why does sheet music show sharp symbols to the far left, when none of the notes are sharp/flat?

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#41
Quote by CelestialGuitar

no one here is an advanced sight reader or deals with classical musicians.

BS

Though I agree that in most cases a key signature with both sharps and flats in it looks a bit confusing, especially if we are talking about tonal music with functional harmony. If not, I'm not sure, but I would still prefer a traditional key signature simply because that's what most people are used to and it makes the notation easier to read. The issue with traditional notation is that it's designed for the diatonic scale. Maybe another kind of notation would work better for "exotic" scales?
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#42
Quote by CelestialGuitar
You just said 'So there' to try and end an argument. 


Your post suggests that you've nothing left to offer in defense of your position to everyone who sees it.
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
#43
Quote by MaggaraMarine
The issue with traditional notation is that it's designed for the diatonic scale. Maybe another kind of notation would work better for "exotic" scales?


I just can't comprehend how it would be mindbendingly impossible for people to see Bb, Eb, and F# in the key signature and think, "okay, we're playing in Gm but all the 7ths are gonna be sharpened." I could understand putting F# and D# together as being slightly tricky since at a quick glance it looks suspiciously close to D major, but with mixed sharps and flats?
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
#44
Quote by theogonia777
I just can't comprehend how it would be mindbendingly impossible for people to see Bb, Eb, and F# in the key signature and think, "okay, we're playing in Gm but all the 7ths are gonna be sharpened."  I could understand putting F# and D# together as being slightly tricky since at a quick glance it looks suspiciously close to D major, but with mixed sharps and flats?

If you're playing in G minor, you generally expect 7ths to be sharpened anyway.
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#45
Why would you just expect that? Maybe I just don't understand that assumption since apparently you've decided that I don't work with classical musicians. And if I should generally be expecting that, why not throw that F# in the key signature?
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
#46
Sigh

The way the thing was notated suggested that D was the tonal center, thus making it (among other names) Phrygian Dominant and not G harmonic minor, so it's not necessarily a tonal framework again

I like the idea of alternative notation if the music is "exotic", but can't help but wonder if people would make hierarchies for their notes the same way that tonal function works in Western classical/pop tradition
#47
... failure to do so suggests very poor musicianship to everyone who sees it...

everyone = those people who can read sheet music and understand music theory. 
Other people won't understand it, including before-mentioned respected musicians.
There is no point arguing about sheet music notation and scales for western equal-temperament music, it has been pretty much unchanged for hundreds of years.
Classical musicians would be lost without it.
#48
ET is a recent invention and has much further reach than music of the past century, though period performers might object. Using the term "Western classical (music)" is sufficiently clear

People can understand anything given enough time and explanation, and one trend of the modern classical era is to experiment with the same sheet music that is being discussed rn. Tbh, handwritten music can be much harder to read than a simple non-standard key signature alteration

However nice this little tangent is, it really doesn't have much to do with OP's question, FYI
#49
Quote by gbaddeley
Classical musicians would be lost without it.


tbf it's not easy to get a classical musician lost. You just have to ask them to actually memorize a piece or even worse... improvise.

Quote by NeoMvsEu
However nice this little tangent is, it really doesn't have much to do with OP's question, FYI


And? A discussion is a discussion. Just because there is an original topic does not need to be followed. Classical music is the same. You get teachers that tell students that they have to do it a certain way just because. You know the guy that invented ragtime? His piano teacher told him the "rules" of classical music and the student told him to sod off and then he didn't listen to his teacher and created ragtime. Then, against his teacher's advice, he started hanging around blues musicians and then they invented jazz. And then jazz musicians started hanging with cowboys and then they invented Western swing. And then the Cowboys started hanging out with Hank Williams and invented country. And the country musicians started hanging out with rhythm and blues musicians and invented rock. And so because a piano student went against the conventions of classical music and thought independently, music actually got interesting.
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
#50
Quote by theogonia777
Why would you just expect that?  Maybe I just don't understand that assumption since apparently you've decided that I don't work with classical musicians.  And if I should generally be expecting that, why not throw that F# in the key signature?

because that's how like 99% of written music works.

