#1
Here are a few of my problems


1- Could anyone explain to me,how can I create chord progression
which has to rely on emphasize character of chosen scale?

How it looks chords progression (in the key of C major)with ionian mood
and how it looks chords progression with phrygian mood(in the key of C major)??

Each scale has its own characteristic chord progression?

I dont undertand how create ionian progression,dorian progression ,phrygian progression etc

Sclae have own mood because of characteristic note
but how about progression.

C,F G (I,IV,V)- is ionian progresion/progression in ionian mood?
d,G,a (ii,V,iv) - is dorian progression with dorian mood?
Chord a (iv) is dominant in dorian progression?

You know what I mean? 

How about this progression,in the key of c:
C,F,G7 - this progression have own character/mood?
Which one?C,F,G7 is Ionian,lydian or mixolyd. progression?

I try with ionian scale .
Characteristic notes - fourth and seventh degree (f & b)
So,if I want to create Ionian progression
I should focus on those two sounds in chords?

C 11 - c,e,g,b,d,f ( c is tonic for ionian scale)
F 11 - f,a,c,e,g,b ( b is 7 for ionian scale)
G7 - b,f,b,d,g (first inversion)
C 7+ (c,g,b,e,g)

C11,F11,G7,C7+ = what mood we have in this progression?
And why?

Or this

which mood we have in this progression and why?
2 -What do you know about playing melodic ideas that suggest other ideas?
When someone plays a melodic motif and before you hear the next phrase, you already know what it's going to sound like.

My problem is:

- how to build phrases which are question implying the answer?

- how to build phrases
which are suggestive of asking another question
which suggests the next question etc etc before answer ?

"The logic of improvised musical expression
it is what characterizes all great musicians".

..."motives development".

Phrasing typical for a particular style of music
- another mysterious issues for me 


3 - Everyone wants to play solos,they focus on scales etc but,

how to create accompaniment for different musical genres?
How to compose & arrange different musical styles?
How freely move from one style to another?

Where to start?
Do You recommend any books?


4 - How To Flow Between Modes - by changing the chord in the accompaniment,I'm right?


So if I will play Ionic 'shape' = cdefgab, with G7 chord (g,b,d,f)
I will be playing mixsolydian scale/mood,right?


We do not have to change the shape of lick,we can play ionic shape continuously
Only need to change chord in the accompaniment
to give our ionian shape arbitrary character / mood.

Ionian shape with chord Cmaj = ionian mood
Ionian shape with chord d = dorian mood
Ionian shape with 'e' in accompaniment = phrygian mood
Ionian shape with chord F = lydian mood
Ionian shape with G7 = mixolydian mood
Ionian shape with 'a' in accompaniment = aeolian mood
Ionian shape with b in accompaniment = locrian mood

Right?
#2
1- Could anyone explain to me,how can I create chord progression
which has to rely on emphasize character of chosen scale?

How it looks chords progression (in the key of C major)with ionian mood
and how it looks chords progression with phrygian mood(in the key of C major)??

Each scale has its own characteristic chord progression?

I dont undertand how create ionian progression,dorian progression ,phrygian progression etc

Sclae have own mood because of characteristic note
but how about progression.

So you want to know how to create a chord progression that is in a certain mode, for example how to create a chord progression in D Dorian?

C,F G (I,IV,V)- is ionian progresion/progression in ionian mood?
d,G,a (ii,V,iv) - is dorian progression with dorian mood?
Chord a (iv) is dominant in dorian progression?

I would suggest learning about functional harmony and major and minor keys first. Dm G Am could be in D Dorian, but it will pretty likely sound like A minor. Also, even if it was in D Dorian, it wouldn't be "ii V vi" (and it would definitely not be iv, but I assume you meant vi). In D Dorian, Dm is the tonic chord. So the progression would be i IV v. But as I said, it will most likely sound like A minor (iv-bVII-i).

A minor is really not the dominant of D Dorian. A chord that has a dominant function is a dominant 7th or a diminished chord. One thing about modal harmony is that you avoid the dominant function. A dominant resolving to the tonic is the definition of tonal harmony.

How about this progression,in the key of c:
C,F,G7 - this progression have own character/mood?
Which one?C,F,G7 is Ionian,lydian or mixolyd. progression?


You clearly don't understand enough about keys and chord functions so I would suggest forgetting about modes for a while. C F G7 is a I IV V7 progression in C major.

