#1
I've been practicing a little over 7 months now 2.5-3 hours a day. About 75% of that time is spent working on material from Troy Stetinas books, the rest trying to learn songs. This weekend will be the first time I'm playing with another human, a drummer who has played for almost 30 years hoping I'll learn something. I honestly have no idea what I'm going to do, I mean I can play exercises up to my level and a few songs but playing with someone I'm not sure what's going to happen. Any advice on how I can get the most from this time? He's being very cool letting a begginer like me make some noise with him.
#2
The essential thing, of course, is locking to his time ... you may find excitement or nerves make you speed up versus him.  The other thing is listeningclosely to his rhythm, and complement that (e.g he will probably set up a groove to give you something to jam against).  Most of of all, enjoy it!
#3
Quote by beaglegod
I've been practicing a little over 7 months now 2.5-3 hours a day. About 75% of that time is spent working on material from Troy Stetinas books, the rest trying to learn songs. This weekend will be the first time I'm playing with another human, a drummer who has played for almost 30 years hoping I'll learn something. I honestly have no idea what I'm going to do, I mean I can play exercises up to my level and a few songs but playing with someone I'm not sure what's going to happen. Any advice on how I can get the most from this time? He's being very cool letting a begginer like me make some noise with him.

Do you use a metronome at home? I think it will be a great experience for you if the other person has been at it 30 years, there's a wealth of experience there.
Carthago delenda est.
#4
33db
I practice all exercises and scales with a drum machine varying the tempos and beats, but still it's probably so different from the dynamics of a real person. I'm sure I'll have a good time maybe not so much the drummer.
#5
There is a learning curve for sure, playing with people is much looser ( things slightly speed up, slow down etc.).  If he has 30 years experience then you shouldn't have any issues on his end. 

The main thing you are going to want to have is riffs or songs to play - stuff that's easy to play along to.   Ideally you will be playing songs you both know. 

You should be practicing along with actual albums - learn songs from the records and play along with the band recordings.  That's how you prepare yourself - drum machines are ok for exercises, but they are robotic and devoid of musicality - start playing to real music.
#6
I think you'll have fun. I did have one friend though that it was interesting. I had played in bands pretty much my whole life and although I would play at home and obviously learned cover songs for fun, mainly I was someone who wrote original music and played with other musicians. I had a friend who only played to records at home. He got very good actually just by learning songs by ear. He could play Metallica, Rush, Led Zeppelin, really anything that we were into he got pretty good at copying with the CD (I actually loved to hear him do it because it was actually pretty good). But occasionally he and I would get together and try to play the songs in his garage (no drummer just two guitars or me playing bass instead of guitar) and he just couldn't keep time and without the CD playing underneath him and he got very lost. Was pretty strange.

You'll be fine enjoy it and listen to his time! Lock into it. And go for a ride!
Last edited by Nadda2 at Mar 17, 2017,
#7
I feel like this post is only because the nerves are kicking in. If you practice with a drum machine you'll be fine and any problems will be sorted out with consistent practice.
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#8
Well today is the day, I have this strange feeling I have no buisiness trying to play something with this drummer. I probably need a good 10 months more of woodshedding before I can contribute but if I come away having learned more than I know now I guess thats,a pretty good deal.
I'll let ya know how,it go's. ....................maybe.
#9
Quote by beaglegod
Well today is the day, I have this strange feeling I have no buisiness trying to play something with this drummer. I probably need a good 10 months more of woodshedding before I can contribute but if I come away having learned more than I know now I guess thats,a pretty good deal.
I'll let ya know how,it go's. ....................maybe.

Of course you "have business" jamming with him, it's how you get better.
Always try to go above your level with other players, so long as they know you're new to it, you learn more, you learn faster, if you play with people you think are at your level you don't really get as much from it.

If the guys a dick about it just tell him you prefer your drum machine because it keeps better time
Carthago delenda est.
#10
He wouldn't be playing with you if he wasn't interested in collaborating. He knows your skill level (I'd guess) so he can't expect a seasoned professionals or like experience with some who's played for years.
#11
I have played for over 48 years now and can tell you almost near certainty that you are over thinking all of this. Just go have fun, make mistakes and learn from it, and then thank your friend for taking the time to jam with you.
#12
Quote by tjfrench
I have played for over 48 years now and can tell you almost near certainty that you are over thinking all of this. Just go have fun, make mistakes and learn from it, and then thank your friend for taking the time to jam with you.

I agree, I have noticed that people that show concerns/worries over performance, and the other people involved tend to be more successful.
There's a plus to everything if you look hard enough.
Carthago delenda est.
#14
Short Answer : Always depend on his beat.

They say guitarists don't listen to singers, because they already found someone more friendly for
their harmony.
#17
Well it was a lot of fun, we didn't mess around a long time maybe an hour, talked a lot got some pizza. I played some simple riffs based on what I've learned from Stetinas books, I also played most of White Heat Red Hot by Judas Priest. Mostly I tried to stay in the pocket which I think I'll get better at with time, confidence, and less thinking.
I can tell though this can really get to be so much fun.
Can't wait to get back hopefully with a bass player as well.