#1
Hey. I've played for 5 years or so, but I don't really know much about guitars. I mostly play accoustic, but I want to play some electric guitar now. I usually play electric on my brothers, but it is pretty crappy.

I read something about different guitars for specific music styles. I used a lot of time searching for a good guitar on other threads, and I found the "Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus", which I kinda like. but I am afraid that it isn't good for the music I want to play. I am also unsure about the shape. it might be a little stiff and heavy for me.

I have no Idea about what kind of music this is, but I want to play stuff like this:







Any guidance is appreciated.
#2
The Epiphone by itself will not have a problem in getting that sort of tone with the right amp. The amp, the cabinet and any effects pedals you're going to be using will be a far more significant contributor to the tone than the guitar itself will be.

If you're uncertain you'll like how the guitar plays, then the only solution to that is to go play one. it must be said that Les Pauls are not the most ergonomic design in the world.
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#3
T00DEEPBLUE Thanks for the help. Never given much throught about amp and pedals. I guess I'll have to read up on that too

I already tried a similar guitar in a store, which I liked a lot. I just dont wanna buy it and later find out there was a better alternative  
There is really not many guitars to try out in stores in my country, so that kinda sucks.
#4
Casqued I appreciate that you may be heavily constrained by the availability of guitars in local stores.

Epiphone Les Pauls are generally very popular guitars. You're likely going to find at least one Epi LP model in almost any guitar store. If you play one just to get a basic idea (it doesn't necessarily have to be a Tribute) of such a guitar's ergonomics, you can make a more educated guess as to whether you'll like a Tribute or not. If you happen to really like them, the Epi Tribute guitars really are among the best LP's you're going to get in that price range if you exclude Agile's LP copies of Rondo Music. But Agiles are only going to be applicable to you if you live in or near to the US, as the cost of shipping them anywhere else (along with the taxes and custom duties such a transaction implies) heavily erode how cost-effective they are. Basically, their viability depends a lot on where exactly you live.
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#5
I'd suggest an Epi LP too.

The Traditional PRO-II is pretty good and comes with a coil split switch with makes it incredibly versatile.  They're pretty comfortable but I must warn you that they have a bigger neck radius and D neck profile, making the neck feel thicker.  You might prefer this and may in fact be a great match for you since you've been playing acoustic for so long though.  I played a couple and liked them.  The satin finish on the neck has a nice feeling and makes sliding around much easier.  These are great bang for the buck guitars.

Some Custom Pro models are also within your range.  They also sport coil splitting and the only real differences are a smaller neck radius (12 instead of 14... C profile too if i'm not mistaken) and gloss finish on the neck and back/sides of the body.  I have an old model before they got rebranded as Custom Pro and love the way it feels/looks.  The neck is a little more comfortable to me but I wish it had the Traditional's satin finish.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#6
I read something about different guitars for specific music styles. I used a lot of time searching for a good guitar on other threads, and I found the "Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus", which I kinda like. but I am afraid that it isn't good for the music I want to play. I am also unsure about the shape. it might be a little stiff and heavy for me.

You know how horror movies often have a crazy old coot who warns the main characters to turn back or they're gonna die? Then they don't listen, and he's usually 90+% right...

When I was getting into electric guitar in 2003 or so, a music store employee who fit that general description told me any guitar can be used for any style of music. He was VERY persistent. And of course, I didn't believe him then. But these days, I agree. With time, patience, experience- and the correct amp- pretty much any guitar can be used to play any genre. Now, it may be easier or harder to play some things on certain guitars, but those hurdles are more easily overcome than most imagine.

Visual aesthetics in genres are mostly about personal preferences and audience expectations. Ergonomics matter much more. Find a guitar body style and/or brand that feels good in your hands and against your body, and you can probably make it work for you.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
What country are you in? What brands do you have available?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#8
T00DEEPBLUE 

+1 The amplification chain is a lot more important than the fancy lump of wood. The "instrument is the whole deal, guitar, pickups, pedals, amp, not just the bit that you hold.

