#1
something to maybe pick up the process, other than just practicing more, which i am doing.
for instance: going from from an F major to a C7 back and forth, and landing my fingers on the chords properly.
seems like it isn't getting better and just comes out sloppy. especially when i go back and forth to each chord real fast, or try too.
thanks
begginer geetarest.
#2
Exact landing on chord transitions comes with time and practise. Eventually you don't even think about what each finger is doing, it just happens automatically.

Are you going from 133211 to X32310, or just XX3211 to X32310 ? The latter is quite easy, as fingers 1 2 3 retain a similar shape. The hard part is cleanly dropping the 4 little finger onto 3rd fret of G string.
#3
The most important thing to do when changing chords is placing all the fingers involved at the same time in one motion - do not place them one at a time one after the other. That bad habit will stick and slow you down.

No matter how slow you have to go at first, put all the fingers for the new chord down at the same instant. Try it in super slow motion to make sure, then gradually increase chord change speed, and make sure you do this for each new chord you learn so your hands do it right for all chords.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#4
gbaddeley I'm doing the 133211 to X32310. i'm cool with the time and practice. but i'm looking to get from point A to point B sooner than later if possible. 
begginer geetarest.
#5
PlusPaul yes. i am focusing on placing all my fingers at once. i'm trying to think of something to push my ability, to speed it up. my slowness on some chords is nerve rackingly slow, and still sounds like garbage. 
begginer geetarest.
#6
The speed you want to develop is clean articulate speed that feels effortless, natural, and sounds good. Play as slow as you need to keep those qualities and speed will come as an indirect result of working on doing all of the little mechanical things properly. Don't push for speed; focus on doing things smoothly, clearly, and comfortably, and let speed find its own way into your hands...
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#7
Lloyd_rogers do you use justin's guitar course?  Sounds like his methods, such as the one-minute changes and air changes exercises, would help.  What might also help is what I did as a brand new player:

1-do the chord changes in the dark, never looking at the fretboard so I'd learn by feel
2-incorporate strumming patterns to the chord changes to make them more "real" as part of a song

www.justinguitar.com
Last edited by transwarp at Mar 10, 2017,
#8
PlusPaul that all makes sense. but i still want to find a tactic to pick up the speed accurately. maybe i shouldn't be in a hurry, but i would like to play one song that sounds normal. just for the satisfaction. 
begginer geetarest.
#10
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
PlusPaul that all makes sense. but i still want to find a tactic to pick up the speed accurately. maybe i shouldn't be in a hurry, but i would like to play one song that sounds normal. just for the satisfaction. 

Overcoming desire for instant gratification is our greatest challenge as guitarists and musicians.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#11
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
gbaddeley I'm doing the 133211 to X32310. i'm cool with the time and practice. but i'm looking to get from point A to point B sooner than later if possible. 

OK. Make the F shape and pick each string low to high, taking about 3 seconds. Each string must sound clean and sustained with no muffling or muting. Switch to C7 and do the same. These 2 chords require strength and accuracy in all 4 fingers.
#12
Lloyd_rogers The exercises that focus on improving the speed of chord changes can sometimes be rather simplistic, just changing back and forth between the two chords as many times as one possibly can in 60 seconds' time, so I began using a strumming pattern like D-U-D-U-D-U-D-U, etc for one bar and then switch to another chord keeping in time and rhythm so as to make the changes more akin to playing a song.  I might also stick another chord change on the 3-count within the bar so as to increase the number of changes while retaining the strumming.  It makes the changes more realistic and closer to actually playing a song, IMO.
#13
It is important that you practise with a pulse.  The technique I teach is firstly make sure both chords are clean.  When you know that the chords sound good, set up a metronome or drum machine to a fairly slow tempo (around 70bpm is fine).  Play the first chord and hold it for 4 beats.  Then, during the next four beats, change to the next chord.  Give yourself plenty of time.  You have to be relaxed to make sure your fingers move more easily.  Always think of the chord you are changing to, not the chord your fingers are on.  Cycle this around until you have completed four good changes in a row.  

Next, still using the pulse, play the first chord and as soon as you have played it, change to the next chord.  Wait until the end of the 4 beats of the pulse and then strum the second chord.  Change back to the 1st chord as soon as you have strummed it and repeat this until you can do four good repetitions.

Then add another strum on the 2nd beat.  You will now have only 2 beats in which to change chord.  Again, do four good repetitions and then add another strum, this time on beat 3.  You now have to change chord in the space of one beat.  Again, do four good repetitions.

Finally, add another strum on beat 4.  You now have to change chord in between beat 4 of the first bar and beat 1 of the second bar.  You should now be well on your way to bring able to change between any two chords.

For the record, the two chords I start pupils with are Em and G.  
Last edited by Majicmanmaj at Mar 10, 2017,