#1
Hey guys how ya doing today?
I've been getting serious about my building as of late and am looking at a solution to my thicknessing problems. I'm looking for something that can clean up glue ups on a bookmatched top or to level out bodies, neck blanks and fretboards etc. Since I'll hopefully be using a lot of figured woods, like flamed maple, and small pieces like those for a fretboard I'm leaning against a planer.

I found a Grizzly Drum Sander on craiglist for only $400. It's a G1079 with a 16" bed, but since I'm only doing electrics at the moment I think It will be the perfect size.
The only reviews I've seen complain about a fixed feed rate. Dust collection is to be expected with any machine of this caliber, plus I've already got that covered.
I'm in northwestern Ohio if that helps at all. There's a woodcraft about an hour away that has powermatic stuff as well as jet. I could get a new jet 10-20 and be good but I'd like to find something used and save some money as this type of stuff usually holds its value fairly well
Any help would be apprectiated.
Question Everything
Gear
PRS SE 245
Schecter Solo Special
B-52 AT-100
Orange CR60
Fulltone GT-500
Morley Bad Horsie 2
Banshee Talkbox
#2
grizzly drum sanders are a reasonably good budget drum sander.  Keep in mind that your sander needs to be a couple inches wider than the lumber you send through it.
Not taking any online orders.
#3
If you're talking flamed figured tops and whatnot you're most likely going to want to be able to variate the feed rate. Your best bet is to use a card scraper for the final finish rather than sanding, if you get experienced enough with it the results are far superior to any sander, if you're planning on doing larger scale production though you'd likely not want to spend time doing that.
You'd probably be amazed at the kind of finish a sharp set of planer blades can get you, especially the helical carbide tipped heads. Back in college I was hesitant to sand a lot of stuff because of how cleanly it came out of the helical carbide head planer. 
..I was watching my death.
#4
Thanks for the input guys.
timbit2006 I'm kind of biased against a planer at this point. I'm not into large scale production by any means. Only turning out 1 guitar by myself every few months if I'm lucky. Yes I am talking about flamed/quilted tops etc and with the short pieces my local lumberyard has I'm worried about sniping the ends too bad.
Question Everything
Gear
PRS SE 245
Schecter Solo Special
B-52 AT-100
Orange CR60
Fulltone GT-500
Morley Bad Horsie 2
Banshee Talkbox
#5
I admit that I might be mistaken, but it seems like WildMiles and timbit are talking about different things.  One seems to be talking about large equipment while the is speaking of hand tools.

Never send a figured piece of wood through a thickness planer!!!
Not taking any online orders.