In guitars, I personally would go for some kind of HSS or HSH strat, Stel Andre is using the neck humbucker, the other two are using the bridge humbucker. - Your vids suggest that there plenty of latitude in your choices.
Last edited by Tony Done at Mar 18, 2017,
#9
All of your videos had guys playing guitars with tremolo systems (the Epiphone doesn't have one). Third video had a guy using a Super Strat style guitar with a locking tremolo that he used quite a bit, you can't do what he's doing without a tremolo. That said if you want to use the tremolo you need a quality guitar with a decent tremolo system or you will suffer tuning stability issues. A Strat with a vintage style tremolo (like in the 2nd video) is probably not advisable, even high end USA and Custom Shop guitars with exceptional quality parts need a bit of care/attention to keep good tuning stability when used a lot, quite frankly the vintage style tremolo is an inferior design in this regard.

The first video guy is using a Music Man John Petrucci signature model, with a modern style 2 point non locking tremolo. If you're going to get a tremolo on your first guitar this is the type I would recommend, it will allow you heavy use of the tremolo with good tuning stability with generally more ease of use in setup than a locking trem, and if you decide for whatever reason to block the bridge off it effectively becomes a standard hardtail guitar.

You need to decide the key features you need.

1. Trem or Hardtail
2. Single Coils or Humbuckers (or a mix) - The sound difference is quite dramatic.
3. Number of frets, vintage style guitars will have 21, more modern varients commonly 22 and shred machines will have 24.
4. Scale length - Gibson/Epiphone guitars are a shorter scale length, string tension is lower as a result (looser strings, easier bends). All of the guitars in the videos have a longer 25 1/2 inch scale length.
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Last edited by Bigbazz at Mar 18, 2017,
#10
Quote by Casqued

I read something about different guitars for specific music styles. I used a lot of time searching for a good guitar on other threads, and I found the "Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus", which I kinda like. but I am afraid that it isn't good for the music I want to play. 



My personal feeling is that "different guitars for specific music styles" is intensely overblown. Moreover, I think it's fueled by manufacturers who are interested in selling you (the very wide general "you") the largest number of guitars they can. The nearest thing I can think of that comes close to this is the shoe industry, particularly the sports shoe industry, which offers a shoe for every *position* in every sport. 

I think it's mostly baloney. 
#12
dannyalcatraz I am from Denmark. The most usual brands seems to be epiphone and Yamaha. However, the selection is very small. I am thinking about ordering from Germany from "Thomann.de". Pretty big selection there.
#13
Edit : Posted in the wrong thread.

To be on point though, if you need a tremolo to play a style of music or a particular song then you're pretty screwed if you have a hardtail. If you need a 7 string for whatever reason then a 6 string won't do. If you need a single coil sound for a particular band then a high output humbucker is not going to be ideal.. There is plenty of room for exploring different sounds.

But sure whether it's a Les Paul or a Strat shape is pretty irrelevant, just like many other aspects.
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Last edited by Bigbazz at Mar 18, 2017,
#14
Bigbazz Thanks for the reply.

I dont like to use tremolo tbh, And I think I can manage without one.

I think I would like single coils. I am just scared that I buy one and it ends up being to weak and thin sounding. I have a very old yamaha 120sd, and It just sounds a little weak and false. especially when I add some gain.

 I have no idea about what scale lengh I want. My hands aint that big, so I think It would be nice, if the frets are not to far apart.

any suggestions on a single coiled guitar in this price range?  I have not been finding much recommended guitars on forums other than les paul style guitars tbh.
#15
Quote by Casqued
Bigbazz
I think I would like single coils. I am just scared that I buy one and it ends up being to weak and thin sounding. I have a very old yamaha 120sd, and It just sounds a little weak and false. especially when I add some gain.

