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#1
I am saving up money to buy a strat, and I went to a music store to decide strat or tele. I played clean, overdriven, and Matallica style distortion, and the strat sounded great for Matallica! I know they're not the only metal band out there, but they are kindof the icons of thrash. When I added the whammy bar, it instantly made me want to play Eruption (which I played like 10 times afterward . On positions 2 & 4, it gets practically no hum, and sounds really good for distortion. Why do some people say it "can't do metal?"
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#2
Why ?

They heard and read it in the www...........
so it must be true
#3
As a big fan of Fender instruments in general, there are a couple of relatively significant things that I can think of off the top of my head.

First, singlecoils. In an ideal environment, noise is not an issue, but lots of things (fluorescent bulbs, digital devices, etc.) can set them off picking up lots of unwanted noise. At the same time, their output (especially vintage-style ones, as are on many Strats) is substantially lower than most humbuckers', meaning they need a more gain to get the same levels of saturation. Generally lesser mids also mean they generally sound less hefty, which is fine - potentially even good - for some sounds, but when riffing in a band is an issue. I haven't used very many humbuckers at all recently, but I also understand that they tend to be more compressed; however I don't know if that's a) true b) inherent to the pickup or a consequence of its output or c) relevant once you stick distortion on it.

The other thing is the fretboard radius. With the more curved Fender fretboards you can't get the action quite so low as with a flatter board if you want to be able to bend without it choking out (particularly true of the vintage radius of 7.25"). For the most part that's alright, but really fast metal stuff sometimes calls for the almost-instant response of very low action.

The big neck joint can be an obstruction for those who like to play right up the top end of the fretboard.

Generally, my experience is that Strats do not have as much (unamplified) sustain as Gibson-style instruments; however, my experience with the latter is relatively limited and there could be lots of other things going on there I'm not aware of.

None of these things make the Strat bad at metal, and there are Strats to which none of these things apply. They are just various things that put your basic, common-or-garden Strat pretty far down the list of your average metal player's instrument choices. Evidently it has advantages, too, or people like Yngwie Malmsteen or Thobbe Englund wouldn't use pretty much stock Strats, and far, far more use "metal" guitars that are based on the Strat design.

Also, Teles are cooler
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Mar 20, 2017,
#4
Okay. That makes sense. I'm used to a strat style guitar (my current one is an off brand strat with a single humbucker), so the shape feels comfortable to me, but I guess it makes sense that not everyone is like that. I personally never thought of rhe gain thing as an issue to to how massively high gain modern amps get, but maybe to some it is a problem.

Also, it was really close between the strat and tele. It came down to the hum canceling positions 2 & 4 on the strat. Teles are great, and I might get one later, too.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#5
K33nbl4d3 covered almost everything I was going to say about this.

There are some things strats excel at more than metal, for sure, and there are guitars that general excel at metal more than strats because they are designed specifically to excel at that particular genre, but really - whatever instrument works for you is the right thing to use for whatever you're trying to accomplish musically, regardless of what anyone else says or thinks about it. 

I'm not really a metal guitarist but... for heavy, chugging rhythm sounds, my tele is my go-to guitar - just backing off the tone until the 'twang' goes away gives it a nice thick but articulate thumping attack that's got more punch than I can manage to get from any other guitar. Strange but true. Normally you'd think a guitar with the fattest sounding pickups you can find would be the best choice, but in my experience that can easily translate to a kinda loose and flabby low end when combined with heavy distortion sometimes, which is generally the opposite of what you want for fast paced, chugging riffage!
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#7
Quote by AcousticMirror
Because they only have 6 strings?


That's the best answer I have ever seen. What is even the point of the entire 9 string downtune thing? It just sounds like a bass with flabby strings.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#8
Strats are able to do metal but as K33nbl4d3 said neck radius can be an issue as well a pickup noise, IMO a strat can but maybe isn't the ideal guitar for it. The single coil pickups can be an issue but the tremolo will be more often if you plan to do some of the tremolo acrobatics that are common in a lot of metal genres for that a locking system would be optimum. If I was going to buy a Strat with the intent of using it to play metal I'd get an HSS becaue there will be times when a humbucker will be the best option.

Edit: really comes down to preference I have often seen players buy Strats for playing metal only to end up swapping out the singles for single sized humbuckers which IMO really defeats the purpose of having a Strat and also falls short because single space humbuckers do not sound quite the same as full sized ones.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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Last edited by Evilnine at Mar 20, 2017,
#9
Is prog even metal anymore?



only one of these guitars is even distorted.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#10
Quote by AcousticMirror
Is prog even metal anymore?



only one of these guitars is even distorted.


I know. I listen to the older stuff up to thrash. People don't consider black metal a style of blues, but people consider modern metal a style of metal. It's so weird.

Also, you responded literally two minutes after I posted. Respect.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#11
Cause black metal isn't blues at all and modern metal is still metal.
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#12
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Cause black metal isn't blues at all and modern metal is still metal.