I try with ionian scale .
Characteristic notes - fourth and seventh degree (f & b)
So,if I want to create Ionian progression
I should focus on those two sounds in chords?

Technically yes, but Ionian isn't really a thing any more - we just call that major. Again, I would suggest learning about functional harmony and forget about modes for a while. Also, I would say that the most characteristic note of the major scale is the major third. When you hear that, you can instantly tell that the song is in a major key.

C 11 - c,e,g,b,d,f ( c is tonic for ionian scale)
F 11 - f,a,c,e,g,b ( b is 7 for ionian scale)
G7 - b,f,b,d,g (first inversion)
C 7+ (c,g,b,e,g)

C11,F11,G7,C7+ = what mood we have in this progression?
And why?

C11 is not C E G B D F. That would be Cmaj11 (which is a chord you won't really see anywhere because the 11th in a maj7 chord sounds really clashy).
F A C E G B would be Fmaj9#11.
I don't know what C7+ even means. Usually "+" in a chord name refers to an augmented chord. But C E G B is just a Cmaj7.

Also, it's not "mood", it's called "mode". "Mood" means kind of the same as "feeling" and that's more of a subjective thing.

Or this
https://zapodaj.net/images/5986a5dc61718.png
which mood we have in this progression and why?


I assume you come from a country that uses different chord symbols than what I'm used to, because some of the chord symbols are just weird.

The first chord sounds pretty bad to me, but other than that, it's typical C major stuff.


But seriously, I would suggest forgetting about modes for now. You don't properly understand major and minor keys, functional harmony and chord construction, and you should learn about those first.

Most of the stuff that you will play/hear on the radio will be in a major or a minor key so focus on those.


2) and 3)

Honestly, just play music. To me it sounds like you are a beginner that just doesn't have enough experience playing music. You will learn about those things just by playing and listening to music. I would also suggest finding a teacher, because your questions would be pretty hard to answer in a single post. Or it wouldn't necessarily be difficult, but the answer would most likely be too vague and you wouldn't learn anything from it.

So play music, use your ears. Play with other people. You'll learn much more from that than from reading a book.

4)

Same as 1. Learn about major and minor keys and functional harmony first. Modes aren't really that important and at this point they will just confuse you.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 4, 2017,
#3
Re: picture -

Some central European countries use "H" to stand for what the French know as Si and a lot of the world knows as "B"; that B-D-F-A (x53435) is known as either Bm7b5, Bø7, or B half-diminished 7th, but with a D root. It probably is acting as a G9 substitute (G-B-D-F-A), because it goes into Cmaj7 (or C△7)

Usually "7+" is not short for "maj7", but for "7+5", more commonly written as "7#5" (C7#5 = C-E-G#-Bb, often functioning as C7b13)

the "d#7" is a half-step between the neighboring m7 chords; I'd call it Ebm7 tbh (downwards direction promotes flat usage)

The last two measures are a common ii-V-I in C major
======
opiekundps2015, there is a sticky that may be very relevant for you. I agree with MM above; I think you need to learn how to name chords and figure out their function, and that might be easiest to do by first analyzing other people's music. Doing that will help you describe what you want to write and give you a better idea if the writing would sound good if you listened to it 5 years from today
#4
Marine gave you very good advice .. modes will just confuse you...and it seems they already have...study diatonic harmony (Tonal) it will give you a strong foundation on how keys (major & minir) are formed and what chords are in them and how they work with each other..in doing so..many of the questions you are asking will be resolved..when you have a solid understanding and use of tonal harmony then modes will begin to make sense..and you may discover that they are rarely used or needed...
play well

wolf
#5
I;m probably going to repeat much of the above, but here goes anyway...
Quote by opiekundps2015

1- Could anyone explain to me,how can I create chord progression
which has to rely on emphasize character of chosen scale?
Assuming you're talking modes, the traditional jazz method is to use two chords. The primary chord contains any note of the mode except the character note. The secondary contrasting chord contains that note.
So, for D dorian, you could use Dm7, Dm9, Dm11, D9sus4, etc. as primary chord (none of which contain B). For the other chord, you could use G, G7, G9, Em7, Cmaj7 (all of which contain B). The most common choices are Dm7 and G7, or Dm7 and Em7 - although jazz tends to form chords in 4ths more than in 3rds. Eg, Dm11 played as D-G-C-F-A (bottom to top).
Quote by opiekundps2015

