#1
Guys, my strings are way too hard, while not even being tuned to standard. I'm completely new to guitars, can someone help me out?
I'm afraid that if I try to tune them upto pitch, they may break.
Last edited by coolhammas at Mar 1, 2017,
#2
What gauge strings are you using on what guitar?
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#3
First, go to a guitar store and try the other guitars and see how stiff they are by comparison.

Second, make sure that you're not trying to tune your strings to the next highest octave (yup, they'll break).

Third, take N1ghtmar3C1n3ma 's advice and double check what gauge strings you've put on your guitar. If you start with .009's (they might say 942 or .009-.042, etc.), you should have fairly compliant strings to work with.

You should expect that the strings will hurt your finger tips for a while. As you play more, you'll develop callouses on those finger tips and they won't seem so "hard."
#4
I have .010's
BC Rich Bich with a normal bridge
Ernie Ball Slim top heavy bottom

BTW, the strings would get too hard without even tuning up to pitch, like my low E is tuned to C, but as hard as a standard tuned one would be.
Last edited by coolhammas at Mar 1, 2017,
#6
First, if you're new to guitars, drop down a gauge to plain old 9's. Don't listen to some salesman who will sell you heavy bottoms because he thinks it's way more metal.
Second, bring ALL of the strings up close to pitch (bottom ones first) and then finish them off (low to high). Then evaluate them.

And third -- have fun with the Bich. I have a 10-string sitting in storage that dates to 1981 that Neal Moser insists he recognizes.
#7
dspellman
I'd like to go with the same strings, are any adjustments in the saddle required?
These strings are new, previously, I had 9's, they worked fine.
#8
Quote by coolhammas
I have .010's
BC Rich Bich with a normal bridge
Ernie Ball Slim top heavy bottom

BTW, the strings would get too hard without even tuning up to pitch, like my low E is tuned to C, but as hard as a standard tuned one would be.


Moving from 9's to 10's isn't normally that big a jump, but the lower strings on the heavy bottoms are quite a bit thicker and made for drop tuning. A set of 9's would have had a 42 bottom E and you're using a 52. Standard 10's come with a 46 bottom E. If you're tuning to something like Drop C, those would be all right. The other problem is that your nut slot is probably not going to accommodate the 52 E string or the 42 A string. You may have to adjust or replace your nut. You should also raise your action slightly as the string is thicker and will vibrate wider. You'll want to check your neck relief as well.
Last edited by GoldJim at Mar 1, 2017,
#9
Quote by coolhammas
dspellman
I'd like to go with the same strings, are any adjustments in the saddle required?
These strings are new, previously, I had 9's, they worked fine.


Yeah you have gone from a set of plain slinkys to a hybrid set with much thicker bass strings designed for drop tuning, no wonder they feel extra thick.

I use those 10-52's on a Les Paul for drop D, which has a shorter scale length than your BC Rich and the bass strings are pretty damn tight.
My Gear:
Ibanez Jet King 2
Ibanez RGDIX7 MPB
Ibanez GRG 7221
OLP John Petrucci
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Squier Stratocaster (modified)
Harley Benton CLD-41S (Acoustic)

Peavey Vypyr 30.

Boss CH-1 Super Chorus
Boss DD-3 Digital Delay
Boss FRV-1 '63 Fender Reverb
#11
Generally, heavier gauge strings are done in mind with lower tunings. I run the Ernie Ball 12-56 set for my Drop B tunings. From what I've gathered, D standard is about the highest you can go. OTOH, Mike Eizenger from Incubus used 13 gauge sets in standard tuning---until he had wrist surgery.

Personally, I find 10-46 serves me well up through drop C, but YMMV. There's not a wrong answer, but thicker gauge sets might not always serve you well for standard tuning. It's personal preference. I know other people would use thicker gauges for Drop C. I wouldn't go past a 10 gauge set for Standard tuning.
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Last edited by bjgrifter at Mar 2, 2017,
#12
Quote by coolhammas
GoldJim
Does that mean that I can NEVER tune them to standard?


Absolutely not. You can get extra heavy strings and tune them to standard, but you're going to have to do some set up and bends will be nearly impossible for your current finger strength. Jazz and some blues players like to use heavier strings. Jazz folks because it can give them a rounder tone and they don't really bend that often and blues players who play very physically, like SRV.

As bjgrifter points out, there's no right or firm way to do things. The only thing to remember is that the heavier the set of strings, the more tension you'll have at a given tuning. That's why people who tune way down like a heavier string so it won't give as much slack where a player who uses a lighter string wants that slack, usually for bends.

This video might give you some insight.

Last edited by GoldJim at Mar 2, 2017,
#14
Quote by coolhammas
GoldJim
Does that mean that I can NEVER tune them to standard?


You can use them. I've used 12-56 in standard e just to try it. You're probably going to need a setup, but that's to be expected.
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#15
Just get a set of regular .010 strings and not the hybrid, if you prefer the hybrids be prepaired to have a harder time making bends on the low strings in standard
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