What I'm saying is thay you can trace them back, but it sounds nothing alike.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#13
Quote by Blompcube
I'm not really a metal guitarist but... for heavy, chugging rhythm sounds, my tele is my go-to guitar - just backing off the tone until the 'twang' goes away gives it a nice thick but articulate thumping attack that's got more punch than I can manage to get from any other guitar. Strange but true. Normally you'd think a guitar with the fattest sounding pickups you can find would be the best choice, but in my experience that can easily translate to a kinda loose and flabby low end when combined with heavy distortion sometimes, which is generally the opposite of what you want for fast paced, chugging riffage!
Yeah, same reason that people rarely play chugga-chuggas on the pickup Gibson labelled as "rhythm", and indeed why some of the guitar heroes of that awful, graceless time we call the 80s would forego neck pickups altogether.

Quote by Evilnine
If I was going to buy a Strat with the intent of using it to play metal I'd get an HSS becaue there will be times when a humbucker will be the best option.
Definitely. I'm generally an advocate of singlecoils in a lot of what-to-buy discussions because I think they get disregarded a lot as soon as somebody mentions they might want to play something heavier than AC/DC, but when buying a guitar to play metal the overwhelming majority of players will be best off with at least one humbucker.
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#14
Quote by gogiregion
What I'm saying is thay you can trace them back, but it sounds nothing alike.

Except for there is a pretty clear connection to modern metal and 'classic metal' and the only connection blues and black metal have is they both start with B.
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#15
It really depends on which strats you're talking about. If you're talking about a vintage-spec strat with low output single coils, small fretboard radius and frets, and 21 frets, then there are a lot of things which make it, if not totally useless for metal, at least much less suitable for it than other styles of guitar.

if you're talking about a modern-spec strat, maybe even an HSS or HH one, then very little. A lot of players really love superstrats (me included) for heavier tones.

We need to watch we're not arguing at cross purposes

Quote by K33nbl4d3
and indeed why some of the guitar heroes of that awful, graceless time we call the 80s would forego neck pickups altogether.


ಠ_ಠ
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
#16
A vintage Strat isn't good for metal. The pickups are noisy and low output which isn't helped by the high gain, the tremolo system doesn't have the tuning stability for the abuse you may be about to deal to it, and the 21 frets may not be enough to rip out your face melters. That said it depends on the kind of metal you're playing, but Super Strats (modified with humbuckers and locking trems) are extremely popular in all types of Metal.

A buddy of mine played a Suhr Classic T (Telecaster) and before that a USA Fender Tele in a metal band, single coils and all... His sound was really great live (he ran a Peavey 6505+ and a Cornford Roadhouse), so it can actually be done, but it depends on what kinda metal you're playing, there are thousands of variants of Metal. If you're talking about drop tuned extremely compressed high gain stuff like Periphery, Meshuggah, Gojira etc then the rhythm playing probably isn't going to sound great on low-medium output single coils... But then if you're doing that you probably want a 7-8 string anyway.
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#17
They are misinformed, they even make a few high output singles coil sized humbuckers now. Unless you're playing some super shreddy lead stuff you need 24 frets for. But for most metal a strat can handle it with the right pickups, amp.
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Squier Classic Vibs 70's Precision
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#18
People say strats suck for metal, because tone comes from the skill. And they are jealous.
#19
Quote by ArturPr
People say strats suck for metal, because tone comes from the skill. And they are jealous.


Maybe to a certain extent. Metal is difficult in its own right.
Ibanez VBT700
Schecter Traditional Custom (Black Winter)
Orange Micro Dark
Line 6 Flextone 112
Big Muff
MXR Micro Amp


Squier Classic Vibs 70's Precision
Ampeg BA110V2
#20
romeozdistress I think metal's heaviness doesn't come from the tone, but from the drive and feel, which is a combination of good drums, bass, and guitar compositions. I think Malmsteen is a decent example.

Also, single coil pickups have a cool vocal-like quality which I really like, and I think it sounds great in metal. Just my opinion though.
#21
yeah and a lot of that drive and feel comes from overdriven instruments.


It's not as heavy through a twin and a tele. You can do it, you might be able to make it work but to say the gear doesn't matter is pretty far and I don't agree at all.


This is coming from a "tone is in the fingers" guy too.
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#22
Metal is generally high gain, single coils are noisy.
But in the end it's BS, because with todays software driven emulation any guitar can do metal.
#23
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
It's not as heavy through a twin and a tele. You can do it, you might be able to make it work but to say the gear doesn't matter is pretty far and I don't agree at all.
That right there was my rig until I got the AmpliFire so I can confirm
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Youre officially uber shit now.

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#25
Considering my Carvin Legacy and series of dirt boxes, I reckon I could make anything do metal. Buy what makes you happy.
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#27
Quote by nelesev
Jim Root doesn't agree


Staying in line with the original post, it actually kinda points to Jim Root agreeing, since you just linked a video where Jim demonstrates his guitar where he has replaced all of the core foundations of a standard Strat, other than the body shape which is irrelevant to begin with.
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Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#28
Quote by diabolical
The other guy in my band has this one:

It is fairly standard Strat with single coiled sized humbuckers. It seems to handle things well. He also plays a Charvel which is a humbucker loaded Strat.