How it looks chords progression (in the key of C major)with ionian mood
For the C major key you can use any chords, almost at random, because C is likely to sound like the strongest chord whatever order they go in. But it's still makes sense to start and end on C, to confirm it.
Quote by opiekundps2015

and how it looks chords progression with phrygian mood (in the key of C major)??
Phrygian mode is not "in the key of C major" - or in any major key. Phrygian mode is like a minor key with a b2 degree.
But assuming you mean using the same notes as the C major scale, that would be an Em as primary chord, with ideally F as the contrast. That's E phrygian mode, which is not "in the key of" C major. The keynote is E.
Quote by opiekundps2015

Each scale has its own characteristic chord progression?
No, not really. That is, major and minor keys don't, although modes - being necessarily limited to avoid confusion with keys - often are distinguished by very simple chord sequences, usually comprising just two chords, sometimes only one (to really be on the safe side).
Quote by opiekundps2015

I dont undertand how create ionian progression,dorian progression ,phrygian progression etc
Listening to - and learning - some modal music would be the best start.
Quote by opiekundps2015

Sclae have own mood because of characteristic note
No, not really. It;s because of all the notes in combination. The character note is what distinguishes them from the nearest (more familiar) major or minor scale.
Quote by opiekundps2015

but how about progression.

C,F G (I,IV,V)- is ionian progresion/progression in ionian mood?
Yes.
Quote by opiekundps2015

d,G,a (ii,V,iv) - is dorian progression with dorian mood?
Possibly yes. Better without the Am. And the numbers should be i-IV-v, if it really is to be in D dorian mode.
Quote by opiekundps2015

Chord a (iv) is dominant in dorian progression?
No. In D dorian mode, A is the dominant note, and Am is the dominant chord. You're confusing the term "dominant" as applied to a scale degree (V) with the term "dominant 7th", applied to the chord type formed on the V degree of major (or harmonic minor). That would be G7 in key of C major.
D dorian mode is not in C major, and the V degree is A. The G or G7 chord in D dorian mode won't function as a dominant, and acts as the subdominant.
Quote by opiekundps2015

You know what I mean? 
Yes I think so! But maybe you're not sure...
Quote by opiekundps2015

How about this progression,in the key of c:
C,F,G7 - this progression have own character/mood?
Which one?C,F,G7 is Ionian,lydian or mixolyd. progression?
It's a C major key progression. No need for modal terms. You could call it "Ionian" if you insist, but a lot of theorists would object. Keys have nothing (much) to do with modes.
Quote by opiekundps2015

I try with ionian scale .
Characteristic notes - fourth and seventh degree (f & b)
So,if I want to create Ionian progression
I should focus on those two sounds in chords?
You're talking major key here, but in a sense those notes function in the same way as the contrast chord in a mode. The 4th in particular is the tension note - the only one that sounds dissonant on the tonic chord. Together with the 7th, it makes the tritone that gives the V7 chord its dissonant energy, driving it towards the tonic. But this is really major key theory (tonality and function). Not modal theory.
Quote by opiekundps2015

C 11 - c,e,g,b,d,f ( c is tonic for ionian scale)
F 11 - f,a,c,e,g,b ( b is 7 for ionian scale)
G7 - b,f,b,d,g (first inversion)
C 7+ (c,g,b,e,g)
Try these and see how they sound. The correct chord names would be Cmaj11 (awkwardly dissonant, with the F above the E, and almost never used); Fmaj9#11; G7/B; Cmaj7 (not C7+,which is C E G# Bb). The last 3 chords would work well in a C major progression, but not the first. Leave that F out.
Quote by opiekundps2015


Or this
[snip]
which mood we have in this progression and why?
It's a major key progression, starting with a very dissonant chord that (in isolation) I'd call an E phrygian chord.
Bars 3 and 4 form quite a nice ii-vii-I cadence into C major. (The vii chord is like a rootless G9.)
Bar 6 has a chromatic passing chord, but otherwise this whole sequence is in C major. (I'd lose that confusing-sounding first chord, that's all.)
The "mood" will be governed by a few things. Firstly the maj7 chords (Fmaj7, Cmaj7) have a familiar "nostalgic/bittersweet" effect. But mainly the mood will depend on (a) how fast you play this progression, (b) how loud, (c) what instruments you play it on.
Quote by opiekundps2015

2 -What do you know about playing melodic ideas that suggest other ideas?
When someone plays a melodic motif and before you hear the next phrase, you already know what it's going to sound like.
You never know exactly. It's just that certain phrases (like certain chord changes) create a sense of expectation, usually by remaining unresolved. The expectation is simply that a resolution of some kind will follow, at some point. You can't predict how that will be done. (If you do successfully predict it that usually means the music is experienced as boring, cliched or cheesy. Easy listening.)
Quote by opiekundps2015

My problem is:

- how to build phrases which are question implying the answer?

