#1
like XXXX11 or XXXX22 and so on. whatever those chords are called. this might seem a bit of a strange question. 
maybe ones where one of the strings is open too.
if only a full chart existed that i could find in a book somewhere. that showed the availability up to the 20th fret. 
thanks
begginer geetarest.
#2
That wouldn`t be a chord you need at least 3 notes to make it a chord,Your example XXXX11 that would work with F or Fm `cause the root and fifth are there,Basically an easy way is what chords you do know use those high notes to work with that chord(this is just an easy way!)Example:
   Fm   Bb
E:1~~/:6~~/:
B:1~~/:6~~/:
G:X~~/:X~~/:
D:X~~/:X~~/:
A:X~~/:X~~/:
E:X~~/:X~~/:
Vibrato on the Fm then slide to it`s relative major Bb,Try it out on the chords you know.Someone will have a better way of explaining it but there`s a start.
#3
Take any chord you like, open or barred, doesn't matter....and just play the top 2 notes. Voila.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
like XXXX11 or XXXX22 and so on. whatever those chords are called. this might seem a bit of a strange question. 
maybe ones where one of the strings is open too.
if only a full chart existed that i could find in a book somewhere. that showed the availability up to the 20th fret. 
thanks

Those are F5 & F#5, technically not chords, but intervals. It's a higher version of the low 'power chords' you're probably familiar with, but inverted. You can move that shape as high up as you want, e.g. xxxx55 = A5, xxxx88 = C5, xxxx12 12 = E5
Also you can use this shape xxxx24 = C#5, xxxx57 = E5, xxxx10 12 = A5 etc, that's the same shape as a regular power chord with the root on the B string and the 5th on the e string.
More intervals: minor 3rds - xxxx42, xxxx75 , xxxx10 8, etc
major 3rds - xxxx43, xxxx76, xxxx10 9, etc
Take any of those shapes and add another note on the G string and you'll get 'proper' three note chords.

Using open strings; you won't get chords but you can get a nice droning effect if you keep playing either the B or e string open along with a melody note on the other string.
e.g.
2-4-5---4-2-0-2-4-2----
0-0-0---0-0-0-0-0-0----
-----------------------
-----------------------
-----------------------
-----------------------

0-0-0-----0---0-0-----
5-8-10----10--1012----
----------------------
----------------------
----------------------
----------------------
#5
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
like XXXX11 or XXXX22 and so on. whatever those chords are called. this might seem a bit of a strange question. 
maybe ones where one of the strings is open too.
if only a full chart existed that i could find in a book somewhere. that showed the availability up to the 20th fret. 
thanks

It is a strange question for a couple reasons.

As has been mentioned, these aren't chords so they don't have "chord names", so a chart of them could only show them.

Why haven't you just worked this out yourself?

The ones that use an open string are simple... leave the B string open and fret the E string from the 1st fret to the 20th, playing both strings each time. Then leave the E string open and fret the B string up the neck. That's all there is to exploring the open string variations.

For the ones where both strings are fretted it is even easier because your hand can only span so much fret distance, so the combinations are limited, and since the whole set of combinations transposes up and down the neck you get all combinations from just one position. In fact you get duplicate fingerings for most of them.

If you can span five frets then that's five on each string. That means 5^2 so 25 different ways. Number the frets 1-5  where the first number is the B string and the second is the E string and look at all the combinations, like this...

11 12 13 14 15
21 22 23 24 25
31 32 33 34 35
41 42 43 44 45
51 52 53 54 55

Notice that the doubles (11, 22, 33, 44, 55) are the same thing with different fingerings, just transposed.
Now notice that all of the parallel diagonals (12, 23, 34, 45) are, too.
If you remove all the multi-fingering duplicates of transposition you get this...

11 12 13 14 15
21
31    
41 
51

so 11 12 13 14 15 21 31 41 51 are all the possible unique transposition invariant shapes.

No what you really want to know is how to use them. That comes from harmonization. Here is an example...

Listen to what happens at 0:55 and 1:55. He is playing two of the shapes (the most commonly used ones) to harmonize down the neck.

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Last edited by PlusPaul at Mar 17, 2017,
#6
 I'd recommend getting a book. I have the Mel Bay encyclopedia of chords. It lists many variations of chords from the high e to the low e, and inside chords, where the two e strings are muted. 
#7
One other thing you might want to try so that you can play 'chords' on the top 2 strings is just to play arpeggios of various triads, like major, minor etc.
#9
gweddle.nz 

Yes and no.
Yes I can create a chord anywhere with a root third fifth, or add a seventh etc. 
But, it's faster to find odd chords in a book or online with the tools like the variations of chord voicings provided on the tabs. 
#10
bar2271 But if you know where every interval is then why do you need a book? And also, by figuring it out yourself you strengthen your knowledge. It could be useful to double check you got it right I suppose. But once you understand chord construction I think it's a good idea to figure it out yourself.
#11
The fastest way to create chords is to learn to hear them, to hear the chord type, especially within a progression context; then you can make any chord you can hear whenever you need it, including inversion, voicing, rootless, etc...