They sound very different from humbuckers and they do tend to have significantly less output just by their nature. But their lower output makes them very articulate for leads and clean tones. Single coils also tend to generate lots of noise with high gain levels, so if you're playing with a lot of gain, they aren't ideal. But not all single coil sized-pickups are technically single coils. Some pickups are voiced a bit like single coils and look almost exactly like them, but are actually humbuckers. The two coils that you see on humbuckers are just stacked on top of one another, so that the humbucker comes in a single coil size, appearance and tone (somewhat), but without any of the noise that's inherent in true single coils. They tend to be called 'stacked humbuckers' and they're common in a lot of metal-styled guitars such as Ibanez's or Jacksons, since a lot of players like to play with tons of gain on those kinds of guitars and the hum that true single coils generate would become problematic in such a setup. Do your research into the specs of the guitar you're looking at to know if the guitar has them.

If you have a good amp, I wouldn't worry about it very much. A good amp will make almost any guitar sound good for something. If you don't have a good amp, then worry about getting a good amp. Then worry about the pickups.
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#16
Thomann is a good retailer to order from.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#17
Quote by Casqued
Bigbazz Thanks for the reply.

I dont like to use tremolo tbh, And I think I can manage without one.

I think I would like single coils. I am just scared that I buy one and it ends up being to weak and thin sounding. I have a very old yamaha 120sd, and It just sounds a little weak and false. especially when I add some gain.

 I have no idea about what scale lengh I want. My hands aint that big, so I think It would be nice, if the frets are not to far apart.

any suggestions on a single coiled guitar in this price range?  I have not been finding much recommended guitars on forums other than les paul style guitars tbh.


I don't think the scale length is really something you need to worry about, the Gibson scale does mean the frets are closer together but it's not really going to be an issue either way, I recently saw a 12 year old girl playing a full 25.5inch scale 7 string guitar like some monster and her hands were pretty small. To be honest I think in this case I would recommend you get something with Humbucker pickups or a mix of Humbucker + single coil (like H S H or H S S).

You need to decide if you need/want a tremolo system like the guys in your videos, do some research on playing with tremolo bar and if you think that is not required then your original option of an Epiphone Les Paul is great. Otherwise if you want the tremolo you need to look around at something like a Fender Deluxe Stratocaster, maybe look at the "Sterling by Musicman, John Petrucci" model.. Ibanez RG or S series, maybe an EVH Wolfgang. Personally I'd get a Deluxe Strat in your case but that's my taste.
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Last edited by Bigbazz at Mar 18, 2017,
#18
Quote by Tony Done
dspellman

A lot of it seems to be aesthetic - it certainly is in my case - not functional. Witness your use of Variax.



*headscratch* Huh?
#21
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
They sound very different from humbuckers and they do tend to have significantly less output just by their nature. But their lower output makes them very articulate for leads and clean tones. Single coils also tend to generate lots of noise with high gain levels, so if you're playing with a lot of gain, they aren't ideal. But not all single coil sized-pickups are technically single coils. Some pickups are voiced a bit like single coils and look almost exactly like them, but are actually humbuckers. The two coils that you see on humbuckers are just stacked on top of one another, so that the humbucker comes in a single coil size, appearance and tone (somewhat), but without any of the noise that's inherent in true single coils. They tend to be called 'stacked humbuckers' and they're common in a lot of metal-styled guitars such as Ibanez's or Jacksons, since a lot of players like to play with tons of gain on those kinds of guitars and the hum that true single coils generate would become problematic in such a setup. Do your research into the specs of the guitar you're looking at to know if the guitar has them.

If you have a good amp, I wouldn't worry about it very much. A good amp will make almost any guitar sound good for something. If you don't have a good amp, then worry about getting a good amp. Then worry about the pickups.

