#1
Can someone pinpoint the problem and help me solve it?

It seems that my guitar strings are too far away from the neck, if that makes sense. They seem farr and hard. And I feel that I have to press down on them too much..and this results in two things: Accuracy has completely gone out the window..Often, I'll accidentally mute a string, or feel it kind of slip of and not fret properly.

And the other thing is, I have to press down on them so hard that I can hear like a slight slapping sound before the note, and when I pull the finger off, it makes another little note. Yeah, works perfectly for hammer ons on fret zero..shit for everything else

This slapping Fieldy like thing seems to get worse the further up the neck I go.


This all relatively new. The guitar is old, and it's the guitar I learnt how to play on, and I never had this probem before.

Now, I've had to put on those ridiculous vintage machine heads with the grooves, as some old ones broke, and that's all the shop had. Could that be it? Could the strings be too big? Or too tight because of these machine heads? (I always strung them on wrong, I learnt how to do it recently, and they end up strung really tight)

Or could it be an issue to do with wnere the strings are attached to the body? (I have to thread them through from the inside, as there are no pins)

This trusty old Fender belonged to my Dad when he was younger, so it's pretty old.
Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise
#2
It could probably do with a set up to reduce the action But there could also be some structural problems if it is an old guitar. Over time the tension of the strings can cause the neck angle to alter and the area of the guitar top behind the bridge to rise.

You should probably have it checked out by a guitar technician.
#3
Yes, have it looked at by a tech. As Garthman says, the geometry of acoustic guitars deteriorates with age due to string tension, and fixing it might cost much more than the guitar is worth. OTOH, with luck, it might just need some standard adjustments that shouldn't be too expensive.
#4
Quote by Krieger91


Now, I've had to put on those ridiculous vintage machine heads with the grooves, as some old ones broke, and that's all the shop had. Could that be it? Could the strings be too big? Or too tight because of these machine heads? (I always strung them on wrong, I learnt how to do it recently, and they end up strung really tight)

Or could it be an issue to do with wnere the strings are attached to the body? (I have to thread them through from the inside, as there are no pins)...[ ]...
I'd love to help, but I'm having the damnest time deciphering your post.

"Strings really tight"
Is the guitar tuned too high? Do you have a tuner? Perhaps the guitar was tuned too low before..
Is there any chance this could be a classical, (nylon string) guitar?

The only thing I did get out of this is you'ere stringing the guitar "backwards". This would place the "fat" or low strings, over the "skinny" grooves in the top nut. As a consequence, this would make the strings sit on top of the nut, instead of laying down in the grooves where they're supposed to be.

It's clear you're completely lost trying to explain what's going on with the guitar.

Here's a fair diagram of a typical steel string acoustic:



And here's a really good guide for setting a steel string acoustic:

http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

Between the two of them, you should at least be able to assess and discuss the situation a bit better.

However, I'm going to throw in with Tony and Garthman in saying you should you should take the guitar to a tech for evaluation.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 3, 2017,
#5
You needed pins.  That could be the problem.  Too late now.  The line of tension force thru the bridge will change from the original design and could pull the bridge up causing the strings to be too high.  The top bracing will need to be removed, the top leveled and the bracing put back in.
Other than that the neck is bent.  Fixing that will cost a small fortune.
Give her to me, I'll pay the shipping!
#6
Quote by skido13    Other than that the neck is bent.  Fixing that will cost a small fortune.
Give her to me, I'll pay the shipping!

  What a guy....
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
  What a guy....

It's called dry humor.  Probably based on the fact that I indeed have been given numerous bent, busted guitars that were unplayable, some fixable, some good only for parts.  Anyhow I see the inappropriateness of my comment in this context, sorry.