We all understand where you're coming from here, but you keep insisting that mixed key signatures are something that people should expect to deal with on a regular basis, and that's just not the case.

The problem is that, without any context, a mixed key signature could mean anything. If I saw something that unusual on a piece of music, I would have to drop my assumptions about the intended tonal center and actually analyze the music to figure that out. In order to make such a key signature practical, it would require some explanation beforehand, or notes on the score.

Your points here are like trying to "correct" the English language because you want everything spelled phonetically, and insisting that we should just expect to see words like "coff" and "fotograf" because it makes perfect sense to a small number of people who don't actually read or write English on a regular basis. These unusual notation systems are fine for the music that they are used with, but that doesn't mean they comport easily to standard notation or make any sense in the context of most western music.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 19, 2017,
#51
I'm not insisting that it should be expected to be a regular thing. That's something that you're just deciding.

I'm just saying that in an example like the one given it should be pretty obvious. Besides, you need to analyze the piece to determine the tonal center since two sharps for example (C and F) doesn't even tell you with 100% certainty if a piece is in D or Bm and within many songs, it's common for that tonal center to change throughout the piece, such as a tonal center of D for the verse and Bm for the bridge.

And besides, if you're given a piece and told to play it verbatim, then what difference does it even make what the tonal center is to you as the musician? Knowing or not knowing doesn't affect your ability to play the piece as written, the same way that if I gave you a list of chords, complete with the voicings, and tell you to play them. Or if I gave you tablature for a song (I know how much you hate it, but if I'm paying you to do a whatever and that's what I give you, that's what you get) and told you that all the notes are eight notes and asked you to play it. Despite the pitch not necessarily being immediately clear, you can still play it as written without knowing the tonal center or anything. When you're playing a piece exactly as written, it's the same way with sheet music. The little sharps and flats tell you what notes are sharp and flat and you just play those notes without thinking about it.

I feel like everyone is freaking out because they think people will get tripped up. Your analogy is not goid, but I'll go with you anyway. I mean, do honestly think that if someone read a sentence that goes, "2day I took a fotograf of my dawg," people would have to sit down and analyze the whole since to figure out what the sentence is saying? To be fair though, as a German speaker I wouldn't think twice about "fotograf" beyond the lack of capitalization.
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
#52
Here, let's try something. Here is a piece of music. You're doing a recording session and the producer says, "play this," and hands you the following. Could you play it? That's literally all the producer wants you to do. Do you think he cares if you can tell the tonal center just by looking at the key signature?

Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Mar 19, 2017,
#53
I would have no trouble interpreting and reading this. It is how I would prefer it for me.
But, like a few have said, I am apparently a poor musician, I don't work with Classical musicians, I need to be educated, I am not an advanced sight reader, bla bla. All this is news to me. 

To make it more interesting theogonia777 

The producer has given the exact same score to the flute player and the violin player. They both said  they have no problem interpreting the score.
The guitarist gets one shot. What would most play as the start note? What string and fret number? What question should the guitarist have asked?
#54
tbf it's not easy to get a classical musician lost. You just have to ask them to actually memorize a piece or even worse... improvise.

Not quite sure what you meant by this point. It depends how good / confident they are. Classical soloists quite often perform lengthy works without the music in front of them, and can improvise on a theme, and in any nominated key.
And so because a piano student went against the conventions of classical music and thought independently, music actually got interesting.

Agree. Eg. Debussy, Gerswhin. Musical development and style is a natural progression.
And besides, if you're given a piece and told to play it verbatim, then what difference does it even make what the tonal center is to you as the musician? Knowing or not knowing doesn't affect your ability to play the piece as written, the same way that if I gave you a list of chords, complete with the voicings, and tell you to play them.