Okay, I appreciate the info :P

I am not sure I've got a "good" amp. I have a Roland cube 30X. I don't need a louder one, as I am mostly playing with headphones.
#22
Bigbazz Thanks. Makes me think about the les paul again. I find it very good looking. I am pretty sure I dont want a tremolo, so that makes it a little easier
#23
Quote by Tony Done
dspellman

I think you are an exception to the general rule. You are happy with a particular guitar, and don't associate with any specific genre, sound or style of instrument


The Variax just gives me access to a whole bunch of guitar sounds and tunings. The *look* of the guitar that I have is "metal/shredder," but it's not locked into that genre, thanks to all the models and alternate tuning options.  My LPs have Floyds, kill switches, sustainers and...uh..."interesting" pickups as well as some electronic things going on. They may *look* like an LP from the audience, but they may not be doing Les Paul-like things at any given time. 

What's fun to do is to punch holes in this genre business every now and then. I sit in with a P&W band every now and then, and they sometimes cringe when I pull out a black skull and crossbones or bright red pointy bass. They got all excited and thinking that I'd gone "Hillsong" when I pulled out a pure white LP (with gold hardware!), but that LP has a Floyd, a sustainer and a Super Distortion in the bridge.  Not so angelic after all. 
#24
Quote by Casqued
Bigbazz Thanks. Makes me think about the les paul again. I find it very good looking. I am pretty sure I dont want a tremolo, so that makes it a little easier


My LPs, at least, can be deceiving. I have Floyds on five (six?) of them in part because it's easier to keep them in tune. 
The weights can really vary as well. I have a Gibson Access Custom that's VERY lightweight. It's chambered *and* the body is thinner than a standard LP. And I've got an Agile AL-3100 Floyd that could have anchored the Titanic. 

You might want to check the *backside* of LP's you're looking at. There are a number of them that are much different in terms of comfort and upper fret playability. Gibson's HP series has a contoured neck heel and a tummy cut, as does Agile's AL-3200 series:

#25
dspellman 

Yeah, it's a sort of mild protest against convention. I do the same thing via a different route - getting all sorts of cheap, scruffy electrics to work well. - Eg my Oz$65 Peavey with a homemade pickguard and pickups that I like. My go-to acoustic looks like it belongs in the garbage skip, but it plays and sounds pretty good.
Last edited by Tony Done at Mar 21, 2017,
#26
One LP-style guitar I'll recommend is the Electra Omega family.
https://www.electraguitar.com/pages/guitars

You might also like similar guitars from Hagstrom.
http://www.hagstromguitars.com/electric-guitars.html
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#27
Quote by dspellman
My personal feeling is that "different guitars for specific music styles" is intensely overblown. Moreover, I think it's fueled by manufacturers who are interested in selling you (the very wide general "you") the largest number of guitars they can. The nearest thing I can think of that comes close to this is the shoe industry, particularly the sports shoe industry, which offers a shoe for every *position* in every sport. 

I think it's mostly baloney. 


Have you actually spent time using different guitars for different genres? A strat, tele, semi, and solid body with humbuckers will all sound pretty different. Notice how the second video sounds vastly different because it's a strat?

As far as trem or no trem: the hardware is expensive, which means at this price range it'll be a sacrifice. Don't make yourself think you NEED one, particularly considering it was only used in 1 song for about 4 notes.

Regarding pickups: I still suggest humbuckers for this kind of music. Nothing wrong with singlecoils, but they are a very different sound and you can tell that by that video. If you can get something with coil split or a singlecoil in the middle then awesome. More tonal possibilities outside of this.

TS: go out and try different guitars and see what you like and feels good to you.

Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#29
Quote by Tony Done
 Hmm that's a bit of a stretch, because everything else is different as well 


Not a stretch at all. Singlecoil starts in particular have very peculiar nuances in sound.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


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#30
evening_crow  Can you switch to white type? Purple is generally used to indicate sarcasm. Worse, it's very hard to read against black. 
#31
Quote by evening_crow
Have you actually spent time using different guitars for different genres? A strat, tele, semi, and solid body with humbuckers will all sound pretty different. Notice how the second video sounds vastly different because it's a strat?



