#2
Not going to watch, but:

play some different genres - jazz, country, motown, whatever
find a cheap(but decent) second-hand bass or - if you have the space - drum kit, or any other instrument you fancy - saxophone, fiddle, accordion, whatever

diversify a bit.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#5
I find that I can still make progress (I'm over 70) by working on different techniques. I've found that a good way to develop technique is to take a tune I know very well and transpose it from one technique to another, eg fingerpicking to lap steel. By doing that I don't have to think about two things at once, the notes in the tune, and how I'm going to play them. I also work on music that is challenging, eg Bert Jansch in my case.
#6
Try doing the opposite...?

- turn off the drive and effects
- switch to jazz standards (all the cool guys are doing this)
- slow down
- learn whole songs
- forget making videos and find people to play out with in public
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#7
Petruccinator45 I watched 3 of your videos, and your approach is the same on each.  The playing is accurate enough, but it doesn't come across that you mean it ... some things I suggest to help with where you are is note articulation, investigate mixing in damped notes, use of legato, dressing up how you get in and out of a lick, and the vibrato could be a lot more expressive.  Have a closer listen to the original solo, especially vibrato and use of whammy bar.

If you're bored with current music, find other nusic that inspires you to want to (try and) play it ... there are so many different styles.

Challenge yourself.  Personally, I studied harmony and jazz when I found myself in a dead end.  I'm still studying ... but different aspects ... and I've been playing for decades.

Set time aside to  improve chord vocabulary.  Learn to play in many keys if you don't know this.   Above all, let your emotion come out in your playing ,,, playing by rote can be very uninspiring..  

All good advice from the other guys.
#8
Hello guys , i need another help. How should i arrange my practice routine ? I have got 1h and 30 min every day in week except Friday. Friday i can practice 4h and on Saturday and Sunday even 8h  
How can i break down my practice routine effectively ? 

Thx for answers  
PS: Sorry for my English , im not from England  
#9
It's great you have so much time, but you may not need to do so much ... the important thing is effective practice that moves you forward.  Plus you want to spend some time analysing tunes you like, understanding where the note choices come from. song structure (rhythmic structure),  And of course, playing tunes, learning new tunes that challenge you a bit more, and jamming, ideally with better players.

Hard to say what to practice without knowing your goals and motivators, and styles of interest. A general point is this: spending a lot of time on stuff you can already do well is not really forward-moving practice. That sort of stuff can be topped-up with little time and effort.

Practice-wise, some of the usual areas are:

1/ tools for making music ... intervals, scales, how chords are built from scales, rhythm. Chord progressions. Melodic resolutions.
2/ fretboard navigation ... e.g.,stayiing in area of neck arounfd 2 to 6th fret (roughly), play maj scale in several keys.  Adapt to whatever scales are useful to you
3/ visualisation ... especially intervals. Can't emphasise this enough.
4/ ear-training combined with visualisation
5/ rhythmic practice ... different time signatures, triplets, etc.
6/ rhythmic practice ... phrasing.
7/ chord vocabulary
8/ licks, lines ... working these into other tunes
9/ technique, whihc breaks down into many areas.  For you, I' especially recommend developing your vibrato
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Mar 12, 2017,
#11
Petruccinator45 All the guys you mention have great theoretical knowledge (at least within modal frameworks, but not sure about jazz), and all have complete freedom over the fretboard.  Petrucci and Vai also have a lot of experience with rhythmic concepts (odd time signatures, rhythmic groupings, polyrhythms).

Do you know your intervals (shapes, sounds) on the neck?  Do you use any of CAGED, 5-regions, or 3 notes-per-string?  Can you improvise horizontally along one or two strings?  Which scale types do you know? Do you know about substitutions?  Can you pick out any subdivision accurately and repeatedlly (e.g. the third triplet)?
#12
Well , i dont , because i was practicing only techniques , but i see , that im really weak in theory Do you know good videos or web pages , where i can learn something ?  
#13
Practicing more than an hour may not be productive. The purpose of practice is to learn something, which takes effort, focus, and energy... after an hour of real practice your reserves are going to be near depleted and further pushing won't pay off. You can always come back later and go another useful hour.

I would suggest a good practice session should go through a few stages to get best results.

Gently and slowly begin whatever excercises you use. This will be the first 10 minutes where you are front loading the least interesting part of the practice (excercises as warm up). The exercises need to be started slowly and deliberately anyway, so these serve as a good warm up for your hands.