To be pedantic, no, but knowing the tonal center makes it easier. In a long scale run over many octaves, I'm not going to read every note every time, I'll just play the scale instinctively, knowing the key signature and the start and end notes in relation to the tonal center (root). Part of the skill of sight reading is immediately recognising chunks of notes in chord inversions or sequences.
Here, let's try something. Here is a piece of music. You're doing a recording session and the producer says, "play this," and hands you the following. Could you play it? That's literally all the producer wants you to do. Do you think he cares if you can tell the tonal center just by looking at the key signature?

I would probably think "who wrote this and why?" (unconventional key signature, mixing sharps & flats, note stems on the wrong side, stems not joined)
followed by "is there a deeper meaning that I need to understand?", or "can this tonal sequence be rewritten into a key that I can play fluently without thinking?"
Otherwise I would need to consciously remember B is flat, E is flat, but F is sharp.
#55
Quote by gbaddeley
Part of the skill of sight reading is immediately recognising chunks of notes in chord inversions or sequences.

Exactly.

And this is why I think using an unconventional key signature could be a bit confusing and make sight reading more difficult - if you are not used to reading music with an unconventional key signature, it requires some extra concentration. As you said, when you read music, you really don't read every single note individually. It's a bit like when you read a book, you don't read every single letter individually.

I haven't tried sight reading music with unconventional key signatures, but I'm pretty sure at first it would be a bit confusing and I would most likely find it easier to read with a conventional key signature + accidentals.
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#56
gbaddeley, I edited your short posts into one post; you can quote multiple times in a post

theogonia777, this is not the Pit; other discussions are welcome here, but there's a "Create new thread" button

As for sheet music, the goal of the author ought to be readable score. The score is readable, but it is less instantly readable than a conventional score (reverse beaming, handwriting, arbitrary beam length) and would be much less automatic to sightread than the same thing in other forms:


A professional classical musician, even if forced to sightread entire scores, can manage several of these scores within a few hours, but it will take extra processing time before execution (playing) to adjust to non-standard score

(also, as a side note, I'd rather make the second note in the second measure natural)
#57
Quote by gbaddeley
In a long scale run over many octaves, I'm not going to read every note every time, I'll just play the scale instinctively, knowing the key signature and the start and end notes in relation to the tonal center (root). Part of the skill of sight reading is immediately recognising chunks of notes in chord inversions or sequences.


See, these are the kind of actual rational arguments that I was looking for. I mean, I still don't 100% agree with them, but those points things are logical and worth considering unlike the "because my music teacher said so"s I have been getting all thread. Thank you, good sir. : )

The rest of you take note and know that you have shamed your forefathers.

Quote by NeoMvsEu
The score is readable, but it is less instantly readable than a conventional score (reverse beaming, handwriting, arbitrary beam length)


I'm glad that the fact that I handwrite poorly was the whole focus point of that.
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Mar 20, 2017,
#60
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
NeoMvsEu the song i am doing is 'walk of life' by dire straights. 
there is sheet music for the intro organ part, made for guitar that i am using. which it sounds like i am playing it right on my guitar from that sheet music. however, none of the notes are sharp/flat. yet, these sharp symbols are to the far left on the first line. the second line is where the verse and vocals start. 
none of the chords are sharp/flat either for the rest of the song. 

As long as you keep writing things that don't isolate exactly what you are thinking, the correct answers will never come... the majority of effort to ask and answer a question really needs to be made on the asking side; think and write clearly as possible. Sometimes just clearing it up before asking will show you your answer already.

"none of the notes are sharp/flat"

Which notes?

- the notes in the score?
- the roots of chord symbols?
- the notes of chords written as stacked notes in the score?
- the roots of chords played on the guitar?
- the notes of chords played on the guitar?


If this is a lead sheet that you are calling sheet music, you won't see chord notes subject to key change indicated in the symbol unless the root or non-root bass of the symbol's corresponding chord are subject to it.

