#1
I started learning guitar around mid October, so I'm still pretty unskilled. The farthest I've gotten has been getting angus's part of back in black down, but oddly I have more trouble switching chords than playing individual notes and bends and stuff. When I learn a new song, my ability to do all of the chords lags behind me learning the solo. Are there any exercises or somehting I can do to get better at switching chords and know more chords to improvise in the future? Spider exercises don't help with chords it seems to me.
Thanks
#3
well..your new to guitar..chords are going to take time..no easy way around it

get the basic "cowboy" chords

C D E G A there are quite a few songs that contain these chords..get a chord book to help you..these chords are just major chords..learn them in minor form also..

you may find doing bar chords difficult at first,,,depending on your guitar..acoustic/electric? it it is in fair condition you may see if you can "set it up" to make it easier to play

this is going to take time..so be patient..go slow..changing slowly at first may seem very frustrating..stick with it..practice is key to this kind of stuff..so set some time just to do chords..not worry about songs just yet..keep at it .. you WILL get it...

hope this helps ..

then
play well

wolf
#4
You've barely taken your first steps as a guitarist. Give it time. Naturally, chords can be a little difficult because you (usually) have to coordinate more than one finger at a time. Just go slow and practice. When switching from one chord to the next, look for any fingers that you don't have to move. Then you have a bit of a reference point for next chord and you don't have to move as much. For example, look at something like C major to A minor:


e|-0----0-
B|-1----1-
G|-0----2-
D|-2----2-
A|-3----0-
E|--------

You can leave your fingers on the B string and D string in the same place.

For learning more chords for improvising in the future, learn some music theory - specifically how chords are built - and learn the notes of the fretboard.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#5
Chords to learn? Power chords for rock. Also Major 7th's, minor 7th's That does not include all the basic open stuff. Major and Minor chords help. Barre Chords in all shapes.

Most importantly get the basic open chords under control then go over to the more advanced stuff. Oh and get yourself a decent chord dictionary. And basic chord theory help too.

Or if your really stuck check out Steve Stine on Youtube or Carl Brown. Both are awesome guitar teachers.
#6
Here is a chord dictionary for 102 C chords... you need to know the notes of the guitar, how to transpose on the guitar, and some fingering approaches, and the list does not include inversions, slash chords, or poly-chords... but it is a good resource for learning chord type structure. It also kind of suggests why it is important to eventually learn how to construct chords rather than memorize them or look them up...