- how to build phrases
which are suggestive of asking another question
which suggests the next question etc etc before answer ?
Essentially, don't end your first phrase on the tonic note (or tonic chord). That way, we know something else has to follow. We will expect something in the same key, at least, but there's no way you can make a listener expect something precise in detail. Unless maybe you play a major scale from 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 and stop on 7, omitting the "8" (octave tonic). The ear really demands that tonic after the leading tone.
Quote by opiekundps2015

"The logic of improvised musical expression
it is what characterizes all great musicians".

..."motives development".

Phrasing typical for a particular style of music
- another mysterious issues for me 


3 - Everyone wants to play solos,they focus on scales etc but,

how to create accompaniment for different musical genres?
How to compose & arrange different musical styles?
How freely move from one style to another?

Where to start?
Do You recommend any books?
No, not books. The answer to all your questions is really: listen to lots more music, and learn how to play it. Copy as much as you can by ear, but learn to play it any way you can.
Listen for the effects you like (and want to make), and find out how they are done. (It might not be anything to do with modes, and little to do with chord progressions.)
Quote by opiekundps2015

4 - How To Flow Between Modes - by changing the chord in the accompaniment,I'm right?


So if I will play Ionic 'shape' = cdefgab, with G7 chord (g,b,d,f)
I will be playing mixsolydian scale/mood,right?


We do not have to change the shape of lick,we can play ionic shape continuously
Only need to change chord in the accompaniment
to give our ionian shape arbitrary character / mood.

Ionian shape with chord Cmaj = ionian mood
Ionian shape with chord d = dorian mood
Ionian shape with 'e' in accompaniment = phrygian mood
Ionian shape with chord F = lydian mood
Ionian shape with G7 = mixolydian mood
Ionian shape with 'a' in accompaniment = aeolian mood
Ionian shape with b in accompaniment = locrian mood

Right?
Sort of. But only if those chords are isolated. Modal terms don't apply in a key-based progression, where each chord has a function relative to the tonic.
And there is no such thing as an "ionian shape" (although this might be a language thing). The notes ABCDEFG - in any order or pattern - will produce those modal sounds when used over each of those chords. But - like I say - if those chords are strung together in a sequence, each of their modal sounds will give way to the overall "C major key" sound.
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 5, 2017,
#6
Thank you for all answers,Now I have to translate and understand

Listening to - and learning - some modal music would be the best start.

Any suggestions?I have idea,Can you give me seven tracks/songs,one* for each mode? :>

* or two or more... seven songs for each of the seven scales


PS.I recently got from George Garzone his DVD "The Triadic Chromatic Approach"
I had no time to delve into it but it seems to me that this is a very interesting and original system
Good for anyone who feels stagnation,If someone reworked this subject let it share opinion
Last edited by opiekundps2015 at Mar 5, 2017,
#7
Learn about keys and functional harmony first. If you don't understand how to determine which key (major or minor) you are in, you will most likely not understand modes.

So before you start listening to modal music, learn about tonal music.

Let's start with keys. If a song is in the key of C major, it means that the tonic (i.e. the note that sounds like home) is C, and the tonic triad is C major. That's really everything you need to be in the key of C major. Most of the time you will also use the notes in the C major scale, but you are not limited to those. As long as C major chord sounds like home, you are in the key of C major.

If we change the tonic triad to C minor, we are in the key of C minor. The difference between major and minor keys is really just one note - the third. Minor keys have a minor third (Eb in the key of C) and major keys have a major third (E in the key of C).

Now let's try finding the tonic of a melody. Play the C major scale, but end it with a B instead of a C. This sounds pretty tense. It sounds like the B wants to go somewhere. Now play C and you can hear how the tension releases. It sounds like we have come back home. So in this case C is our tonic which means we are in the key of C. And because we used the notes in the C major scale, it means that we are in the key of C major. If you had replaced the E with an Eb, we would be in the key of C minor.

If you understand this, great. Now, let's try this in practice.

What key is this piece in?



Find the note that sounds like home by ear. After you have the tonic in your ear, take your guitar and find the note on the fretboard. This is the tonic. Then listen to whether it sounds more like major or minor. Let's pretend the tonic was C and it sounded like minor. This would mean it would be in the key of C minor (I can tell you that it is not in the key of C minor, but I want you to find the key yourself).

