Poll: Is there a reason for accousic guitars with shred necks?
Poll Options
View poll results: Is there a reason for accousic guitars with shred necks?
Yes
14 88%
No
2 13%
Voters: 16.
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#1
Okay, so when I was a kid, I was given an accousic guitar, even though it was left handed, broken strap holds, and restringed as a right handed guitar. What I'm wondering is why would they make it with shred necks? For those that don't know what I'm talking about, shred necks are those that have thin fretboards, small fret radius, perfectly flat fretboard, and just overall are optomized for shred guitar. Why would an accousic need a shred neck? It's even weirder when it's harder to blay barre chords on suck a flat neck. Just, why?
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#2
Oops, I accidentally clicked Electric instead of Accoustic. Sorry.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#3
You never see joe pass shred? That guy was mark Holcomb before mark Holcomb.

The better question is why the first electric guitars didn't have shred necks. And the answer is that the first electric guitarists were pussies.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#4
Why?

1) There are acoustic shredders out there.

2) Occasionally, electric shredders forget to pay their electric bill.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
Relax. There have been "shredder" necks on acoustics since long before there were shredders. A lot of older guitars show up with flat or nearly flat fretboards.
#7
I primarily play electric, but when I pick up an acoustic, I want something that feels familiar. My dean acoustic has a 12" fretboard radius and a C neck profile akin to a modern Strat. I guess it could be considered a shredding type neck although not really. It just plays nice and is comfortable.
#8
Oh, so there is a point. Probably not the best for a "beginner guitar," though.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#9
My Dean has REALLY thin neck for an acoustic. I love it ... a lot of people just like thin necks.
#10
Flat frets are the thing I'm most confused about. Accousics are usually used for chords and arpegios, which at least for me I need some curve to account for my not flexible fingers.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#11
Quote by gogiregion
Flat frets are the thing I'm most confused about. Accousics are usually used for chords and arpegios, which at least for me I need some curve to account for my not flexible fingers.


Don't try a classical guitar then. Those fretboards are completely flat.
#12
Noted, although my accoustic is completely flat.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#13
Quote by gogiregion
Okay, so when I was a kid, I was given an accousic guitar, even though it was left handed, broken strap holds, and restringed as a right handed guitar. What I'm wondering is why would they make it with shred necks? For those that don't know what I'm talking about, shred necks are those that have thin fretboards, small fret radius, perfectly flat fretboard, and just overall are optomized for shred guitar. Why would an accousic need a shred neck? It's even weirder when it's harder to blay barre chords on suck a flat neck. Just, why?
OK, the average neck redius on today's acoustics is round about 12"". which is typical of most electrics as well. The only way I can imagine you having an issue with neck radius, is if you're used to the 8" & 9" radii of vintage Tele and Strat necks.

Add to that, the fact the most modern acoustics have a somewhat standardized neck width of about 1 11/16" at the nut.

From my experience, acoustics generally have just a but stouter profile than your typical electric, (although they come in the same profiles, er "cross sections").

AFAIK, the more expensive Ibanez (RG ?) have very thin necks, which can actually tire some people's hands out, trying to play them.

It's the same principle as to why trucks have fat rimmed steering wheels. The manufacturers expect the trucks to be driven long hours, and thin rims,such as those of a passenger car, would case driver's hands fatigue and cramping problems.


Additionally, slightly thicker necks allow for more leverage, which is useful for dealing with the heavier string tension of an acoustic.

All that being said, I haven't run into acoustics with what you're calling "shred necks", although I expect some similarity between acoustic necks should ease the transition from one type of guitar to another, should the need arise.