I'm assuming you didn't direct this at me. 
#32
Quote by dspellman
evening_crow  Can you switch to white type? Purple is generally used to indicate sarcasm. Worse, it's very hard to read against black. 

I've been using UG black since its introduction. Not hard to read at all.

Quote by dspellman
I'm assuming you didn't direct this at me. 

Yes.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


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#33
Quote by evening_crow
Have you actually spent time using different guitars for different genres? A strat, tele, semi, and solid body with humbuckers will all sound pretty different. Notice how the second video sounds vastly different because it's a strat?



1. Yes. I've got 51...wait...52 guitars here to choose from. Latest is a 27" scale 7-string with an SD Nazgul. And four Variax guitars in the mix. Thank you for letting me know that different guitars sound different. 
2. Yes, I noticed how the second video sounds different for several different reasons, one of them related to the guitar. 

3. So here's the deal. I simply don't believe that you need to be cookie cutter in your approach to a genre, particularly when it comes to gear. "Genre" doesn't equate to "herd of mindless sheep." If there's a requirement that you use a 6505 and an Ibanez 7-string for what you're calling a genre, then you've sliced the pie far too narrowly and left no room for artistic license or independent thinking or personal feeling.  I understand the charm for beginners; the challenge to get to the "sound" of others is removed. At some point, however, "genre" becomes stereotype, monotony and conformity, and while a manufacturer will relish that and sell into that all day long, it's not something I really want to be part of. 
#34
dspellman

Agreed.

I, for one, am not going to tell John 5 he's wrong for using Teles for metal, Lonnie Mack for playing blues and C&W on flying Vs, or Mike Hampton for using JEMS, Jackson Vs, BC Riches and the like over his decades-long career in Parliament/Funkadelic.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#35
Quote by dspellman
1. Yes. I've got 51...wait...52 guitars here to choose from. Latest is a 27" scale 7-string with an SD Nazgul. And four Variax guitars in the mix. Thank you for letting me know that different guitars sound different. 
2. Yes, I noticed how the second video sounds different for several different reasons, one of them related to the guitar. 

3. So here's the deal. I simply don't believe that you need to be cookie cutter in your approach to a genre, particularly when it comes to gear. "Genre" doesn't equate to "herd of mindless sheep." If there's a requirement that you use a 6505 and an Ibanez 7-string for what you're calling a genre, then you've sliced the pie far too narrowly and left no room for artistic license or independent thinking or personal feeling.  I understand the charm for beginners; the challenge to get to the "sound" of others is removed. At some point, however, "genre" becomes stereotype, monotony and conformity, and while a manufacturer will relish that and sell into that all day long, it's not something I really want to be part of. 


I don't disagree on using unconventional guitars for different genres, but when someone wants to get a specific sound, like OP, of course there's certain key points that'll help him get there.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#36
Casque- I think you should check out Ibanez guitars. I'm not up on which series is which- there's plenty of other people who could give you better direction than me- but they usually are well-built, inexpensive (some models anyways) and lend themselves to quick playing and upper-register access. Another brand that has a good reputation and might appeal to you is Schecter. A lot of professional guitarists use their production models made in Korea, and get really good results.

I personally prefer Les Pauls, and have no interest really in either of those brands, but I also aim to play stuff dramatically different than what you're looking to get into.

The other options suggested above were good too- Sterling by Music Man and whatnot. I feel like if you got a Les Paul you might realize in time that you wanted something a little more "shreddy". But that's just my sense from what you posted.

-Goldie
#37
I think if it was me back at this stage, I would be going for a Squire Vintage they are just so durable and dependable, they feel comfortable not a tiring guitar to play, easy to repair should anything bad happens, they are just such a good all rounder guitar,  oh yea,  they sound real nice too and can easily be altered with effect pedals, processors etc.....also at the end of the day if looked after and still in nice condition when you decide to change to something else, your resale will still be pretty good for moving on......all sounds sensible to me, this is just my opnion of course, but I hope it helps.