Poll: Favorite painters
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View poll results: Favorite painters
Raphael
3 8%
Michelangelo
3 8%
Da Vinci
5 14%
Botticelli
4 11%
El Greco
3 8%
Caravaggio
3 8%
Bosch
4 11%
Durer
3 8%
Rembrandt
2 6%
William Blake
4 11%
Goya
4 11%
Delacroix
3 8%
Magritte
3 8%
Renoir
2 6%
Cezanne
2 6%
Degas
2 6%
Monet
3 8%
Manet
2 6%
Dali
4 11%
Henri Rousseau
2 6%
Kahlo
2 6%
Miro
3 8%
Picasso
5 14%
Munch
2 6%
Pollock
3 8%
Warhol
2 6%
Bob Ross
14 39%
Banksy
2 6%
Other
16 44%
Voters: 36.
Page 2 of 3
#41
Quote by Banjocal
"the perfect line".

What does that mean? Perspective?

His art reminds me of graphic novels I read when I was younger.
#42
Quote by ultimate-slash
Can't pick a favourite painter (or a favourite style even), as I've seen so much that blew me away.

Just to single someone out, I as blown away by Aelbert Cuyp's work when I visited the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam last December.
He's known for his landscapes, and the way he uses light is just phenomenal.


This scene reminds me a lot of JMW Turner, who painted a lot of ocean/ship/port scenes, but less impressionist.

Both have impressive use of light and space
But we little know until tried how much of the uncontrollable there is in us, urging across glaciers and torrents, and up dangerous heights, let the judgment forbid as it may.
#43
Quote by 33db
What does that mean? Perspective?

His art reminds me of graphic novels I read when I was younger.
I believe he meant that the shakiness, use of thickness and kinks used to emphasise bodily features had a quality to it unlike other artists.

I tend to see a lot of anxiety in the foundational lines he made but that might be projecting
Ranch It Up ///////// 'Sup Mello?
#44
Quote by Banjocal
I believe he meant that the shakiness, use of thickness and kinks used to emphasise bodily features had a quality to it unlike other artists.

I tend to see a lot of anxiety in the foundational lines he made but that might be projecting

I see it too, but it also conjures up images of labor camps and prisoners just north of skin and bones.
#45
anyway who cares about some fag portraitist when we can admire this excellent work

Ranch It Up ///////// 'Sup Mello?
#46
^Yeah that sort of art is used for the specific purpose of moving large amounts of cash, laundering it, and keeping it "legit".
#47
to be fair its more considered varieties can be interesting. some of Richard Serra's Out of Round series are terrifying. Like staring into a gaping void.

edit: another excellent "super arty" one is Anselm Kiefer, who uses shellac and coal in his paintings and makes books out of giant sheets of lead. Had the privilege of seeing his work in Germany (he makes a lot of work about the war) and


Ranch It Up ///////// 'Sup Mello?
Last edited by Banjocal at Mar 20, 2017,
#48
Quote by 33db
^Yeah that sort of art is used for the specific purpose of moving large amounts of cash, laundering it, and keeping it "legit".


You just don't "get" it, maaaaan
But we little know until tried how much of the uncontrollable there is in us, urging across glaciers and torrents, and up dangerous heights, let the judgment forbid as it may.
#49
Quote by Dreadnought
You just don't "get" it, maaaaan

There's some truth in that, I know what I like but I couldn't tell you why I like it... or why I don't.
#50
Quote by Banjocal
My photography tutor described Schiele as the painter with "the perfect line".

idk what you can do with that info but I more or less agree.

Yeah, he's similar to Al Hirschfeld in that regard. Although their approaches differ in terms of perspective—Schiele was more Freudian and Al usually depicted pop culture—their understanding of emphasis and focus is pretty amazing. It's actually what drives my own understanding of storytelling and cinematography.


I'm not an art buff by any means, but those two were fairly formative to me in a meta-art sense where I could derive an understanding of how constructs work. It's important that they stripped away so many features of painting in their process too.
She was born in 1898 in a barn. She died on the thirty-seventh floor of a skyscraper. She's an astronaut.
#51
Quote by slapsymcdougal
 Hitler... there was a painter! He could paint an entire apartment in ONE afternoon! TWO coats! 


Imagine how silly the admissions guy that rejected Hitler from art school must have felt. Like, dude... you're practically responsible for the Holocaust. Stalin was also a painter. His specialty was naked men.
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.
#52
Quote by 33db
^Yeah that sort of art is used for the specific purpose of moving large amounts of cash, laundering it, and keeping it "legit".

you remind me of people who don't like 2001
#53
Quote by Diamond Dave
you remind me of people who don't like 2001

Is that some sort of conflation between the black obelisk looking painting and my avatar?
Explain yourself man before I whack you in the head with a bone.
#54
Quote by 33db
Is that some sort of conflation between the black obelisk looking painting and my avatar?
Explain yourself man before I whack you in the head with a bone.

from one star IMDB reviews:

"This is certainly one of the most boring and meaningless films I have ever seen in my life."

"I honestly have no idea what the critics and fans see in this movie. And that's not because I can't appreciate "art". I love a good film with profound messages, brilliant cinematography, and great directing."

"This is not me 'not getting it.' This is me being bored to tears by long stretches of absolutely nothing."
Last edited by Diamond Dave at Mar 20, 2017,
#55
Quote by 33db
^Yeah that sort of art is used for the specific purpose of moving large amounts of cash, laundering it, and keeping it "legit".