"yet, these sharp symbols are to the far left on the first line"

A key signature remains in force until it is changed. In typical scores the key signature is repeated at the beginning of each staff throughout the score. The reason for that prevents confounding empty space in the left end of the staff with a mistaken intent to shift to the key of C major / A minor.

In lead sheets, where the score is reduced to the melody line and chord symbols are substituted, it is more common to just indicate the key signature at the head of the first line and not subsequent lines... but the key signature is still in force throughout the piece unless changed.

 "none of the chords are sharp/flat either for the rest of the song"

See above about the whether the key signature is printed on subsequent lines or not...
If this is indeed sheet music, and there are chords (not just chord symbols), have you checked to see if all of the notes of those chords are not subject to alteration by the key signature?
If this is a lead sheet, have you checked to see if any of the notes of the chords indicated (not just the roots of the chord symbols) are changed by accidentals?

 
#61
Quote by theogonia777
Here, let's try something.  Here is a piece of music.  You're doing a recording session and the producer says, "play this," and hands you the following.  Could you play it?  That's literally all the producer wants you to do.  Do you think he cares if you can tell the tonal center just by looking at the key signature? 

Yes, but only after analyzing it, working out what scale it is, and then applying that to the fretboard/piano. It's just G harmonic minor, and the thing to understand about harmonic minor is that the vast majority of composers don't think of harmonic/melodic/natural minor as separate, unique scales, but rather all minors existing together as a single scale that can be altered to work in any scenario. 
So just using the key signature of Gm (which you sort of already have, just written unnecessarily unconventional by having the Eb in the wrong position) and altering the F to F# (because that's what harmonic minor is, an alteration of natural minor) in the score would not only be more conventional, but just about every sight reader would be able to immediately see "So it's the key of Bb, but the F is sharpened, so it's G harmonic minor" and I would immediately know all my positions and chords. It's been the go to way to indicate harmonic minor for centuries, and not only that but it also makes altering the scale much easier, or are you going to change the key signature every time the F changes between natural and sharp? (which in minor keys, the 7th will usually change quite frequently). There's no reason to use the unconventional signature in this case over the conventional way because the conventional way is quicker to read, tells us more about the piece like tonal center and how it's altered, and is in line with 95% of scores out there. I honestly can't think of many scenarios where experimental key signatures such as that would be any more useful or faster to read than just conventional scores that use accidentals, simply put the odds of running in to examples like that are pretty thin, 95% of scores will just be written normally.

So yes, I would read it, and then say "You'd save a lot of money on by-the-hour musicians if you didn't write such sloppy scores".
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#62
theogonia777 Posted this



I had no problem with the notes, but the non existent note grouping made me think.
I do prefer the existing method for note grouping. It gives accenting cues.

This was cleaned up by NeoMvsEu to this



Which is fine by me also, and standard, but I would still prefer to use the non standard Key Sig for me.

Both those examples have the Treble Clef or G Clef which indicate concert pitch. No mention of instrument or clef modifier noted.
Clef is French for key. How many "keys" do we have to have?

Then NSpen1 did this with tab



Which is wrong. It can be seen by the use of Tab that it is for Guitar, so the Clef modifier is commonly omitted.
The Guitar is in the transposing class of instruments, and plays an Octave lower than written.
The notes in the Tab are correct, but all an octave lower. That is not what is written in the original score.

Guitar Pro automatically writes the score an octave higher than played.
#63
Vreid, I see what you're saying, but I'm pretty sure NSpen1 interpreted your question as "if the notes were written for a guitar originally as opposed to in concert (8va vs guitar sound as written for concert tuning <=> 8vb from concert sound writing), how would it be played?" I wouldn't penalize for such an interpretation since the question was open-ended in this regard

Having said that, guitar tab is much more of a prescription "play this shape right here" than sheet music "these notes are played here", and any phrase can be played in any way as long as the player likes its effect

Incidentally, I'd probably play middle finger 18 on high E, 20 on B, and continue downwards.
#64
PlusPaul wrote: "As long as you keep writing things that don't isolate exactly what you are thinking, the correct answers will never come... the majority of effort to ask and answer a question really needs to be made on the asking side; think and write clearly as possible. Sometimes just clearing it up before asking will show you your answer already.."