You don't really need to know any other note than the tonic and recognize whether it sounds more like minor or major. The other notes aren't important when figuring out the key, so you can do it purely by ear without needing to find sheet music or tabs or anything.

Let's try another one.



Again. Do the same thing - just find the note that sounds like home and find it on your fretboard. Does it sound more like major or minor? That's your key. Let's see how you did...
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Quote by opiekundps2015
Thank you for all answers,Now I have to translate and understand


Any suggestions?I have idea,Can you give me seven tracks/songs,one* for each mode? :
Let's start with dorian. Here's two examples:

- D dorian (moving to Eb dorian in the bridge)


- A dorian.

More later...
#9
One other thing about modal music. There are two ways of treating chord changes.

1. Using other chords harmonized from the same scale. This is essentially how normal major and minor key music works, but also how the stronger modes - essentially mixolydian and dorian - can also work.

2. Changing to another mode of the same type, on a different root. This is typically how weaker modes like lydian or phrygian work - but mixolydian and dorian can also be treated in this way, to differentiate them from how major and minor keys work.

With any modal music - where the makers are really keen to establish the modal difference - using too many chords from the same scale tends to draw the ear to the relative major key. To keep the ear focused on the modal key chord, the easiest method is obviously to use that chord alone, for as long as possible. Most modes will allow a secondary chord, but usually it's important for that second chord to be under-emphasized. It's even more important to do that if a third chord is introduced. (Remember that this is only if you're concerned about producing a modal sound. If you find a chord sequence you like, it doesn't really matter if it's modal or not!)

E.g., in the examples above, Miles Davis' "So What" used both methods 1 and 2. The D dorian section contains an Em11 chord as the secondary (contrast) chord to the main Dm11. And then the bridge section is a change up to Eb dorian.
"Oye Como Va" uses method 1, with Am7 and D7 as the two chords from A dorian mode. Although both are equally weighted (in terns of the time spent on each one), Am7 dominates as the key chord, which makes it A dorian rather than D mixolydian.
Method 1 is by far the most common system in modal rock music, while method 2 is more standard in jazz.

Here's some more examples:

MIXOLYDIAN MODE. This is the most common mode in rock, and is probably more popular than the major key, although it's common to combine both. IOW, the typical rock song will contain chords from the major (ionian) and mixolydian modes on the same key note. This is called "mode mixture", or "borrowing" from "parallel" keys or modes. This is so common that you could pick almost any rock song at random and hear it in action.

Most rock musicians are not interested in pure modal effects, so it's unusual to find tunes in single modes. But the Beatles (Lennon and Harrison at least) were strongly drawn to the scale/mode that they didn't know was called mixolydian, because of its appealing pseudo-Indian drone characteristic. The Lennon songs She Said She Said and Tomorrow Never Knows are pure mixolydian, while Norwegian Wood has a mixolydian vamp and A section (the B section being mode mixture, dorian and ionian). Harrison's Within You Without You is almost pure mixolydian, apart from a brief b3 in the bridge (ie a hint of dorian).
Hard to find Beatles originals on youtube of course, but here's one:

- that's C mixolydian. A C drone throughout, with a Bb chord as an occasional contrast. And really milking it for that "exotic" effect, of course.

Here's a more typical "rock mixolydian" tune:

Chords E D and A, with E as clear key chord. This is a "method 1" example, all the chords drawn from the same scale, but focused on E enough to prevent it sounding like the relative major scale (A major).

Probably 1000s of rock songs have been written in this mode, although most will introduce an E major V chord (B) at some point. (The Rolling Stones "Sympathy for the Devil" is an example.)

PHRYGIAN. Rare, generally. It's a popular sound in metal, but not often explored in its pure form. Here's a good example using method 2 - a riff played in E phrygian first and then shifting to A phrygian and back:


LYDIAN. Another rare mode, but one extensively explored by Joe Satriani. The following tune uses method 2 again. In C lydian overall, but each chord change is to another lydian chord - Ab lydian, G lydian and F lydian.
#11
Quote by atza
Yes, that's good. His language is still a little too tied to the idea of a "parent" major scale, although he clearly understands (and explains) that the modes need to be separated from that "parent". (Historically, these "children" are older than the "parent", of course... )

IOW, I think it would be better if he explained B phrygian mode (as he does in part 2) by beginning from B minor, not from G major. He knows what he is talking about (and writes well), but that G major link is still going to befuddle a few readers, I suspect.