C Major (C E G)
C Minor (C Eb G)
C Augmented (C E G#)
C Diminished (C Eb Gb)
C Dominant 7th (C E G Bb)
C Major 7th (C E G B)
C Minor 7th (C Eb G Bb)
C Minor Maj 7th (C Eb G B)
C Aug 7 (C E G# Bb)
C Aug Maj 7 (C E G# B)
C Half Dim 7 (C Eb G Bb)
C Full Dim 7 (C Eb Gb Bbb)
C Dim Maj 7 (C Eb Gb B)
C 9 (C E G Bb D)
C b9 (C E G Bb Db)
C #9 (C E G Bb D#)
C Maj 9 (C E G B D)
C Maj b9 (C E G B Db)
C Maj #9 (C E G B D#)
C Min 9 (C Eb G Bb D)
C Min b9 (C Eb G Bb Db)*
C Min Maj 9 (C Eb G B D)
C Min Maj b9 (C Eb G B Db)
C Min Maj #9 (C Eb G B D#)
C Aug 9 (C E G# Bb D)
C Aug b9 (C E G# Bb Db)
C Aug #9 (C E G# Bb D#)
C Aug Maj 9 (C E G# B D)
C Aug Maj b9 (C E G# B Db)
C Aug Maj #9 (C E G# B D#)
C Half Dim 9 (C Eb Gb Bb D)
C Half Dim b9 (C Eb Gb Bb Db)
C Dim 9 (C Eb Gb Bbb D)
C Dim b9 (C Eb Gb Bbb Db)
C Dim Maj 9 (C Eb Gb B D)
C Dim Maj b9 (C Eb Gb B Db)
C 11 (C E G Bb D F)
C b9 11 (C E G Bb Db F)
C #9 11 (C E G Bb D# F)
C #11 (C E G Bb D F#)
C b9 #11 (C E G Bb Db F#)
C #9 #11 (C E G Bb D# F#)
C Maj 11 (C E G B D F)
C Maj b9 11 (C E G B Db F)
C Maj #9 11 (C E G B D# F)
C Maj #11 (C E G B D F#)
C Maj b9 #11 (C E G B Db F#)
C Maj #9 #11 (C E G B D# F#)
C Min 11 (C Eb G Bb D F)
C Min b9 11 (C Eb G Bb Db F)
C Min #9 11 (C Eb G Bb D# F)
C Min #11 (C Eb G Bb D F#)
C Min b9 #11 (C Eb G Bb Db F#)
C Min #9 #11 (C Eb G Bb D# F#)
C Min Maj 11 (C Eb G B D F)
C Min Maj b9 11 (C Eb G B Db F)
C Min Maj #9 11 (C Eb G B D# F)
C Min Maj #11 (C Eb G B D F#)
C Min Maj b9 #11 (C Eb G B Db F#)
C Min Maj #9 #11 (C Eb G B D# F#)
C Aug 11 (C E G# Bb D F)
C Aug b9 11 (C E G# Bb Db F)
C Aug #9 11 (C E G# Bb D# F)
C Aug #11 (C E G# Bb D F#)
C Aug b9 #11 (C E G# Bb Db F#)
C Aug #9 #11 (C E G# Bb D# F#)
C Aug Maj 11 (C E G# B D F)
C Aug Maj b9 11 (C E G# B Db F)
C Aug Maj #9 11 (C E G# B D# F)
C Aug Maj #11 (C E G# B D F#)
C Aug Maj b9 #11 (C E G# B Db F#)
C Aug Maj #9 #11 (C E G# B D# F#)
C Half Dim 11 (C Eb Gb Bb D F)
C Half Dim b9 11 (C Eb Gb Bb Db F)
C Dim 11 (C Eb Gb Bbb D F)
C Dim b9 11 (C Eb Gb Bbb Db F)
C Dim Maj 11 (C Eb Gb B D F)
C Dim Maj b9 11 (C Eb Gb B D F#)
C 13 (C E G Bb D F A)
C b9 11 13 (C E G Bb Db F A)
C #9 11 13 (C E G Bb D# F A)
C #11 13 (C E G Bb D F# A)
C b9 #11 13 (C E G Bb Db F# A)
C #9 #11 13 (C E G Bb D# F# A)
C Maj13 (C E G B D F A)
C Maj b9 11 13 (C E G B Db F A)
C Maj #9 11 13 (C E G B D# F A)
C Maj #11 13 (C E G B D F# A)
C Maj b9 #11 13 (C E G B Db F# A)
C Maj #9 #11 13 (C E G B D# F# A)
C Min11 13 (C Eb G Bb D F A)
C Min b9 11 13 (C Eb G Bb Db F A)
C Min #9 11 13 (C Eb G Bb D# F A)
C Min #11 13 (C Eb G Bb D F# A)
C Min b9 #11 13 (C Eb G Bb Db F# A)
C Min #9 #11 13 (C Eb G Bb D# F# A)
C Min Maj 13 (C Eb G B D F A)
C Min Maj b9 11 (C Eb G B Db F A)
C Min Maj #9 11 13 (C Eb G B D# F A)
C Min Maj #11 13 (C Eb G B D F# A)
C Min Maj b9 #11 13 (C Eb G B Db F# A)
C Min Maj #9 #11 13 (C Eb G B D# F# A)
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#7
PlusPaul 

There's no way someone who has only just started to play the guitar is going to need all of that lol.
I'd say a good way to start out is to learn how to construct triads on the guitar and how to derive 'full chords' from that.

(Although I definitely agree that it's way more benificial to learn how to construct chords by combining notes rather than memorising hundreds of different shapes).
I do not want to have a signature anymore.
#8
Depends on how musically literate you wish to be. How many words would you suggest someone learn in order to to speak your language fluently? A lot of words. Sid viscous got by with a very limited vocabulary. Joe Pass knew every chord in every position.

CAGED in the first month. Flats and sharps in your third month. Minor, min7, min9ths in your sixth month. Maj7, Maj9 in your 12th month. Power chords, diminished chords, 11&13 chords if you want to play jazz.

Learn them all and become a guitarist in demand by other players.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
Overkill much?
That is kind of the point; for all 12 roots it's already past 1200 chords without even getting started on being fancy.
The sooner a guitarist realizes that learning to construct chords is the path forward, the better; and never to soon.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#10
Wow. Thanks for all the advice. I guess there are different ways of going about this, but I guess the general idea is to learn the shapes and stuff, and also how chords are made.

