#2
I think you need to learn note names with relevant intervals and then figure out which note is the main note​ in each chord. Chord id apps are useless without context
#3
Quote by NeoMvsEu
I think you need to learn note names with relevant intervals and then figure out which note is the main note​ in each chord. Chord id apps are useless without context

I'd be interested in learning that, do you have any article links or pointers?
#4
yooksi same my guitar teacher has been putting off on teaching me that so i just stopped with his lessons
#7
Quote by NeoMvsEu

One thing I noticed :
"Asus2/C#
.....

Asus2 = A B E

therefore Asus2/C# = C# A B E"

How can it be a sus2 when there's a C#? Shouldn't it be Aadd2/C# or Aadd9/C#?
#9
Could it also be C#m7#5 ? Would depend on context I guess.

It's another bit of ambiguity I have found in chord naming.

If you had an Am/G, I would just play an Am stacked on top of a G note.
Overall, it is an Am7, but in 3rd inversion.

But, if you see Am7/G, it seems that the 7th is most times omitted from the top, (but not always) and moved to the bass, so it is still Am/G.
I've seen the slash used as poly chords, Eg.  Dm/GM, which is a G9. Also seen in Jazz Am/G bass, to signify it is not a poly chord.
I just see the Asus2/C# as an Asus2/ chord,  with whatever note is designated for the bass as separate from the main chord voicing.


A nice simple run down  is Asus2/C#, Asus2/C, Asus2/B, Asus2/A

If that was A(add9)/C#, what's to say I can't have a C# doubled in the upper voicing? Asus2 tells you no 3rd in the upper voicing.

Should it be A(add9)/C#, Am(add9)/C, A(add9)/B, A(add9)   ?

What if I had A(add9)/C#, and wanted C#,A,C#,E,B, what would I call it so the C# doesn't get taken out and pushed to the bottom?
#10
m7#5 does NOT exist.

C#-A-B-E

in thirds, A-C#-E-x-B

Augmented intervals are unstable, and the E-G## (too lazy to find the double sharp symbol) is naturally heard as a perfect fourth, not an augmented third.
#11
Quote by NeoMvsEu
NSpen1

add9/C# preferable; the overall majority looked ok though

Most of it looked ok, but also

"you can have things like Csus4add9 etc."

I thought a sus chord didn't have a third, and an add chord did, seems a logical impossibility
I'm sure I've seen a 'double sus' chord written before, so Csus2sus4 ?
#13
So, can you guys point me towards some references that support this.

What is a sus4/3rd chord then?  like  Dsus4/F#

Everything  I can find doesn't support your claims. The basic rules appear to be the note after the slash, ie the bass note, can be part of the chord, can be doubled, can be shifted down, or not part of the chord at all.
Is it just that you prefer it that way?

An A add9/C#   could easily be voiced as C#, A, C#,E, B., which is not C#, A, B, E.
#14
Vreid

add4.

re: chords - any doubling does not change the nature of the chord; the same goes with note reordering to a point. xx3213 is an Fadd9 chord; 3x321x is acting as a G-rooted chord (tension in bass is root), G9sus4.
#15
Hi Vreid.

I am also lost when it comes to chord naming, as well as a lot of the theory concepts. I mean I kinda get it... but not 100%.

A few yrs ago I found some decent freeware called EZ-chord and EZ-scale... Was mostly a reference tool. And you *might* still get into the naming conventions. But you can SEE what they call xxxx chord in the chart. It's​ somewhere to start, and it's free. At least it was lol. But there's probably an app that does the same​ thing now days.