Truth. At least it's not creepy though
.
#56
I like Dali. There's a museum of his I still need to visit, but his version of las meninas is pretty good






And I unironically stared at the lolwat painting for a long time once, so whoever did this one too. It's got layers

.
Last edited by Fat Lard at Mar 20, 2017,
#57
This meninas is pretty dope too now that I remember. Making the artist huge and the light from the windows/person is interesting. And the guy at the staircase facing away instead of facing is a nice touch. Not as good as Dali's though IMO, but some interesting stuff going on. Like those hooks on the ceiling wtf lol




.
Last edited by Fat Lard at Mar 20, 2017,
#58
I like Monet, Dali, and Pollock. My list isn't restricted to those, but those are a few  favorites I can list on the top of my head.
The people who bash Pollock are usually the ones who just bash avant-garde in general but in person these paintings are enormous and magnificent. It's much different from just googling 'pollock paintings'.

Monet; Waterlilies




Dali; The Temptation




Pollock; mural, 1943

"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#59
Quote by hecks
I like Monet, Dali, and Pollock. My list isn't restricted to those, but those are a few  favorites I can list on the top of my head.
The people who bash Pollock are usually the ones who just bash avant-garde in general but in person these paintings are enormous and magnificent. It's much different from just googling 'pollock paintings'.

that applies to all art I've seen in person, really eye-opening.

really dig the Monet and Pollock you've posted too, one of the most abstract works I've seen from Monet and one of the least from Pollock lol. They're right in the sweet spot for me.
#60
Quote by Diamond Dave
that applies to all art I've seen in person, really eye-opening.

really dig the Monet and Pollock you've posted too, one of the most abstract works I've seen from Monet and one of the least from Pollock lol. They're right in the sweet spot for me.

Hahaha yeah, it's the reason why I can't ever buy reprints; it's just not as good as the real thing. 
I never realized the importance of texture until I saw a couple of paintings in person. 

You really come to appreciate things like this
"ba doo doo ba doo doo ba doo daa"
- earth,wind, and fire
#61
There's an unbearable stillness to Las Meninas.

One more: One-Corner Ma

Ranch It Up ///////// 'Sup Mello?
#62
I'm a big fan of Casper David Freidrichs stuff. He paints these gorgeous landscapes that make you just wanna walk into them. He died mostly unappreciated in the early 1800's but he was later regarded as a fundamental cornerstone of German romanticism. 

Heironymous Bosch and Peter Brueghal the Elder painted some really cool, gruesome stuff particularly Bosch's depictions of Hell and Brueghal's The Triumph of Death. 

My favourite stuff is the pre-raphaelite art by people like Millais and William Holman Hunt. It's all just beautifully painted nostalgia for a romantic Medieval period basically but I love it. 
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#63
Quote by Banjocal
There's an unbearable stillness to Las Meninas.

One more: One-Corner Ma



Diggin this
But we little know until tried how much of the uncontrollable there is in us, urging across glaciers and torrents, and up dangerous heights, let the judgment forbid as it may.
#66
Quote by geo-rage
Frank Frazetta

came to post this. frank was the man when it comes to painting. also like Ken Kelly (he did the cover to Rainbow's Rising album) and Boris Vellajo (similar style to Frazetta) 
#68
There's not much of Schiele's I could share here because of the nudity contained in the paintings, but I feel compelled to sort of because everyone else is doing their parts.

First here's a self-portrait he did in 1914. His self-portraits tend to follow this theme for the most part. Very thick lines, jagged features, which don't exactly accentuate figurative flaws but make them the dang thesis.



The second I want to pose in contrast to the previous one. For context, this is his wife, which he (maybe apocryphally) wasn't in love with but married in search of status. He doesn't frame her that differently from any other of his figures, but the significant difference is the abundance of clothes. For real, she straight up looks like she's wearing a parachute here, but most of his other paintings depict people undressed to various extents. There's no boldness to the lines and no distortion to her face at all. It's very discomforting to me because what he loved to depict was this sort of animalistic pursuit of sex. There's no sense of exposure here. She's perfectly hidden from view, chaste, powdered and so on.



The last one which I wanna pose in the context of the previous two depicts (clothed) sex. It's somewhat of a return to normalcy for him (with color here) and I'll let this one speak for itself.



Everything about his figures matters. It's like I said, very formative in my mid-teens. He's been my favorite artist since (and I grew up with an artist, so I kinda had to know the difference between Monet and Manet when I was 10 or was otherwise met with indignation and/or scornful looks) and he's got so much material I'm always discovering something.

Never seen his works in person though.
She was born in 1898 in a barn. She died on the thirty-seventh floor of a skyscraper. She's an astronaut.
#69
 Schiele's paintings always looked to me like they were done by a quadruple amputee painting with their mouth.
#74
I liked this painter before I found out this guy was local.

Finding out he started in Brixton with his tortured artist self just confirms that this city/this part of town is culturally richer than a lot of places I've set foot in.
Quote by laid-to-waste
look nigga, if you're chillin with 5 bros and 2 hos, you're gonna wanna pay attention to all of em equally. not moon over the hos forever and laugh at every shitty thing they say and just stare at them all night, like some of my mates do.
Last edited by treborillusion at Mar 25, 2017,
#75
For as much time as I've invested in photography you'd think I'd have gotten into painters by now. I haven't.
#76
Quote by Diamond Dave
you remind me of people who don't like 2001

tbf is is extremely overrated


Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#77
Quote by Fat Lard
And I unironically stared at the lolwat painting for a long time once, so whoever did this one too. It's got layers

I never noticed the chipmunk with a camera. Was it always there?
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#79
It really is, but if you like it that's up to you
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#80
I don't have a favourite but i do like Turner.

Quote by Renka
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