I don't think I'm very good at guitar theory. I tried learning box shapes and stuff, but it was easier for me to learn the intervals and stuff in a key and just play that. Maybe I'll get better later on, but I think that, like you people said, I should start easy.
#11
YOU ONLY NEED POWER CHORDS
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#12
Quote by hecks
YOU ONLY NEED POWER CHORDS
Tell that to Eric Johnson. If you want to get into the semantics, then technically, you don't "need" anything. If you're creative, you can make music with anything.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#13
Quote by Junior#1
Tell that to Eric Johnson. If you want to get into the semantics, then technically, you don't "need" anything. If you're creative, you can make music with anything.


I can make music slapping the strings of my electric guitar with a pancake and call it guitar playing, by your definition
But I guess guitar is nice compared to other instruments since there aren't specific ways you play it. I wonder if a hundred years from now, music experts will be breaking the blues and jazz and rock of the mid 20th century in terms of guitar theory and esoteric terms and stuff. I know that's already happening to some of the earlier genres...
#14
Quote by Junior#1
Tell that to Eric Johnson. If you want to get into the semantics, then technically, you don't "need" anything. If you're creative, you can make music with anything.


well Eric Johnson is a god; every chord he plays is a 'power' chord- more like tell that to guitarists like Malcolm Young who have built their careers on power chords haha
compilation of all ac/dc song endingshttps://soundcloud.com/100-7-kslx/acdcend#


but a more serious answer to this post: I think it's good as a beginner to learn open chords because they are versatile and introduce you to shapes that can be applied anywhere on the neck- but furthermore, I think it's important to know how to form these chords and finding a system to remember all of them.
for example, if you play a barred A major on the fifth fret; and take off your middle finger, it becomes Aminor
little things like that add up and becomes second nature.
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
Last edited by hecks at Mar 4, 2017,
#15
All of them...?

As a beginner you'll rely on basic chord diagrams, but once you have some familiarity with where your notes are, you should get acquainted with the basic theory behind scale and chord construction. Once you know how to build chords, you'll never have to learn another one again.
#16
As many as you possibly can. There should be no point in your life where you say, "Okay, I know enough chords."

My suggestion is to go about it in this order:

1. Learn all the notes on your fifth and sixth strings so you can make any power chord you want, since power chords are easy for instant gratification.

2. Then learn the basic open chords: A, C, D, E, G, along with some of their variations (sevenths, minor, two chords and suspended.) This is going to take a bit of time. Search for open chord exercises online - there are tons of them - and do the ones you like every day. Learn to read just a tiny bit of sheet music for these exercises - enough that you know how many beats to strum for and when to switch chords, it really helps. You won't get it in a few days, but keep at it. Learn some easy open chord songs to impress people at this point - Wish You Were Here, Ballad of Dwight Fry, Knockin' On Heaven's Door.

3. Move on to barre chords. This will be a bit harder than open chords since you'll have to use all four fingers in some types and barre whole frets with just one finger. Lots of people have frustration at this point and some give up thinking that barre chords aren't for them, but don't give up - they're far too useful to give up. If you know barre chords, you can play most chords the average Joe would think up even if you don't know their real shape. You'll already know the notes from power chords, anyway, so the principles oughtn't be too hard for you.

4. Then move on to studying chord construction. I'm not in favour of trying to learn this as soon as some people might recommend (though they mean well) because it makes it look too daunting.

Regularity is key. Practising for half an hour every day is better than practising for five hours on just one day of a week, since sleeping in-between is linked to learning - your lovely brain consolidates information you learned during the day while you're off dreaming about how you're marrying Emma Watson but then Voldemort shows up with a pistol. I promise, once you 'get' it you'll have so much fun you'll want to stay in chord land for a while - I did, and I had to kick myself in the pants to move on to scales

Best of luck! I was in your place not all that long ago. My advice: never allow yourself to think, "Nah, this thing isn't for me, I'll just stick to..." It's only a challenge because it's actually worth doing. But once you get it down, it'll be as easy as talking.

Quote by frenebo
I can make music slapping the strings of my electric guitar with a pancake and call it guitar playing, by your definition..


