#1
I just got myself a Randall Satan head that I absolutely love.
My problem is that I don't know what cab to buy for it. I'm looking for a 4x12 cab. I'm from EU so no avatar.
My budget is around 600-700 USD. What can you recommend? (Used cabs are also an option).
#2
Have you tried any cabs/speakers which you know you already like? Better yet, have you tried any with your amp? (I haven't tried your amp so the best I can do is advise speakers which are known to work well for heavier tones in general, I'm assuming that's what you're after.)
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
Get a used Marshall 1960A/B or 1960AV/BV, if you don't like it you can sell it for what you paid for it and it will be easy to sell on because it's Marshall, if you do like it then happy days.
Cornford Hellcat
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1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#4
Anything loaded with V30 or G12H30 speakers.  Skip right over the nasty MG crap.
https://www.thomann.de/gb/4x12_guitar_cabinets.html
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Many fail to realize that speakers are only part of the equation,  As the cabinet itself also plays a big part in the tone,  Meaning the best speakers in the world wont sound very good in a cheap particle board cabinet,  Think of it along the lines of an acoustic guitar,  Expensive strings on a cheap plywood guitar may change its attitude but it still sounds like a cheap plywood guitar,  Although plywood with a cabinet isn't necessarily a bad thing,  Its just that you need to be careful as manufactures will try and throw you curve balls in this department,  Those like Mesa Boogie, Marshall, and Orange will state something like Void Free Birch Laminate,  OK, Birch plywood, but expensive plywood and combined with design and craftsmanship make for a killer cab and a price tag to match, The speakers you load it with are just a matter of preference, just as the strings you use on your guitar.   As to what you prefer I cant say,  Just make sure the cabinet is up to par,  Swapping speakers is easy, Building a cabinet ?  For me not so easy, But I got friends for that , 
#6
Not sure what local prices are like where you are but going from Thomann there are only a few "brand name" cabs with decent speakers in your budget, basically its a Marshall 4x12 with Celestion GT12T-75 or Vintage 30 speakers and they are both sitting at the top of your budget.
https://www.thomann.de/gb/marshall_mr_1960_a.htm
https://www.thomann.de/gb/marshall_mr1960bv.htm

Or you could go with something like the Harley Benton brand 4x12 with Vintage 30 speakers for a little more than half price
https://www.thomann.de/gb/harley_benton_g412a_vintage.htm

If you went that way you could use the extra cash to buy a couple more speakers like a Celestion G12T-75 or G12K-100 or an Eminience of some type and put them in an X-pattern in the 4x12 - you could then sell the other 2 V30 speakers if you wanted to get some cash back if you like the mixed speaker tone.

The other thing you might want to consider is getting a couple of 2x12s, they are easier to move around, you can take only one if that is all you need for the given situation, and they are easier to unload if you are selling them.
#7
Quote by guitarsngear
Not sure what local prices are like where you are but going from Thomann there are only a few "brand name" cabs with decent speakers in your budget, basically its a Marshall 4x12 with Celestion GT12T-75 or Vintage 30 speakers and they are both sitting at the top of your budget.
https://www.thomann.de/gb/marshall_mr_1960_a.htm
https://www.thomann.de/gb/marshall_mr1960bv.htm

Or you could go with something like the Harley Benton brand 4x12 with Vintage 30 speakers for a little more than half price
https://www.thomann.de/gb/harley_benton_g412a_vintage.htm

If you went that way you could use the extra cash to buy a couple more speakers like a Celestion G12T-75 or G12K-100 or an Eminience of some type and put them in an X-pattern in the 4x12 - you could then sell the other 2 V30 speakers if you wanted to get some cash back if you like the mixed speaker tone.

The other thing you might want to consider is getting a couple of 2x12s, they are easier to move around, you can take only one if that is all you need for the given situation, and they are easier to unload if you are selling them.