And BTW, barre chords are always harder on an acoustic, but it's mostly due to the increased string tension, not the fret board radius.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 3, 2017,
#15
Yeah. I'm not really much into accostics, I pretty much exclusively play electrics. Mostly strats. It just seems weird to me for my accoustic to have such a flat and thin neck (it might actually be curved inwards) compared to my electric. I mean, sometimes I shred on my accoustic just because why not, but it is SO HARD to play barre chords on it. It's also poorly tuned on the high strings due to its fixed bridge. It's honestly bad for everything except open chords, which are also not that in tune. LOL
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#16
You just need to get good. It's not that hard to barre on a flat radius. Some acoustics have a wider fretboard. That just takes some getting used too.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#17
Quote by gogiregion
Yeah. I'm not really much into accostics, I pretty much exclusively play electrics. Mostly strats. It just seems weird to me for my accoustic to have such a flat and thin neck (it might actually be curved inwards) compared to my electric. I mean, sometimes I shred on my accoustic just because why not, but it is SO HARD to play barre chords on it. It's also poorly tuned on the high strings due to its fixed bridge. It's honestly bad for everything except open chords, which are also not that in tune. LOL
To be perfectly blunt, this is the same whimpering we always here from electric players when first undertaking the acoustic guitar. Succinctly put, "this guitar makes my fingeys hurt, boo hoo".
#19
It doesn't make my fingers hurt, really. It's more that I can't do barre chords on it. I actually started on an accoustic.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#20
Quote by gogiregion
It doesn't make my fingers hurt, really. It's more that I can't do barre chords on it. I actually started on an accoustic.
Well, then you either have to get the guitar set up properly, or if it already is, tough it out while you're building up the necessary strength.

If you have a highly radiused neck on your electrics, then chances are, you're lifting the center of the barre on the flatter neck out of habit.

A simple reality is, you'll find it very difficult to damned near impossible to find an acoustic with an 8" or 9" radius neck. Unless of course, you have the big bucks to have it built for you.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 3, 2017,
#21
Yeah. That's probably true. It was a crappy starter accoustic if that tells you anything. It's even got a single polepiece bridge. Trust me, I've looked for a way to tune it. It's just that bad. I honestly am fine for now with just not having a working accoustic.

Edit: It's not just habbit, my fingers physically can't bar the fret properly. I've looked and it's either 100% flat, or curved inwards.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
Last edited by gogiregion at Mar 3, 2017,
#22
When you're Amish, but need to be brutal too. That's why.
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Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#23
Quote by gogiregion


Edit: It's not just habbit, my fingers physically can't bar the fret properly. I've looked and it's either 100% flat, or curved inwards.


No it isn't. The only flat fret boards are classical guitars. If you have a regular acoustic, it has a radius. Tell us what brand and model you have and I'm sure someone can look up the radius.
#24
It's an off brand cheapo one I got. It even came stringed as right hand, and labeled as such, but had the strap things as left hand.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#25
I scalloped my acoustic, how's that for a shred neck on an acoustic?
#26
gogiregion

Now that we've come this far, perhaps you might take as moment to explain how the question, "Why are there accousics with shred necks?", could possibly be answered "yes or no", as you've put it in your poll?
#27
Quote by Captaincranky
gogiregion

Now that we've come this far, perhaps you might take as moment to explain how the question, "Why are there accousics with shred necks?", could possibly be answered "yes or no", as you've put it in your poll?


You didn't read the text above the poll did you…
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#28
Quote by gogiregion
You didn't read the text above the poll did you…
No, but I directly quoted your title! So, shouldn't the title state the purpose of the poll?

More importantly, this thread is mostly about your specific problems with one specific guitar, namely your not being able to do barre chords with it.

Sell the frakkin' guitar, and buy one with which can do barre chords. Problem solved.

Note also, I didn't see that somewhat obvious solution posted in the poll choices.
#29
Why can't an acoustic have a thin flat neck? My Breedlove is thin and flat and I'd have a hard time saying that made it less suited to any certain style or more suited to another. As long as you are comfortable with a neck it shouldn't matter.
#30
Quote by Silent_Crow13
Why can't an acoustic have a thin flat neck? My Breedlove is thin and flat and I'd have a hard time saying that made it less suited to any certain style or more suited to another. As long as you are comfortable with a neck it shouldn't matter.
As I pointed out, this would have made a better question about one particular guitar, in the hands of one particular player, instead of the roundabout and bizarre way we got to the actual point of the thread.

I can think of a dozen more suitable responses than, "yes" or "no", to the topic.

Point of fact, more than 40 years ago,. Ovation advertised, "necks more like those of electric guitars", practically since the day they began building them.

From my point of view, and experience, you buy a guitar, and learn to handle the damned thing as is, by practicing playing it.

But don't mind me, I'm decades older than the internet. So I guess I'm just bitter of being deprived of the opportunity of asking pointless and stupid questions online! Or, "bah humbug", as us Scrooges like to say.