I think we found the answer to Jimmy Page's violin bow, boys.
#17
Quote by Junior#1
Tell that to Eric Johnson. If you want to get into the semantics, then technically, you don't "need" anything. If you're creative, you can make music with anything.
Save for the fact the real trick is to get people to be willing to pay to listen to it. (Sorry, I just couldn't hold that in).
#18
Start with easy open chords, changing between 2 chords for starters - slowly. Then build up your chord change speed and add more chords as you get proficient in the chords you've learned.. You've only been playing for about 4 months, so your chord hand still has to build/learn 'muscle memory'. Practice those open chords until you can change chords without needing to look at your hands. Then move on to more complicated chords.
#19
Quote by frenebo
...[ [....I don't think I'm very good at guitar theory. I tried learning box shapes and stuff, but it was easier for me to learn the intervals and stuff in a key and just play that. Maybe I'll get better later on, but I think that, like you people said, I should start easy.
Basic musical theory is fairly simple, so long as you incorporate it into your learning process, a little bit at a time. In fact, a fair amount of musical theory is even necessary while "cheating" with a capo. ("Cheating" equals using a capo to change "key"). You still have to know what key you're in, what key you need to be in, and how to get there. Just as an example. Suppose I'm playing in the key of G. What key am I in if I capo the guitar at the 1st fret". At the 3rd, or at 5th, and so on.

A couple of things to remember. Assuming we're playing with "open chords", the guitar's tuning favors keys which have sharps. The keys which correspond to the string names all have sharps, not flats. Why does that matter, you might ask? Because you can only form sharp keys with open chords.

This is where a little bit of theory helps grease the wheels of progress. Much of traditional western music, relies on specific "progressions" of chords within a "key". For example, a major scale encompasses 3 primary chords, on the 1st, 4th, & 5th notes or "degrees" of the scale .So, in C major, those 3 chords will be C (1st), F (4th), and G (5th).. My point is, simply practicing chords, without recognizing their relationship with one another, is fairly pointless. In fact any of the chord drills in books are based on chord progressions you will encounter in songs.A great many country and folk songs have those. "1, 4, 5 chords", as the only changes in the song.

So, while you're learning chords, try to work your changes into a key structure by practicing those "1, 4, 5 changes", as a block. (C 2, 3, 4, F, 2,3,4, G, 2, 3, 4, back to C, 2, 3, 4. In G, G,2,3,4, C,2,3,4 D,2,3,4, back to G, 2,3,4. Later, you can work in the minor chords of any key into the progression as well. So, just a little bit of theory worked into your practice can go a long way toward an actual understanding of music!
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 5, 2017,
#20
Play the chords you like and just hang out with those chords and get to know them.

I like the b Sharp chord.. also the N chord and the L is a favorite.
#21
Quote by Pizzafan
Play the chords you like and just hang out with those chords and get to know them.

I like the b Sharp chord.. also the N chord and the L is a favorite.


My favourite is the 'Fish'-chord. It's this one:

e - 0
b - 6
g - 4
D - 0
A - 6
E - 5

It's a divine chord shape you can move all around the fretboard to create wonderful sounds
I do not want to have a signature anymore.
#22
Quote by RDSElite
My favourite is the 'Fish'-chord. It's this one:

e - 0
b - 6
g - 4
D - 0
A - 6
E - 5

It's a divine chord shape you can move all around the fretboard to create wonderful sounds


Fret the E String with middle finger remove fretboard and run around lettling others know about your ability to finger such a chord
#23
I kind of have my own system for chords.

I start with the 1-5-1-3 major triad. In C, that's C-G-C-E. Then you can invert that to 3-1-3-5 and then again to 5-3-5-1.

From there, just adjust to make it a minor triad or a diminished triad.

Then, instead of 1-5-1-3, make it 1-5-7-3. Invert it naturally. 3-7-1-5, 5-1-3-7 and 7-3-5-1. Then make it a dominant 7, minor 7, and then half diminished 7.

From there, lower the 3 to a 2 or raise the 5 to a 6 to make suspended chords. The 4 can be added by either lowering the 5 or raising the 3.

Pay attention to the suspended 4 chords that are similar in shape, less to memorize. You also can substitute 7th chords for chords like suspended 2nds by raising the 1, and you can substitute suspended 6ths by lowering the 7.

In example... Csus2 by lowering the 3 to a 2 is C D G B. Raising the 1 to the 2 makes D E G B aka an Em7/D third inversion chord.

Bm7b5sus4 by raising the 3 to a 4 is B E F A. That's also an Fmaj7#11 chord when you lower the 5 to the 4 aka F A B E.

