#1
Alright y'all, I come seeking advice.

My local GC has a used Gretsch Electromatic G5622T, which is pretty gnarly. Meanwhile the boutique shop in the area has a sweet 1960s vintage Silvertone Stratotone. I'm just trying to gauge some opinions on what y'all would go with.

I have Strat, Tele, and LP style guitars so I'm trying to fill in that old school single coil/P90ish hole in my collection. I've also been into the Dan Auerbach/Jack White fuzzed out garage blues sound recently and I know Dan has used old Silvertones, while Jack has used Gretsch. So what do y'all think?
#2
Without seeing both to evaluate condition, I'd err on the side of newer, and buy the Gretsch.
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#4
Well, you can certainly cover "fuzzed out garage blues"  with any axe you already own.  If you NEED a new guitar and want the better player, get the Gretsch.  The Silvertone has a nice retro vibe but they were not great players at first.  Kinda like the Fender Mustang or Melody maker.  Basically it was a student guitar a few steps down from a Tele or Strat of the day. 
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

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#5
I'm going to recommend the Gretsch the Silvertone is going to definately have some great visual mojo but those 60's Silvertone were typically Japanese made guitars made before the Japanese got good at making guitars and often used cheap wood and hardware etc. I had a late 60's Silvertone I scored on ebay for $150 it was a Mosrite wannabe clone type thing it was in great shape and was totally stock but if I compared it to an Electromatic it wouldn't even be close.

My brother who already had a few nice guitars bugged the crap out of me to sell the Silvertone to him I finally caved when he offered $250 he just loved the mojo of it. It is a decent player but he coincidentally bought an Electromatic about a year later I'll let you guess which one sits in the gig bag and which one he plays all the time.
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#6
While I'm a bit of a sucker for unusual vintage guitars, I find that they can be a bit hit and miss - if not for tonal inconsistencies, I've often found some tuning issues or playability problems like an uncomfortable neck. I'd say go for the Gretsch as they are pretty solid guitars. I got an electromatic pro jet  like, twelve years ago and it still holds up - only reason why I haven't played it recently is because I need to replace the strap button and restring it and have been too lazy to do so.
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#7
Quote by donender
While I'm a bit of a sucker for unusual vintage guitars, I find that they can be a bit hit and miss - if not for tonal inconsistencies, I've often found some tuning issues or playability problems like an uncomfortable neck. I'd say go for the Gretsch as they are pretty solid guitars. I got an electromatic pro jet  like, twelve years ago and it still holds up - only reason why I haven't played it recently is because I need to replace the strap button and restring it and have been too lazy to do so.


^ This in a nutshell. These old Japanese guitar are very hit or miss some models were made with great buils quality others not so much, often inferior wood een plywood was used to make the bodies and even the necks, thats right even the necks could be plywood. Not "sheet" plywood but plywood non the less.

I had a mid 60's Silvertone that was a copy of a Mosrite that I have since sold on to my brother but it had a plywood or laminated neck made of severall plies that ran the length of the neck perpendicular to the fretboard and DID have a truss rod, TBH the neck was nice and straight and played well for it's age. I'm not sure what the body was made of but I had to switch the strap button as it had stripped out I tried longer screws but the wood just kept crumbling when I put the weight of the guitar hanging from the strap and the hole kept stripping out. I finally put one of those Dimarzio straps on it that have the small section that attaches permanantly to the guitar with the main part of the strap that clicked on to them with those kind of fasteners that you see on a skid vest with the strap button gone the leverage was changed and the strap worked without pulling out.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge