean "playing style" or "genre of music I play", right? If that is what you mean, I just play "fuzz rock" (not sure what else to call it.)

Also, as I said before, I don't care for special, built-in effects. That includes stuff like reverb and tremolo.
Vox sounds like a good one otherwise, though.
Last edited by CanIBeADemon at Feb 26, 2017,
#4
I would be looking at a trad style tube Fender of some kind, or simlar. I gigged with a Peavey Classic 30 and Fender Blues Deluxe, both of which had nice reverb and accepted pedals well. The clean channel on the BD wasn't very loud, turning up the volume just yielded more compression.
#5
For $1-2K for an amp*, there is pretty much a universe of amps available. The downside from your perspective is that as you go up the price ladder, builders tend to add more channels and controls and other bells & whistles.

To me, "fuzz rock" probably means bands like Kyuss, QotSA, Boris, Earth, High on Fire, Sleep, Colour Haze, Sunn, etc. Is that the right neighborhood?

If so, the first that springs to mind is something from Orange.


* combo or head only?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
dannyalcatraz

"The downside from your perspective is that as you go up the price ladder, builders tend to add more channels and controls and other bells & whistles."

Oh, yeah. That's true.
I'm going to just go with $600~ then, if that amount or less can get me the amp I'm looking for.

"To me, "fuzz rock" probably means bands like Kyuss, QotSA, Boris, Earth, High on Fire, Sleep, Colour Haze, Sunn, etc. Is that the right neighborhood?"

Kyuss and QOTSA, I like them. But by "fuzz" I mean more like Ventures (Example: their song "Fuzzy and Wild") or The Doors ("Hello I Love You" is a good example song). That simple, buzzy, sputtering tone.

"* combo or head only?"

Definitely going with combo. Hope I'm not shooting myself in the foot by saying that.
Last edited by CanIBeADemon at Feb 26, 2017,
#7
OK, the picture is MUCH clearer.

The usual suspects are going to work fine: most Fenders or Voxes, the Vintage line from Carvin, Peavey Delta Blues 115, and the like on the lower end, Dr Z, Matchless, Tone King on the higher end.

That "fuzz" will come via a good fuzz pedal. Maybe something like a SolidGold FX Sasori.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#8
dannyalcatraz

Thanks a lot, man.
Who knew it'd be right under my nose? I feel silly for asking this question now.
Don't worry about the pedal, by the way. I already have a Big Muff and a Foxx Tone Machine. My Line 6 Spider IV amp just wasn't cutting it though. After getting a feeling of the music I want to play by now, this old practice amp just isn't going to suffice anymore.
Last edited by CanIBeADemon at Feb 26, 2017,
#9
Those fuzzes may be good, but they may not deliver that particular retro tone experience you seek. I'm pretty sure the Sasori will.



That said, don't do too much pedal shopping until you get the amp sorted. As I thought about it, I realized I should also mention Quilter amps. They're high-quality, non-modeling SS amps that take pedals well, and are generally voiced like Fenders, etc.

What is your guitar situation?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
Quote by CanIBeADemon
dannyalcatraz

Thanks a lot, man.
Who knew it'd be right under my nose? I feel silly for asking this question now.
Don't worry about the pedal, by the way. I already have a Big Muff and a Foxx Tone Machine. My Line 6 Spider IV amp just wasn't cutting it though. After getting a feeling of the music I want to play by now, this old practice amp just isn't going to suffice anymore.


Do not feel discouraged that you asked, when I was younger I bought stuff and tried to make it sound right later ending up wasting a lot of money. The AC15 ships with great speakers, either the Celestion greenback or AlNiCo blues. But the speaker in the blues junior, either eminence or celestion, is not that great in the regular black amp. The tweed edition is equipped with a Jensen ceramic speaker that is great. This should save you about 80 to a 100 on a speaker. I cannot speak about the other amps dannyalcatraz mentioned as I have experience with only these.
#11
dannyalcatraz

First off, thanks for showing me the Sasori. It sounds a lot closer to my preferred sound.
And from what I see from a quick glance on Google, it's well under $200.

Also, I'm sorry, but what exactly do you mean by "guitar situation"?
#12
CanIBeADemon

What guitar are you using? While you can play virtually anything with any guitar & amp combo if you know what you're doing, some tones are easier to get to with Gear XYZ vs Gear ABC.

The tone you seek is more easily achieved with singlecoils, be they Strat style, Teles, Lipsticks, P90s, and the like. In the humbucker family, you'd want something like a Fillertron (Gretsch/TV Jones, etc. style), HB-sized P90 or some such.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
dannyalcatraz

Right now, just a Peavey Raptor International that I've been playing for almost 3 years. Saving up to get a new guitar soon though.

I kind of figured that Strats and Teles were some of the ideal guitars for fuzzy stuff. I'll definitely look into that.

Gab_Azz
I did read your post. I just have no proper responses for it. Thanks for posting though.
#14
Gab_Azz' point is- I believe- is do your homework, because some amps come with speakers that will truly set them apart from the crowd for the tone you seek. I am not a speaker guru, though...

If you go head & cab, you can match that without having to do a speaker swap.

The Peavey...it's a stratclone, right?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#15
dannyalcatraz

You and Gab are both modest. I respect that.
Even though you both say things like that though, you've both helped me out a lot.
Especially with that fuzz pedal you showed me. 100% interested in that.
Thanks, guys.

And yeah, the Peavey is a Strat clone.
#16
Modesty, nothing! I've been playing guitar a couple of decades, and just this Christmas bought my second amp. And I've never delved into the world of speaker swaps, tube upgrades, etc.