It works for me. The inversions work well and it gives me easy access to lots of fancy chords I need for stuff. I can sight read thru the fake book pretty easily. From there, you can even match the melody with chord voicings with inversions.
#24
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
I kind of have my own system for chords.

I start with the 1-5-1-3 major triad. In C, that's C-G-C-E. Then you can invert that to 3-1-3-5 and then again to 5-3-5-1.

From there, just adjust to make it a minor triad or a diminished triad.

Then, instead of 1-5-1-3, make it 1-5-7-3. Invert it naturally. 3-7-1-5, 5-1-3-7 and 7-3-5-1. Then make it a dominant 7, minor 7, and then half diminished 7.

From there, lower the 3 to a 2 or raise the 5 to a 6 to make suspended chords. The 4 can be added by either lowering the 5 or raising the 3.

Pay attention to the suspended 4 chords that are similar in shape, less to memorize. You also can substitute 7th chords for chords like suspended 2nds by raising the 1, and you can substitute suspended 6ths by lowering the 7.

In example... Csus2 by lowering the 3 to a 2 is C D G B. Raising the 1 to the 2 makes D E G B aka an Em7/D third inversion chord.

Bm7b5sus4 by raising the 3 to a 4 is B E F A. That's also an Fmaj7#11 chord when you lower the 5 to the 4 aka F A B E.

It works for me. The inversions work well and it gives me easy access to lots of fancy chords I need for stuff. I can sight read thru the fake book pretty easily. From there, you can even match the melody with chord voicings with inversions.

Do you honestly think that's going to be anything other than complete gibberish to someone who is just getting to grips with chords?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#25
jrcsgtpeppers, learning voicing is definitely useful! However, I'd put your post at "intermediate". OP just started learning, and this information will probably go over anyone's head that early on

A few corrections for when OP gets up to that level:
1-2-5-7, like C-D-G-B, is a Cmaj7sus2, which usually implies Cmaj9
B-E-F-A sounds more like Bm7b5(add11); a sus chord by construction is neither major nor minor

---
On the other hand, I'm not sure when this thread turned into an exchange of jokes, and the thread needs proofreading in general
---
OP, I'd start with the first few posts and see where to go from there. Speed comes with time spent practicing. Just make sure you're not introducing too much unneeded stress to your body!
#26
Quote by frenebo
When I learn a new song, my ability to do all of the chords lags behind me learning the solo. Are there any exercises or somehting I can do to get better at switching chords and know more chords to improvise in the future?


Really, just keep learning songs. The chords you want to learn are in the songs. The switching between chords is in the songs, It's all in the songs, the exercises are the songs, the more chords to know are in the songs, etc.

That said, you must listen carefully to the songs in order to play the chords as they are played in the song, not as they might appear on a diagram or in stock form. That means developing the habit of noticing the chords position, inversion, and voicing as used in that song. Don't just use the stock cowboy chords and barre chords to play every song.

Ask yourself...
Where on the neck is the chord is played?
Is a chord that you know as C E G being played as E G C or G C E ?
Do the chords make a melody line with, for example, their top notes?
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
Last edited by PlusPaul at Mar 5, 2017,
#30
The Cowboy chords are what you need to learn. A,C,D,E,F and 7ths. That's more chords than Leadbelly needed I'd recommend B7 also, comes in handy.

Barre chords...meh. I still can't do them (unless I'm drunk, strangely, and then only poorly). I can do a cheapass fake though by sliding the F chord up and down the fretboard.
#31
Holy sh**!
Scales just made sense to me.
I was playing some of the chords you people gave me and I was also messing with scales, and it started all coming together. Thanks.
#33
Quote by frenebo
Holy sh**!
Scales just made sense to me.
I was playing some of the chords you people gave me and I was also messing with scales, and it started all coming together. Thanks.

At a very basic level you can look at scales and chords as the same thing, just arranged differently. If you play a sequence of notes one after the other it's a scale, take some of those exact same notes but play them simultaneously instead of one after the other and it's a chord.