The fastest way to learn how to do that is figure it out each time, and it does take time, but as your ears learn this they get fast, eventually split second fast...
Quote by reverb66
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#12
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
like XXXX11 or XXXX22 and so on. whatever those chords are called. this might seem a bit of a strange question. 
maybe ones where one of the strings is open too.
if only a full chart existed that i could find in a book somewhere. that showed the availability up to the 20th fret. 
thanks

Lloyd ... you may be interested in https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1730078  ... much more than charts!  Choose a chord (or create one) on a "guitar neck", and drag it around on "neck" using mouse, or see all its inversions etc. (Even see it different instruments, such as an exact guitar voicing on piano, with one keyboard command)
#13
using just the B and high E string-depending on context- you can "imply" almost any chord or partial...in using third intervals you can outline any major or minor scale (as in PlusPaul example vid)..or any interval within a scale--or notes within a chord..in the OP question the notes CF (11) could imply F minor..

or an implied chord run al la Hendrix....

7th fret F# B - B min
5th fret E A - A7
3rd fret D G - G maj
2 and 3 fret D F# - D maj

in jazz/fusion this kind of stuff is used a lot in improvisation..in many chord progressions moving any voice in the chord may imply a different chord not just an alteration to the original chord...example Bmi7 B D F# A moving the A note to G# may make it an E9 or an Abmi7b5 or a Bb7b9#5...

a study of diatonic harmony and the chords produced within the major and minor scale will expand you musical world immensely
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Mar 22, 2017,
#14
MistyMorning yes. i been hearing that that chords are 3 notes or more. i just call it that anyway, just for now. thanks for all the info you listed. 
begginer geetarest.
#15
PlusPaul well, one thing i don't want to do is play something that is wrong, but sounds good to me. like if i play 

2
5
x
x
x
x

for now i just want to start off with standard normal procedures with playing, before i get experimental. some music i listen to might be messing with my ear with that, like hardcore punk and metal bands and industrial rock bands that i get used too. 
begginer geetarest.
#16
I don't know what you mean by "standard normal procedures with playing"...

Focus on context. Those two notes don't have "a sound"... they have all kinds of potential sounds depending on the context within which they appear.
For example, all the following chords contain those two pitches...

A6

Bbdim7addb13

Bsus4

Cmaj7b5

Db(7#9sus4)

Dadd9

Esus2

Fmajb9

Gb(7)

Gmaj#11add6
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#17
i'm wondering: if two notes fretted at the same time is not a chord. then what is it? 
begginer geetarest.
#18
 Well, there are 'power chords' that consists of two or three notes, but they are not really chords, but intervals. Usually root/fifth or root fifth octave. That may be a good place for you to start in the understanding of chord construction. Start with the low E string. First fret. That is F. Now add the note of the A string third fret. That is C. So you have F C which is an F5 power chord. If you start this on the third fret that's a G5 power chord.  In reality they're root fifth intervals, but for some reason it's become common to call them chords. You can follow this pattern on the A string as well. Second fret would be B5 third fret C5 etc. These are used often in metal music.
#19
Lloyd_rogers

İt's called a diad. 2 notes
A triad is your typical chord. 3 notes.

Pluspauls comment is excellent and totally relevant. İt's not necessarily THE starting point, but this line of thinking is a good pivot point to going beyond your basic "this fret makes this note" and actually making some music.

Pick some notes, find chords those notes are in, find the next note you want to go to, build a chord around that note, repeat ad nauseum and then you'll be making beautiful music!
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#20
People, 2 notes played at the same time is not called an interval. İt's a diad. İntervals live between the notes, they are not the result of a combination of notes played simultaneously.

For instance
4
5
X
X
X
X

This is an Emajor diad.
The interval (only 1) is a major 3rd.

4
5
4
X
X
X
This is an E major triad. (2nd inversion)
The intervals (2) present are a perfect 4th (between the bottom 2 notes) and a major 3rd (between the top two notes.
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#21
It's all about context. It has to do with what the other instruments are playing at the same time. What comes before and after your "chord" also matters. You can name a triad out of context, but giving a chord name to a dyad out of context doesn't make sense. Just call it a major second or whatever the interval between the two notes is.

Remember that a chord is the combination of the notes that are played at the same time. This means, you can't only look at the guitar part. You need to take all instruments into account.

Also, sometimes you only have one or two parts in a song so you can't just look at the notes being played at the same time. You also need to look at what came before your "chord" and where it is going. What is the function of the notes? You could have a single note melody and still have clear harmonic functions in it. So even a single note line can have chords in it. You need to look at the music both vertically and horizontally.

All of this will make a lot more sense if you learn some basic theory and just play music and use your ears.
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