The very best explanation of modes that I've read so far online is this: https://www.reddit.com/r/musictheory/wiki/core/modes
(downside - not quite enough on how they work in rock music.)

And let's not forget we have a great sticky on this very board: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1042392
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 6, 2017,
#12
Let's start with dorian. Here's two examples

How do you know in which scale is the song?

These songs You can also recognize?

The Swing Ninjas - Salad Days
The Speakeasies' Swing Band - Black Swamp Village
Big Bad VooDoo Daddy - Spooky Madness
Ray Charles - Hit The Road Jack
Yeah Yeah Yeahs - Heads Will Roll
Royksopp - What Else Is There
Beetle Juice Theme Song












This song this performance is brilliant,so many tension notes on vocal!!!


Squirrel Nut Zippers "Hell" - Music Video directed by Norwood Cheek and Grady Cooper
Squirrel Nut Zippers - Ghost of Stephen Foster



Mr. Bungle - Ma Meeshka Mow Skwoz
Last edited by opiekundps2015 at Mar 6, 2017,
#13
Okay for real, modes aren't going to help you if you don't understand the nature of scales and root/home notes. Look at MM's last post and try to answer those questions first

If you can't answer about major or minor, it's not useful to ask about modes. This isn't being mean; you were given the link to the same sticky twice and haven't shown that you understand functional harmony yet.

Go back five steps and start learning about functional harmony - we can help you there - before taking on modes
#14
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Okay for real, modes aren't going to help you if you don't understand the nature of scales and root/home notes. Look at MM's last post and try to answer those questions first

If you can't answer about major or minor, it's not useful to ask about modes. This isn't being mean; you were given the link to the same sticky twice and haven't shown that you understand functional harmony yet.

Go back five steps and start learning about functional harmony - we can help you there - before taking on modes

This.

I chose those two songs because there's no ambiguity about their key, and if you can't hear what key those songs are in, you can't really understand what modes are and they will only confuse you even more. So answer my questions first.

Learn the most important things first. Modes are not that important, but having a good understanding of functional harmony and major and minor keys is.

Quote by opiekundps2015
How do you know in which scale is the song?

These songs You can also recognize?

Did you not read my post? Read it and answer the questions. We are not going to give you all the answers because you will not learn anything that way. If you follow the advice in my previous post, you will be able to recognize the key of most songs (of course some songs are tonally more ambiguous, but what I said in my previous post is a good starting point).

Also, none of the songs you posted are modal. Most of them are in a minor key, but they use some chords/notes outside of the key signature. The knowledge of modes will really not help you to figure out what's happening in these songs. The knowledge of major and minor keys and functional harmony will.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#15
A user by the name of xxdarrenxx wrote a good article on modes, chord progressions that bring out the characteristic of a mode, and provided some examples.

I think you might find it useful.  Here is a link: **The Modes** Summary & Examples
Si
#16
Quote by opiekundps2015
How do you know in which  scale is the song?
Let me just say I agree with the others.  You need to be able to distinguish major from minor before tackling modes, because the differences between modes are more subtle.  Until you get how major and minor keys work, you'll never really get modes.
#17
Quote by 20Tigers
A user by the name of xxdarrenxx wrote a good article on modes, chord progressions that bring out the characteristic of a mode, and provided some examples.

I think you might find it useful.  Here is a link: **The Modes** Summary & Examples

His explanation is good, but unfortunately he repeats some common mistakes in his examples - suggesting he's just copied his lists from somewhere without checking.  E.g., Eleanor Rigby is not in dorian mode.  It's mainly aeolian, with a couple of instances of a dorian major 6.  White Rabbit is phrygian dominant, not phrygian (and arguably not even that).  Stairway to Heaven, too, is more than just aeolian - it's a traditional minor key mode mixture (with the variable 6th and 7th degrees).
#19
Quote by opiekundps2015
Note d?


A?

This post is way too cryptic to give any answer.  Which tunes are  you referring to?
#21
All this talk about major and minor and you didn't include that in your answers?
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#22
tbf, the original question was talking about notes

however, OP, can you answer about major or minor for those two songs?
#24
Quote by opiekundps2015
 ODE - major   
House - minor? 