People that buy strats like that should be permanently sterilized.
#29
Quote by Bigbazz
Staying in line with the original post, it actually kinda points to Jim Root agreeing, since you just linked a video where Jim demonstrates his guitar where he has replaced all of the core foundations of a standard Strat, other than the body shape which is irrelevant to begin with.

What do you expect of shitty stock fenders? Cannibal Corpse?
#30
Quote by nelesev
What do you expect of shitty stock fenders? Cannibal Corpse?


I feel you have missed the context of the discussion/post, so I have nothing to say to this.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#31
i use strats with single coils and i do play metal with them. vintage style singles can be pretty noisy but there are other types of single coil pups that aren't as noisy that do work. the biggest problem is that instead of embracing the strat sound in a metal context players just want them to sound like a humbucker equiped guitar. strats behave differently with higher gain which can be very useful for metal just not the same as what many are used to. as far as chugging goes a strat really does't make that easy from a design standpoint. 

in the 70s - early 80s there were plenty of strats doing metal (and no i don't want to get in to that debate back then it was metal) however the more moden stuff clearly isn't meant to be played on a SSS strat and i don't recommend trying as it will cause a lot of frustration. while it is often said that any guitar can play any style that doesn't mean you should or a particular guitar is best suited for the job. 
#32
Quote by 33db
People that buy strats like that should be permanently sterilized.



Never been much fan of the Strat but it is one of those things that you can have more than one pickguard and even swap them as the gig requires, so with several moves that Iron Maiden strat could become a blues strat or whatever. It is all about schlocking guitar sales. The strat mods worked for Iron Maiden who make over $100,000 per concert, so who's to say it is wrong?
#33
Can't say it's wrong except that it's wrong for me, the hardest I ever got was Judas Priest which is tame compared to metal today.
#34
Quote by nelesev
What do you expect of shitty stock fenders? Cannibal Corpse?

stock Fenders are hardly "shitty". Cannibal Corpse on the other hand ........
#36
Quote by AcousticMirror
Is prog even metal anymore?



only one of these guitars is even distorted.


I think they all are (to a degree). But prog is one of those genres that sounds the same if you cut it anywhere and loop it. No sense of the piece going anywhere, developing tension, resolving that tension that they didn't develop. It's like going to a massage parlor and having cats run all over your body. 
#37
Quote by dspellman
I think they all are (to a degree). But prog is one of those genres that sounds the same if you cut it anywhere and loop it. No sense of the piece going anywhere, developing tension, resolving that tension that they didn't develop. It's like going to a massage parlor and having cats run all over your body. 


ya it's great. cats are great.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#38
Quote by monwobobbo
i use strats with single coils and i do play metal with them. vintage style singles can be pretty noisy but there are other types of single coil pups that aren't as noisy that do work. the biggest problem is that instead of embracing the strat sound in a metal context players just want them to sound like a humbucker equiped guitar. strats behave differently with higher gain which can be very useful for metal just not the same as what many are used to. as far as chugging goes a strat really does't make that easy from a design standpoint. 

in the 70s - early 80s there were plenty of strats doing metal (and no i don't want to get in to that debate back then it was metal) however the more moden stuff clearly isn't meant to be played on a SSS strat and i don't recommend trying as it will cause a lot of frustration. while it is often said that any guitar can play any style that doesn't mean you should or a particular guitar is best suited for the job. 


For newer stiles, I'd agree that a single coil strat won't cut it; with older styles, it sounds great! It didn't have very much hum, while also being practiclly silent in 2 & 4. It sounded way better for metal than my current humbucker guitar (that's not saying too much, though). Personally, I'm not abig fan of modern metal, and so I wouldn't really know how good strats are at it, but it handled gain really well, and I didn't have to muddy the amp (turn up bass and down trebble) to get it to sound good.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#39
a lot of people are talking about why strats aren't that bad,
but I also feel like certain guitar brands just have a stronger presence  in the market than stratocasters, specifically for metal.
So it is not that they are bad for metal(like literally everyone in this thread had said), but there are so many other options for a metal guitarist that make stratocasters less appealing to new and old metal players.

in the mind of a beginning metal guitarist- "why would I buy an expensive strat with only single-coils when I can buy like an Ibanez RG that has everything?"
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#40
If you handed me a Strat with a humbucker in the bridge I could play straight death metal no problem.  For me, the only thing wrong for metal with most Strats is the single coil bridge pickup.  It isn't even so much an output thing, they just don't sound thick enough for heavy, chugging rhythms -- at least I've never heard/played one that did.  I actually really like the tones I can get out of the middle and neck single coils though.  And for me, Strats feel damned comfortable -- however, I'm not really much of a shredder.  But fast scales, legato, and reasonable vibrato and bends I've not had any issues with.

Damn... I need to get a Strat again... 
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
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Pestilential Flood
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