"none of the notes are sharp/flat"

Which notes?

- the notes in the score?
- the roots of chord symbols?
- the notes of chords written as stacked notes in the score?
- the roots of chords played on the guitar?
- the notes of chords played on the guitar?


Paul...from what I see from the OP...Theory/and music in general are not well understood..thus the confusion..our collective attempts to "correct" the misunderstandings are failing as the basic principles of music are not reflected in the OP experience..so a key signature will be as confusing as a circle of 5ths/4ths to some with no knowledge of key structure/basic theory/harmony

what I hear the OP asking is why are there no sharp/flat signs on the staff lines if the key sig tells you to sharp/flat those notes? And why are the chords not sharp/flat as well..(chord symbols/written chords..Pretty sure the reference is to symbols/names)

now trying to explain this correctly will most likely NOT make any sense...same with those new to theory may ask..how can there be a D minor in the key of C and the key of F and have different notes in the scale-and still be D minor?
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Mar 22, 2017,
#65
Quote by theogonia777

I'm glad that the fact that I handwrite poorly was the whole focus point of that.

Well, obvious lack of familiarity with the customs of written music does kind of undermine your credibility on the topic. 

And if I were writing just a two bar phrase, I probably wouldn't bother using a key signature at all.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 22, 2017,
#66
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Vreid, I see what you're saying, but I'm pretty sure NSpen1 interpreted your question as "if the notes were written for a guitar originally as opposed to in concert (8va vs guitar sound as written for concert tuning <=> 8vb from concert sound writing), how would it be played?" I wouldn't penalize for such an interpretation since the question was open-ended in this regard

Exactly. I should have known it was a trick question.
I do know that the guitar plays an octave lower than written, but it's easy to forget that when you're working with guitar pro or tab all the time.

Incidentally, I'd probably play middle finger 18 on high E, 20 on B, and continue downwards.

Now I just have to erase the 8va and it will be 'correct'.



Vreid
Do you think if a guitarist was given sheet music to play, he/she should adjust from what they are used to doing and play everything an octave higher (concert tuning)?
Or should the music be written for guitar (so an octave higher than concert pitch) as is done in every tab book and guitar magazine, treble clef included?
#67
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Vreid, I see what you're saying, but I'm pretty sure NSpen1 interpreted your question as "if the notes were written for a guitar originally as opposed to in concert (8va vs guitar sound as written for concert tuning <=> 8vb from concert sound writing), how would it be played?" I wouldn't penalize for such an interpretation since the question was open-ended in this regard


That's how I wrote it, yeah, since everyone knows that guitar transposes. So the notes were in the right octave. I mean not the way that I would have fingered it, but it's the right notes.

Quote by cdgraves
And if I were writing just a two bar phrase, I probably wouldn't bother using a key signature at all.


I only wrote two because I'm not gonna sit there righting like 32 measures as an example.
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
#68
Quote by NSpen1


Vreid
Do you think if a guitarist was given sheet music to play, he/she should adjust from what they are used to doing and play everything an octave higher (concert tuning)?
Or should the music be written for guitar (so an octave higher than concert pitch) as is done in every tab book and guitar magazine, treble clef included?


No, of course not. If you are handed a score sheet to play on Guitar in a professional environment, it would be expected for it to be written specifically for the Guitar.(or they expect you to play it an octave lower, and are fine with that) That means you would be playing an octave lower than written, exactly as was wanted by the composer. Ideally it would have "Guitar" written on it or the Clef modifier.
We all know why it is written an octave higher than played.
If you just pick up a piece of music that was written for eg. Violin or Piano, you would have to rewrite or transpose on the go if you wanted it at intended pitch on the Guitar.