Correct.
Your keynote guesses (D for Ode and A for House) are also correct. (House of the Rising Sun can be played in various keys, but Am is most common. Ode was originally in D major, although some beginner sheet music versions are in C.)
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 10, 2017,
#25
opiekundps2015

So how did you come up with D major and A minor? What makes them major/minor (why those instead of modes)?
#26
Quote by jongtr

Assuming you're talking modes, the traditional jazz method is to use two chords.  The primary chord contains any note of the mode except the character note.  The secondary contrasting chord contains that note.
So, for D dorian, you could use Dm7, Dm9, Dm11, D9sus4, etc. as primary chord (none of which contain B).  For the other chord, you could use G, G7, G9, Em7, Cmaj7 (all of which contain B).  The most common choices are Dm7 and G7, or Dm7 and Em7

This is a great starting point.
#27
 So how did you come up with D major and A minor? 

Because  Ode  have happy/funny mood and House is sad/"fun(ny)eral"  :p 

I found something interesting
but I still do not understand how they recognize mode


1. Ionian:

G Ionian: Cliffs of Dover - Eric Johnson
G Ionian: Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring - J.S. Bach
G Ionian: Brown-eyed Girl - Van Morison
E Ionian: Beast of Burden - The Rolling Stones
F Ionian: Call Me Al - Paul Simon
F Ionian: Free Falling - tom Petty
C Ionian: Down on the Corner - CCR
C Ionian: Like a Rolling Stone - Bob Dylan
C Ionian: Let It Be - The Beatles
D Ionian: Goodbye to Romance - Ozzy Osbourne
D Ionian: Ode To Joy - Beethoven
B Ionian: Always With Me, Always With You - Joe Satriani

2. Dorian:

D and Eb Dorian: So What - Miles Davis (melody is in the bass line)
D Dorian: Another Brick IN the Wall part 2 - Pink Floyd
E Dorian Scarborough Fair - Simon and Garfunkel
E Dorian: A Horse with no name - America
E Dorian: Riders On the Storm - The Doors
E Dorian: Who Will Save Your Soul - Jewel
E Dorian: Eleanor Rigby - The Beatles
A Dorian: Fly Like an Eagle - the Steve Miller Band
F# Dorian: Godzilla - Blue Oyster Cult
G Dorian: Surfing With The Alien - Joe Satriani
Ab Dorian: Light My Fire - The Doors (solo section only!)

3. Phrygian:

A Phrygian: Mr. Man - Alicia Keys (melody also uses harmonic minor on the V chord)
C Bemsha Swing - Thelonious Monk
F# Phrygian: White Rabbit - Jefferson Airplane

added by sonomatips:
Keith Jarrett's tune 'Spiral Dance' fron his "Belonging" album is in phrygian mode.


4. Lydian:

Theme music from The Simpsons and the Jetsons
C lydian: Flying In A Blue Dream - Joe Satriani
G Lydian: Jane Says - Jane's Addiction
D Lydian: Hey Jealousy - the Gin Blossoms
D Lydian: Oceans - Pearl Jam
C Lydian E.T. Theme - John Williams
A Lydian: Here Comes My Girl - Tom Petty (intro and verses)
E Lydian: Hog Heaven - Frank Zappa

5. Mixolydian:

E Mixolydian: Norwegian Wood - The Beatles
E Mixolydian: Folsom Prison Blues - Johnny Cash
D Mixolydian: Bodysnatchers and Give UP the Ghost - Radiohead
E Mixolydian: NO Rain - Blind Melon
E Mixolydian: I'm So Glad - Cream
Ab Mixolydian: On Broadway - George Benson
A Mixolydian: Jessica - The Allman Brothers Band
G Mixolydian: Lowrider - War
D Mixolydian: Dear Prudence - The Beatles
D Mixolydian or G Ionian: Sweet Home Alabama - Lynyrd Skynyrd
Db Mixolydian: Sweet Child O' Mine - Guns 'n Roses (solo section in Eb Aeolian)
A Mixolydian: Dark Star and Fire ON the Mountain - The Grateful Dead
Eb Mixolydian: Here Comes Your Man - Pixies
* Scottish bagpipe music is sort of in Bb Mixolydian.