Admittedly hat's an incredibly simplified take on things and doesn't really explain much, but it does help a bit when it comes to figuring out how it all fits together.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#34
frenebo Hey there, if you're fairly new to guitar I would start with practicing the open chords:

E major:

e|-0--
B|-0--
G|-1--
D|-2--
A|-2--
E|-0--

E minor:

e|-0--
B|-0--
G|-0--
D|-2--
A|-2--
E|-0--

A major:

e|-0--
B|-2--
G|-2--
D|-2--
A|-0--
E|----

A minor:

e|-0--
B|-1--
G|-2--
D|-2--
A|-0--
E|----

The difference between major and minor is one major sounds happy and minor sounds sad. These two (or 4) chord shapes are the building blocks for bar chords, which are chords that intermediate guitar players use. Bar chords can be moved up and down the frets of the guitar to play all chords from the musical alphabet. Bar chords are a little tricky to get the hang of as you need to rearrange your fingers so your index finger is free to "bar the fret". I would recommend mastering the chords above first, and then checking out a Youtube video on bar chords. Alternatively, get in touch with me at jamie-jamieson.com and we can have chat about Skype guitar lessons.

Cheers,
Jamie
Last edited by jamiejamieson at Mar 6, 2017,
#35
I would start with E, Em, A, Am, C, G, D, Dm, and Bm7 because they are the most common open chords. They are easy to play and the shapes your fingers make can be applied to bar chords later on.
Not taking any online orders.
#36
Quote by jamiejamieson
The difference between major and minor is one major sounds happy and minor sounds sad. 

Until you put them in a context (chord progression). Then the sound of the isolated chord is no longer relevant, and the entire progression determines whether it sounds sad or happy or whatever else. It's most often a mixture of major and minor chords with a few dominants/diminished chords here and there. A progression rarely has chords of only one type (unless it's some I-IV-V variant).

I know this is obvious to any non-beginner, but I just want to clarify.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Mar 6, 2017,
#37
Why become someone who can just play a few songs, when you can become a guitar PLAYER who can listen to a song/look at sheet music and play just about any song?

I started almost exactly when you did but I am FAR further along than you right now, not because I'm the second coming of John Mayer, or because I'm any smarter - its because I followed the justin guitar online course (which is free!).

It is a structured course to teach people how to play guitar, and I can do all of the E and A-shaped bar chords at this point with ease, because the training exercises are excellent. I am able to play many songs whose sheet music or tab that I come across as long as I can work out the proper strumming pattern - another thing you learn from the course.  I am currently working through Intermediate Foundation Stage #3, and hope to finish the Intermediate course by the summer so I can start the rhythm blues module by then.

Go to the site:

www.justinguitar.com

and purchase two items: the Beginner Songbook #1 and the Practical Music Theory book.  

Then follow the Beginner course first and then the Intermediate, which are both laid out step-by-step to teach you how to be a complete guitar player including scales, chords, ear training, rhythmic patterns, etc. Then there are modules for Rock, blues (rhythm and lead), folk, etc.
Last edited by transwarp at Mar 10, 2017,
#38
Quote by frenebo
The farthest I've gotten has been getting angus's part of back in black down, but oddly I have more trouble switching chords than playing individual notes and bends and stuff.

Really?  The first riff is not that easy to get right in terms of timing, bends, clarity and consistent sound. After the last note it goes straight into an E chord. I don't think this is an easy song for a novice.  There are many far easier songs on AC/DCs earlier albums.
#39
I basically only use Am, F, C, G, Dm, and even E every once in a blue moon. Lots of songs only use the first four though, which is pretty convenient. In any case, Am is a necessity, no matter what style or genre you are playing, at least in my experience. F is a little tricky at some times though, but there is some tips and tricks for that. It's good to learn the suspended version of these chords as well (Such as Csus) because while playing you can add those in to spice up the progression.
#Acoustic Life
#40
I would suggest learning to play chords before you learn anything else because chords are what guitarists will be playing most of the time. So start with the basic open chords - E A D G C Em Am Dm. When you can fluently change between these chords, start learning barre chords (they are the same shapes). Learning power chords may help you with learning barre chords.

Even with just open chords you can play plenty of songs. In the beginning you don't need to learn the exact guitar part of the songs. Just accompany the songs with these chords (and the original song doesn't even need to have a guitar in it). There are plenty of chord tabs here in UG, and most of the time you can transpose them to a key where you only need open chords. Get a capo and the key of the song is not a problem.

I don't think memorizing how chords are built makes much sense before you can actually play some chords and change between them fluently. Theory only makes sense once you can play some music. But sure, I would suggest learning about chord construction and chord functions.

Plenty of "singer songwriters" don't really play anything more complex than open chords and barre chords. If you are asked to accompany a song, you can get pretty far with just open and barre chords. Good accompaniment is more about good rhythm than fancy chord voicings, and you can sound pretty "convincing" even if your chord knowledge is limited to basic open and barre chords (as long as your sense of rhythm and timing is good).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115