Guitar is one of the most complex instruments in the world to play, and is simultaneously the most popular. Because of that, the world is full of all kinds of gear...and possible gear modifications. Nobody knows it all.

Modesty is when I say this: even in the stuff I feel I know well, I also know that my expertise is still only covering a sliver of guitar history.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#19
I'll chime in. dannyalcatraz has provided excellent information. I know you're looking for something simple, but if you're going from a rhythm part to a lead part, you're going to be looking to boost. When it comes to cutting through in a live situation, it's very different from the way you would do it in a studio, so a small amount of versatility can go a long way. An amp with a drive channel that you can use a simple one-button switch to go to will allow you to choose when you switch to a solo. Alternatively, you could put a clean boost like the TC Electronics Rush Booster into the effects loop. This will let you maintain your same tone, but get an X db boost when you go from single note lines or arpeggios.

The reason that I use a a separate channel for lead and rhythm most of the time is because I change my base tone to cut through. Something you'll find as you play live with other players is that a change in your EQ can do as much as more volume when it comes to being heard.
#20
I have been playing for well over a decade so I try to help others where I wish I had help in my earlier years of playing. When setting up a rig you should have priorities. First you should get a decent tube amp and a decent guitar. Most entry level tube amps come with lower grade speakers. Manufacturers do this on purpose not only to sell them a few bucks cheaper, but to make distinction from the basic models and their flagships. A 100 euro/dollar speaker is the most important upgrade at this point, more important than any pedal (you may wish to get pedals before the speaker but the speaker has more impact on your tone).

What I ended up doing was buying pedals as it is easier to save up to buy a pedal rather than a tube amp. Then when I bought a tube amp I found out that most of them were useless with my tube amps. Either I did not need them or they did not work with that setup.

Since you claimed you are willing to put aside some money for the right amp, I suggest going for a tube amp. Around 600 new, you will find decent stuff like 15W amps. These are considered as loud enough for a gig. 40W amps generally have more features such as 2 channels and have more clean headroom. Expect to spend close to 800 for something like this. Pedals, especially fuzz pedals, work better with tube amps. Clean tube amps like Fenders tend to take pedals very well.
#22
CanIBeADemon

Here is the advice I wish someone told me when I was looking to buy my first amp : save and buy a quality tube amp. If you buy a cheap amp you're going to waste money on pedals to fix that cheap tone over the years and you will end up replacing it. Find a tone you like and find out what amp it is - here's a hint, if an amp isn't being used by professional bands - it's probably not good enough. Check Premier Guitar rig rundowns on you tube and google your favorite acts and check what they're using on stage.

If your budget is under $1000, then buy secondhand.

Also, always play the amp first - don't buy blind.

I would suggest renting a few amps to get a feel for what you want - I did this last time and it really helped.
#23
reverb66 

I just now realized that the poor wording in my OP makes it seem like I'm a beginner who's never bought any gear before. Your reply makes that very apparent.

I already have an amp and have been playing guitar for 2 years. What I meant is that I'm looking for an amp that has no special effects or flashy stuff. Just the basic, pragmatic settings (bass, mids, treble, etc). Again, NO built-in pedal settings like reverb and whatever. Like, if I wanted those settings, I'd get an actual, physical pedal for it.

Still, thanks for all of your answers. Especially Danny's. Wouldn't have known about the Sasori fuzz otherwise.
Last edited by CanIBeADemon at Mar 7, 2017,
#24
Generally speaking most of your smaller tube/valve amps will be pretty bare bones,  Hell for that matter some of your big suckers can be pretty bare bones also,
Meaning you don't start seeing the added effects and other BS till you get into the Solid State stuff, and the reason behind that more often than not is they're trying to model a tube amp, then throw in a bunch of effects for shits and giggles, 
 The reason Tube amps don't do it is because the circuit wont allow it unless you bastardize it into a Hybrid,  Just don't go there, as it never turns out well.  Meaning those that build tube amps figure, It already sounds like a tube amp and if you want effects buy an effects peddle ya big dummy,
Personally I wont even consider an amp with less than 2 channels and my main work horses are 3 channels,  anything less is a one trick pony, and I just have too many tricks to work with one,  But that's not to say someone in one of those worship group thingies might not be content droning the same rhythm licks for the next 30 years,  To each his own I always say, 
Meaning don't be intimated by a few extra knobs,  Of my work horses one has 21 knobs and 10 switches not counting the power and standby, The other 22 and 5, and we're talking about tube amps here,  
So ya wanna know a secret?  I don't use them all, Once set to my liking about the only ones I use are master and channel volume, Gain and sometimes a bit of EQ setting depending on venue,  Hell some may have 10 year old dust on them. 
Although I do wish I still had a few of those amps I had 40 years ago.   Damn that would have been some bank right there, 
Last edited by nastytroll at Mar 7, 2017,
#25
Meaning you don't start seeing the added effects and other BS till you get into the Solid State stuff, and the reason behind that more often than not is they're trying to model a tube amp, then throw in a bunch of effects for shits and giggles,

Well, to be 100% honest, you WILL see reverb on certain tube amps...sometimes quite good reverb.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#26
CanIBeADemon I'd say look at Orange amps - no crazy bells and whistles, lots of tube goodness and great tone as long as you go tube. 
If money is not an issue - Rockerverb or one of the traditional Marshalls, JCM800, Plexi or Bluesbreaker.

If you like more features, which I do, Mesa Mark V. 

For something on a budget that is plain and simple and sounds good - look up EH Mig 50, Peavey Classic 30 or Classic 50, Laney LG15, 30 of 50 watts, maybe Peavey Valveking.