#1
Hey guys!

I'm a guitarist, rocker and love getting high on the rush you get when going to a gig!
I am also a UX Design Master's student.

I am conducting a research, with the ultimate goal of helping musicians collaborate. To achieve this, I first need to understand where issues and conflicts arise. So I would like to involve you guys

This is a completely open conversation. I am interested in any experience you might have had as collaborating musicians. There are only four things in addition I would be greateful if you could specify:

1. Are you a hobbyist or professional musician? Professional would be defined as someone who makes a living through music in this case.
2. What were the circumstance, ie.: a band rehearsing, online collaboration, jamming, etc..
3. What conflicts did you encounter when collaborating with other musicians?
4. What do you think caused the problem and how did you resolve it?

Cheers
Last edited by gnrfreek at Mar 8, 2017,
#2
First of all, this is most likely the worst place to do research you can think of. As someone who majors in, well, exactly the subject of this thread, I can tell you that you'd be better off getting in contact with local musicians you can talk to face to face, or send proper questionnaires to music majors and musicians in your area. Also, four questions is so narrow that it would never qualify as research, and asking open questions without any form will not result in accurate data.

1. That's a tricky question, as I do study music but I don't study musicianship. So, I do practically get a living out of music, but it's not via gigging or selling my own music. So, I guess a hobbyist still, as you're looking for performing musicians as far as I can tell?

2. I've usually gotten in contact with others either through the internet or by meeting them face to face, and I've been doing band rehearsals mostly.

3. Some musicians I've met just have been asshats. The kind of people who walk to your amp mid song to turn it down so that I can't hear it anymore (since their guitar tone is more important), or people who thrash the equipment of other people as "a joke". I've also encountered people who've tried to present music that's straight up stolen as their own.

4. The problem was caused by people behaving like idiots and I resolved the problem by quitting the band.

If you need some tips on how to conduct proper research feel free to ask, this is practically my speciality.

Also "only two things" -> asks four questions
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
Thanks for replying, I really appreciate it. This is only my preposition, part of my secondary research so I get an idea what to look for when I actually go and observe musicians during their sessions!  
#5
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Perhaps an anonymous survey would be better as a medium

This is pretty anonymous, I don't know who you are  
Also, I don't need to write a report, the outcome is a design solution so I can assure you that even usernames won't be mentioned/published anywhere! 
#6
Quote by gnrfreek
This is pretty anonymous, I don't know who you are  
Also, I don't need to write a report, the outcome is a design solution so I can assure you that even usernames won't be mentioned/published anywhere! 
The username connection is enough to make it not completely anonymous, though. Using username aliases is not really anonymous. Not knowing someone by their given username doesn't mean you can't find personal information about someone using their username

A better gauge of anonymity is via a survey form, which attaches some ID to responses, but the ID is arbitrary, like the order of filling out the form; that has nothing to do with the identity of the person
#7
NeoMvsEu I understand your concern and I appreciate your advise. I have discussed at length with my teacher and he agreed that this is a better method for me to use over surveys. I can reiterate what I already mentioned, that I will not use peoples' usernames in my report.
#8
Quote by gnrfreek I have discussed at length with my teacher and he agreed that this is a better method for me to use over surveys. 

This sounds weird. I won't argue with you if you've made up your mind but all I can say is this method sucks

As you might have noticed, the only people who've replied to your thread have been mods mostly raising concerns about your method. And having two replies, only one of which gave you some half-assed answers, is not research data.

If this thread does get more attention and people engage in discussion and you get some ideas out of it that's great, but don't get your hopes up.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#9
 
I feel like I might need to explain my process here, seeing as you guys don't agree with me. 

First, I am conducting a qualitative research and not a quantitative one. 

As there are no scholarly researches on musician collaboration anywhere I have looked (only articles/researches on how to do it well), these forum posts will only represent my secondary research. I am already seeing patterns emerging for topics to further investigate from these posts, that is the only purpose of them. 

The next phases:

1. I will be observing bands as they conduct their regular sessions twice
2. In between the two sessions, they will get a diary card to fill out at home about the session and some other details
3. I will conduct an hour long interview session with these participants (one-on-one to avoid bias of other bandmates) 

I hope this clears things up. I know that qualitative researches aren't accepted by all, but as I am a UX student this is the process I am learning and need to follow. If you don't agree with this, I can't really do anything about it but thank you for taking the time to read what I wrote and trying to understand my process. 

If you are interested, I am following the double diamond design process, you can read about it in more detail here: http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/sites/default/files/asset/document/ElevenLessons_Design_Council%20(2).pdf 
#10
I see nothing wrong with the research you're doing locally; seems like a well thought out project.

What I don't get is how this forum post connects to the research at all. Asking for opinions in a forum is pretty much the epitome of quantitative research, except what you lack is quantity. You say you already see patterns emerge, when the only post that even acknowledged your questions was my first post, which was very shallow. And a single, shallow post meets neither qualitative nor quantitative research requirements.

When it comes to your primary research, I think you have a pretty good plan going on. I'm preparing for two qualitative researches right now (I need to present both to my courses in a couple of weeks) and in my opinion the next phases of your project seem very solid.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#11
Thanks man and good luck to both of us then!
 I have posted on multiple forums, not just here. On other forums I have received more replies, thus I am saying I can already see patterns emerging  

Really the purpose of this was for me to know what to zone in on during my primary research. It gave me especially a direction for the types of questions for the diary card. 
#12
gnrfreek 

1: not a full time pro, but have gigged a lot.

2: band rehearsal, studio recording and tracking, hiring online session players etc.

3 and 4:  Some random thoughts:

conflicts typically arise when one person either doesn't learn a part properly or simply plays something that the main composer doesn't like stylistically - those are typically the main sources of conflict that I see in composing/recording stages.  By failing to learn a part properly,  I mean slogging through it without the fine details.

I often run into that problem when I craft bass or guitar parts and then need someone else to play them.  Great players will make the parts better, mediocre players will dumb it down. Either way, in a band you have to compromise and let go somewhat, otherwise the micromanaging aspect kills the vibe and people quit. A huge source of conflict ends up being creative control - that's why so many people end up as solo acts - they don't understand how to let go and not micromanage.

The cliche often ends up being true, lead singers tend to be drama heavy, controlling and neurotic - they can also also try and place themselves above all other members - I've seen countless bands breakup for those reasons. 

Work ethic is another source of conflict - it's difficult to find similarly dedicated players of the same caliber who are prepared to put in the hours. This is especially true for people who are not full-time professional musicians. 

If you have a vanity project you want to micromanage, then open your wallet and hire people to deliver - don't expect band members to work on that kind of project pro-bono.   If you have musicians who are working for free, i.e. friends etc., then give them some creative input to keep them motivated and to give them a sense of ownership over the project. 


  
#13
I like working with a collaborator but just one at a time. I've tried the thing where several people have input into the writing and it doesn't work out for me. I find this especially true with lyrics. Good lyrics that relate a story or an idea usually work best with one or two writers who share a common understanding of where the lyrics should go and what theme those lyrics create. Once a song has been written (verses, chorus, melody) I like to open it up and present it to other musicians and get their help with the arrangement.  I find it fascinating to watch your original concept change with the suggestions of others in how to best present the song. You get an opportunity to feed off others strengths by trying something they suggest be it a tempo change, a key change, a change in overall style. You'll find that often some very small suggestion really makes the song better or takes it somewhere you didn't envision yourself. It also gets other musicians seriously invested in the creation of the project. It's still your song and you wrote it but many times the real collaboration is not in the writing it's in the arrangement.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.