Once you are warmed up, review the recent things you have learned from previous practising (like a business meeting - old business is called first, then new business). Be sure you touch on everything even if you don't go into detail; the worst waste is to have made the effort to learn something and then forgotten it.

After reviewing, select a new thing to work on - a song, a technique, a chord change... (like jerrykramskoy's list of 9 things). Have something specific in mind; the intro to the song, the fingering or picking of the technique, how to smooth out or play over the chord change.

The last part of every practice your goal is to explore and discover something new. This means listening for musical relationships you have not grasped before. This is experimenting with what happens when you change the chords in a progression, change the notes in a chord, etc.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#14
Petruccinator45 See https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1730078, but be quick.  We can definitely help you here, for free.  But you will need to put in some effort (we let you know what) so we get feedback.  You get to keep emuso for life, with fixes, upgrades for free.  By the end of the trial, you will know intervals and basic chords very well (this trial targets beginner players as far as theory is concerned ... the full product and lessons go to advanced jazz, for example). No musical notation involved.  You will also get a small idea of what else the software can do (modes, (custom) tunings with all chords and scales realigning, custom scales, string-skip patterns,custom chords, moving guitar voicings to piano etc, interactive tests on-instrument to check your understanding, auto chord generation from scales (up to 13ths), chord analysis ... plus a load of stuff around rhythm. technique practice, timing practice , ear training...).  This is the last trial with free software. 
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Mar 13, 2017,
#15
jerrykramskoy Hello , thank you ! But the mail which you let in text is bad , i cant send you mail :/ I would like to learn all those things , because im noob in guitar theory  
P.S : My english is very bad , so please by patient  
#20
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Petruccinator45 I watched 3 of your videos, and your approach is the same on each.  The playing is accurate enough, but it doesn't come across that you mean it ... some things I suggest to help with where you are is note articulation, investigate mixing in damped notes, use of legato, dressing up how you get in and out of a lick, and the vibrato could be a lot more expressive.  Have a closer listen to the original solo, especially vibrato and use of whammy bar.

If you're bored with current music, find other nusic that inspires you to want to (try and) play it ... there are so many different styles.

Challenge yourself.  Personally, I studied harmony and jazz when I found myself in a dead end.  I'm still studying ... but different aspects ... and I've been playing for decades.

Set time aside to  improve chord vocabulary.  Learn to play in many keys if you don't know this.   Above all, let your emotion come out in your playing ,,, playing by rote can be very uninspiring..  

All good advice from the other guys.


I agree with this....you look (sounds weird to say) but not really connected to what you are playing...the Petrucci lick I thought sounded the best of everything you played...but have some fun with things...get angry, get funny, get passionate and intense ...you are a human communicating through an instrument...add that thought process into your arsenal and watch things grow for you...and start to really connect maybe not only more for you and your current "feelings" (that you are stagnating) but for people who hear you play.  Your excitement and ferocity etc...will affect the listener. best of luck!
Last edited by Nadda2 at Mar 13, 2017,
#21
I had an old teacher tell us that your musical career can be broken into three task. theory, repertoire and technique. Theory can be mastered in a few years, but technique and especially repertoire can give you enough new material to last a life time. Have you tried learning songs by ear? Can you improvise in all twelve keys? Do you know all your major, minor, dominant seventh and major seventh chords? Do you know all your arpeggios? Have you learned any exotic scales such as the whole tone scale or the phrygian dominant scale? I recommend http://all-guitar-chords.com/ to learn scales and chords. justinguitar.com, guitarlessons365.com and Chris Zoupa on Youtube are great resources I have found very helpful. Try to take breaks in between practicing. I've found that marathon practicing can easily burn me out and proves to be very unhelpful. I try to practice for one or two hours at the most and take a break for at least thirty minutes before I practice again. Remember that practice does not make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect. You don't want to reinforce bad technique or waste your time with bad practicing. Personally, bad practicing is one of my greatest fears and one of the most difficult things I've encountered as a musician.
#22
I'd also suggest write a few songs. It's fun, takes discipline and thought. And will put to work things you've been learning (copying) from other bands and players .
#23
hello , i know , i should practice , but i really like this solo , so i recorded it and wanna see your opinion on my perfomance  
#24
  I studied from Rock Discipline (JP) but im bored. I wanna play better and better , but i cant move out from my playing.  









Last edited by opiekundps2015 at Apr 19, 2017,
#27
Hello guys , i made a very big progress but i have one question

I have bought book called Peter Fischer - Rock guitar secrets (or something like that). There are lot of scales and arpeggios , licks ... 

Whats your experience with this book ? How should i use it ? 

Thx , sorry for my English :/