I was really only being pedantic.
NSpen1

You might already know this, but a quick way to lift all the tabbed notes an octave in relation to the standard score in Guitar Pro. (providing they are in range)
Just double click the clef. Choose the 8va. Unclick Transpose.
If you want the Tab to stay as is, but drop the score, leave transpose ticked.
#69
Quote by Vreid
You might already know this, but a quick way to lift all the tabbed notes an octave in relation to the standard score in Guitar Pro. (providing they are in range)
Just double click the clef. Choose the 8va. Unclick Transpose.
If you want the Tab to stay as is, but drop the score, leave transpose ticked.

Are you using Guitar Pro 6? Sorry, I only have 5, on which it doesn't seem possible to do.
#71
wolflen i am looking into sheet music more and more, and music theory. i figure this type of question might help get me there faster in a place like this. i might be jumping the gun with this question now. because ultimately i did figure out that single note intro from the sheet music. at least it sounds right to me.

thanks for the info. 
 
begginer geetarest.
#73
if anything that key signature everyone is arguing about looks like something that should be in front of every malmsteen tune ever LOL

this kind of stuff pops up from time to time with contemporary composers. Alternate notation isnt unheard of by any means any more and I could see someone putting some sort of melody in this signature just because they REALLY REALLY REALLY want to emphasize that its phyrigian dominant. I have played pieces by composers that do shit like that. Not standard, sure, but it happens. I prefer not mixing sharps and flats in my signatures but if an entire melody resolves to D over a drone or something and uses F# every single time then it isn't a horrible deviation from the standard practice - at least it makes sense, unlike most deviations from standard practice

and even about sloppy writing and complete disregard for notation conventions that theo put up a bit about, THAT happens ALL THE TIME and Ill tell ya what - you better not make fun of the person who wrote it when they ask you to play it.
Last edited by Vlasco at Mar 27, 2017,
#74
I have found a loophole!

For those feeling that opposite accidentals must sometimes be OK (like using a flat in a sharp key)...

In jazz, the naming of the notes in chords is functionally important for conceptual understanding of things.
This is about enharmonic intervals. So for example, in a song that is in the key of D major (a sharp key),
flats are used when they show the right "mechanics"...

A slash chord written as C/#A aligns with the key signature but ends up saying, "C, sharp 6th in the bass".
That "#A" is acting as a flat 7th of C, the flat 7th of C is Bb, so it is properly written as C/Bb

As C/Bb it properly says, "C, flat 7th in the bass".

That decision is based not on the key of D major, but the major scale of tonic C... from the root of chord C.
This is so conceptually important that despite the score note of A#, a chord name above it will show a Bb.
#75
PlusPaul

There is nothing wrong with using flats in a sharp key or sharps in a flat key. Actually, that's quite common. Bb is a pretty common accidental in the key of D major. Whether you should use sharps or flats has to do with function. Bb in the key of D major would suggest modal mixture (borrowing from the parallel minor) whereas A# would suggest a visit to the relative minor.

There are cases, though, where the note written in score and the chord symbol are different. Good examples of this would be diminished 7th chords, augmented chords and tritone substitutions. Because diminished chords are symmetrical, many times they are just named after the bass note, and you rarely see chords like F#dim7/C. Instead it would be usually written as Cdim7 which is simpler to read. The same thing applies to augmented chords. For example if our progression was Gaug-Cm, the Gaug should actually be Ebaug/G (because it wouldn't make much sense to have a D# in one chord and Eb in the next one). But because Ebaug/G and Gaug are enharmonically the same chords, it's just simpler to call it Gaug. And when it comes to tritone substitutions, there just isn't a chord symbol for a chord with an augmented 6th. I mean, if our progression is Db7-Cmaj7, it makes no sense to notate the Cb in the Db7 as Cb because the next chord has a B in it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
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