This.  The SATAN cab has 2 V30s and 2 GT12T-75s in an X-Pattern.  Obviously everyone ears are different, that's why some love V30s and some hate them, for example.  But the original cab was designed for the amp in mind.  So I would check the Randall out or one of the aforementioned similar cabs out if you don't already know what speakers you like.
#8
Quote by nastytroll
Many fail to realize that speakers are only part of the equation,  As the cabinet itself also plays a big part in the tone,  Meaning the best speakers in the world wont sound very good in a cheap particle board cabinet,  Think of it along the lines of an acoustic guitar,  Expensive strings on a cheap plywood guitar may change its attitude but it still sounds like a cheap plywood guitar,  Although plywood with a cabinet isn't necessarily a bad thing,  Its just that you need to be careful as manufactures will try and throw you curve balls in this department,  Those like Mesa Boogie, Marshall, and Orange will state something like Void Free Birch Laminate,  OK, Birch plywood, but expensive plywood and combined with design and craftsmanship make for a killer cab and a price tag to match, The speakers you load it with are just a matter of preference, just as the strings you use on your guitar.   As to what you prefer I cant say,  Just make sure the cabinet is up to par,  Swapping speakers is easy, Building a cabinet ?  For me not so easy, But I got friends for that , 



I'm not a believer. 

Most 4x12 cabinets are built with birch ply. No big deal. "Design and craftsmanship" aren't really an issue; most 4x12 cabinets look identical on the inside. It is, after all, a simple box, and if it's a standard 30" x 30" 4x12, the "design" was really laid out on the floor of a factory around the number of speakers Jim Marshall needed to handle his new 100W amps. When musicians realized that there was a nasty secondary tone being produced by the (non-designed) panel on the back of the amp, they stuck a stick (a chunk of 2x2, 2x4 or even a piece of board) running from the speaker baffle to the center of that big panel to reduce that vibration. Some "design."  The materials aren't as important as you think -- Marshall cabinets for years had (have?) an MDF speaker baffle. MDF is actually a pretty good material for speaker construction, and since the material itself should NOT contribute to the sound of a speaker cabinet (check any book on speaker cabinet design for the last 70 years or so), you'll find it in most custom car installations on the planet. The real reason NOT to use MDF is that it's not the best choice in any application where the cabinet will be in a heavily moist environment or where it has to be carted around (it's heavier than ply) or where it might sustain impact (other gear in the truck or trailer). 

Do NOT "think along the lines of an acoustic guitar when it comes to cabinets."  Instead, look INSIDE cabinets from Carvin, Marshall, Engl, Mills, etc. These cabinets can easily be $700 apart with the same speakers installed. And yet it can be nearly impossible to tell them apart on the inside. Don't fall for speaker cabinet manufacturers who will boast about finger jointed corners or "special glue designed just for us." One manufacturer showed photos of his pickup truck running over a pair of boards with corners utilizing his special corner construction compared to standard manufacturer. His corners held up beautifully. The rest of the cabinet, however, would still have been destroyed. 

Other areas NOT to be concerned about: "X" speaker installation. It's a bullet point for some manufacturers that makes absolutely no difference whatsoever. Don't bother with speaker cabinets that have "built in beam blockers." They don't work, despite glowing reviews, and they make miking the cabinet a pain in the butt. Don't worry about the size or shape of that internal "stick." Mills Acoustics touted an "Afterburner" that replaced the stick with a board with holes in it. No acoustic benefit whatsoever. All 4x12s beam treble. It's physics. Doesn't matter whether the top pair of speakers are angled slightly or not. Still happens. "Ports" in the bottom of the cabinet don't give you better bass. It's just a waste of extra wood and it takes up space. The ports are just holes that end up NOT to be correctly tuned to *anything,* and most 100W amps run out of power long before they could reproduce bottom end, and the speakers themselves don't go that low. Just BS. Orange puts a "frame" around the outside of the front of its cabinets. Makes the wood look lots thicker. The wood isn't thicker, the cabinet's not better built. All that happens is that you have some more orange tolex to get ripped. 

Tolex is not the best material to use to cover a 4x12 cabinet. It's just 60-year-old tradition. Duratex (by Acrytech) is a rubberized textured paint that replaces it on nearly every pro audio cabinet because it's available in almost any color, protects better and doesn't rip and can be easily repaired in case of a gouge or long scratch. Not so tolex. Better yet, cabinets covered in LineX are nearly bullet-proof. And it still LOOKS like tolex. Except that it's brutally tough. 

Building a cabinet is (sorry) dirt easy for even an amateur carpenter with reasonable skills, and it will rival any of those cabinets built by manufacturers. Talk to speakerhardware.com. They'll help you if you want to build your own. In fact, they've got plans and kits with cut pieces that will help you build some of the most complicated speaker cabinets on the planet.