EDIT: And as to the answer to the "Ovations have thin necks like electrics" advertising paradigm, I think the answer is patently obvious, "so electric players will want to buy them".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 4, 2017,
#31
Captaincranky

I was asking that not so much as question but as a statement. I gave my Breedlove as an example since he was as he described a shred neck. I had never even heard someone refer to a neck as a shred neck.
I agree with you, I can play anything on my acoustics that I can my electric, since I've got used to the neck in each.
OP just needs some more callouses
Last edited by Silent_Crow13 at Mar 4, 2017,
#32
Quote by Silent_Crow13
Captaincranky

I was asking that not so much as question but as a statement. I gave my Breedlove as an example since he was as he described a shred neck. I had never even heard someone refer to a neck as a shred neck.
I agree with you, I can play anything on my acoustics that I can my electric, since I've got used to the neck in each.
OP just needs some more callouses
No, I realize your "question" was rhetorical in nature. My apologies for not making that clear in my response.

Even our mod dismissed this topic with a somewhat terse, "why not".

If you'll indulge me while I meander down memory lane, my first acoustic had the appearance and fitments of a classical, string through bridge, slotted head stock, and most importantly to this topic, a flat fretboard. But yet was sold unashamedly by Woolworth's as a steel string, for the staggering sum, (at that time at least), of $14.95.

However, every guitar I've come into contact with since, has had a neck radius of about 12" or 14" inches. I believe that Strats and Teles are the only guitars commonly available, (at least in some sort of legacy edition), with 8" or 9" radius necks.

One point, of which you may already be aware, is in 12 strings, along with 7 and 8 strings electric, the necks can flatten out to, at most, 20" radius. Somehow, I think that shallower radius are supposed to in making bending moire easily done. Since I'm all bluster and cowboy chords, along with never having owned an early Strat, I can't attest to that being fact.

Even the Fender "Sonoran" acoustic, which ostensibly has a "Stratocaster neck", involves a fretboard radius of around 12" inches, along with a narrow "C" profile. Given the demeanor of this topic, one could, (albeit nonsensically), claim it has a "shred neck".

There are however, (arguably), guitars with necks designed for "shredding", such as the Ibanez "RG" (?) series, with necks way too slender for acoustic use, and conseq1uently not found on any acoustic of which I'm aware.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 5, 2017,
#33
Hard to tell all of you non-avatar-having-rebels apart from each other

Captaincranky is easy to locate, as long as I keep an eye out for meandering monologues
My God, it's full of stars!
#34
Quote by Dreadnought
Hard to tell all of you non-avatar-having-rebels apart from each other

Captaincranky is easy to locate, as long as I keep an eye out for meandering monologues
Thanks pal... Your post caused me to navigate away to another page, (can't say quite how or why though), causing me to lose another meandering, (but hopefully informative), monologue I had all primed and ready to go!
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 6, 2017,
#35
Captaincranky

Very interesting story, thank you very much. I agree with you. I cannot say about flat being better for bending either. I will say that I have played some guitars with a very noticeable radius in the upper part of the fretboard that made them feel wonky to bend.
#36
My favorite guitar is an acoustic and has a very fine shred neck. I'm sure Cranky and Tony are sick of hearing me brag about it, lol.

Why shouldn't an acoustic have a great neck? Seems goofy not to strive for it. I hate wide necks, thick necks. I have medium length fingers and am none too nimble with them.
#39
Quote by Captaincranky
TobusRex Have you given any thought to that 12 string simulator pedal? It would go perfectly with your Cargo.

Hmmm....it seemed pretty cool. But I need to get better before I spoil myself again. Still have to learn banjo!
#40
Quote by TobusRex
Hmmm....it seemed pretty cool. But I need to get better before I spoil myself again. Still have to learn banjo!

I'm tempted to ask, "how's that coming", but then I think the better of it...

In any case, I still think your Cargo would be an ideal candidate for that type of synth. I'm picturing it as an acoustic, but with  electric or exotic, "I can't quite place that guitar", overtones. That 12 string synth would make the sound "YUGE"!

Tony seem concerned because the 12 string pedal didn't have a true 12 string detuned "jangle". I didn't have the heart to break it to him, that you just need another pedal to give you that effect.. .

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