6. Aeolian:

A Aeolian: Black Orpheus - Luis Bonfa
A Aeolian: Rhiannon - Fleetwood Mac
A Aeolian: I Kissed a Girl - Katie Perry
A Aeolian: First Tube - Phish
A Aeolian: Losing My Religion - R.E.M.
B Aeolian: Building a Mystery - Sara McLachlan
C Aeolian: You Give Love a Bad Name - Bon Jovi
C Aeolian: Sweet Dreams" - the Eurythmics or Marilyn Manson
C Aeolian: Blue Bossa - Kenny Dorham (the bridge modulates up a semi-tone to Ionian)
C Aeolian: All Along the Watchtower - Jimi Hendrix
D Aeolian: Sultans of Swing - Dire Straits
D Aeolian: Black Magic Woman: Fleetwood Mac or Santana (ending section of the Santana version is in D mixolydian)
E Aeolian: Paranoid - Black Sabbath

7. Locrian (added by akmbirch)

British folk song artist, John Kirkpatrick, "Probably the only song in the revival repertoire written in the Locrian mode "Dust To Dust"

http://www.pgmusic.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=251088
Last edited by opiekundps2015 at Mar 14, 2017,
#28
Quote by opiekundps2015
Because  Ode  have happy/funny mood and House is sad/"fun(ny)eral"  :p 

I found something interesting
but I still do not understand how they recognize mode
By asking two questions:

1. What is the scale (the collection of notes) used?
2. Which note is the keynote (aural tonal centre)?

Those can be answered in either order - i.e., you can listen for a keynote first and then find out what other notes there are.
The question of "mood" doesn't arise. It's not necessary.
Taking "Brown-Eyed Girl", it's quite easy to establish that the melody and chords are all derived from the set of notes A B C D E F# and G. And it's quite easy to hear that the keynote is G. That means the tune is in the "key of G major". (That's a better term than "Ionian mode".)
Taking Miles Davis's "So What". The melody and chords employ all the natural notes A B C D E F G, and the tonal centre is clearly D. That's what we define as "D dorian mode". (And we hear the entire set of notes move up a semitone in the bridge, to Eb dorian.)

Incidentally, some of the examples you quoted are debatable, in that they are not all good examples of the modes in question.

Eleanor Rigby: This is a minor key "mode mixture", being mostly aeolian, occasionally dorian, and also including a harmonic/melodic minor raised 7th in one descending line. The chords (essentially just Em and C) are from E aeolian.

Riders on the Storm: The main vamp and interlude and solos is dorian, but the verse sequence contains a C from E aeolian. So another "mode mixture" tune.

White Rabbit: phrygian dominant (major phrygian), not phrygian. And that's only if you think the F# chord is the key chord. Some would say the key was A major, because that's suggested by the rest of the sequence.

Simpsons Theme: lydian dominant, not lydian.

Bemsha Swing: has arguable phrygian cadences to C, but (again) major phrygian, not plain C phrygian - and mostly it's a common collection of bebop chord subs, with nothing to do with C phrygian.

Norwegian Wood: starts in mixolydian but moves to dorian (Em7-A), and then a major key ii-V (F#m-B). (Better examples of mixolydian in Beatles songs are Tomorrow Never Knows and She Said She Said.)

Folsom Prison Blues: This is a standard 12-bar blues in E, not mixolydian.

Black Orpheus, Blue Bossa and Sultans of Swing: These are all conventional (classical) minor key, not aeolian mode. I.e., Natural minor (aeolian) but with frequent harmonic minor alterations. (Good examples of Aeolian mode need to avoid the raised 7th and major V chord. Such as Losing My Religion or All Along the Watchtower,)
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 14, 2017,
#29
In your free time could You listen this songs
and tell me somethiong about modes in verse and chorus 
because it seems to me that the modes are changed :p


Gwen Stefani - What You Waiting For?
The Fugees - Ready or Not
Enej - Skrzydlate Ręce
Haddaway - What Is Love

The Black Eyed Peas - Shut Up 
Old School Band - Jubilee *
Old School Band - King of the Zulus *

Eurythmics - Sweet Dreams 
Abba - Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!
Madonna - Frozen

Bobby McFerrin - Good Lovin,Susie-Q, All I Want, Drive My Car,Sunshine of Your Love(cover)
Skunk Anansie - Charlie Big Potato
Skin - Faithfulness


*  ( author is Louis Armstrong but his version is different )
#30
Please be careful with the word "mode":



How confident are you with diatonic chords and harmony? Diatonic chords: chords that are in key and have no extra accidentals.

I think modal mixture and modes are two things you've mixed together, but just want to make sure, plus since you've added so many tab requests, I'm not sure you're actually listening to the music yourself and understanding with your own ears
#31
jongtr He's a very talented guy with a good understanding of music theory and a really good ear.  I'm not gong to argue the point one way or another I don't necessarily agree with what everyone says, but it's a shame he's not here to defend his position on those points.
Si