#1
I have played acoustic guitars all my life and therefore have little or no first hand experience of electric guitars, amplifiers, etc... I have taken the plunge into the world of electrics and am due to recieve my Nik Huber Krautser II very soon. I am requesting any recommendations for an amplifier to match this, please.

I am not sure exactly what you might want to know, so I'll do my best to outline bith specification requirements and personal preferences.

The Krautser will come equipped with a 1959 vintage haussell humbucker pickup in the bridge and a P90 in the neck. It is made of Spanish Cedar, with a maple neck and ebony fretboard. It can also be coil tapped in the bridge humbucker.

As for my preferences, I would really like a versatile amplifier. I would appreciate a very good overdriven sound above all. My requirements may be a little vast, but given all the different styles of music I like, I would hope to be able to play things from blues, pop, rock to the heavier side. 

I dont mind a combo or head and cabinet. The only amplifiers I have been researching are the Mesa Boogie 5:50 and the Carol Ann HS2 and I think the OD2-R.

Many thanks in advance for your suggestions.
#2
Damn! A Krautster II? Way to jump into electrics with both feet- that's a helluva guitar.

What's your budget? Mesa and Carol Anne aren't cheap, I know.
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#3
dannyalcatraz Thank you for the compliment, I know how lucky I am!

 I'm looking at approximately $1500 US dollars. I quote dollars since the Carol Ann is quoted to me in that currency, but I don't live in the USA, I would be happy to import if required. I would also be happy with used. Do you think this wouldbe good enough to meet the needs of the Krautster II? I would possibly use the amp for small (ish) venues and home recording.

thanks
#4
$1500 is an ample budget for a decent amp to cover blues, pop & rock. In fact, some $700 amps may make you happy, too.

Since you're not in the USA, Carvin amps like the Vai Legacy 3, V3 and V3M are probably not cost effective compared to some others. Still, if you see one, try it.

Any Fenders or Voxes in the $700+ range would probably make you happy. I personally own a Fender HRD, but it was a coin toss between it and a similarly priced Vox. And now Fender has the very tasty Bassbreaker 45...

My taste in Mesas tends towards the discontinued Transatlantic and Royal Atlantic (plenty of nice ones of both in the used market), and their new Triple Crown. I know the TC is a little bit pricier than your stated budget, but they're killers. Great tones, and feature laden...including that rarity for upscale tube amps, a headphone jack.

I just bought an Orange TH30 head, but haven't picked up my cab yet, soooooo... Still, I bought mine to handle the heavier stuff I want to play, but it might lighten up enough for your needs.

A dark horse candidate would be one of the higher end Quilters like the Aviator or Steelaire. Heck, even their "lesser" amps sound great and have plenty of power, they just don't have as many features. They're solid state, but they're not modeling amps. Impressive tones, and can take pedals well. I'm planning on getting one within a year, possibly replacing my HRD.

Supro is a good option, and they can deliver anything up to Zepplinesque hard rock with ease.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#5
How much room do you have? At that kind of budget you can get an amp that does everything, or several amps aimed more specifically at certain tones.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
True- splitting that budget roughly into thirds could get a decent cab and 2 very differently voiced amps. Especillay if you shop for used gear.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
Dave_Mc Thanks for the response. I have a budget of approxiamtely $1500. I hadn't actually considered space, but I don't have a lot. Any recommendations would be greatfully appreciated.
#8
dannyalcatraz I am very interested in the Mesa Boogie Triple Crown. I like the size, controls and options, headphone socket and especially the idea of being able to plug the amplifier head straight into the mixing desk without a speaker cabinet or the need of a microphone. Having said that, what speaker cabinet would you recommned with that? The Mesa Boogie website shows it with a Rectifier 2x12 compact extension cabinet.
#9
No worries if you don't have space, I just mentioned it in case you do.

Do you tend more to err towards modern or more vintage tones? A lot of the do-it-all type amps tend to be on the more modern side of things.

Off the top of my head, though, and considering you're in the USA, Bogner (Ecstacy, I'd imagine), Fryette (various models) and the Mesas you're looking at would be worth considering I'd think. I've heard good things about the CAE OD 100 but I haven't tried it. I also haven't tried any Carol Anns.

There's probably another bunch of things worth considering, too, which I haven't thought of. The problem when you have a good budget is that you almost have too much choice... and often not a lot of dealers which stock that type of gear. So you're sort of artificially limited to what you can try, unless you are ok with ordering something you haven't tried (and sending it back if you don't like it, so you'd want to buy from a store with a good return policy).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
Setting aside the guitar and the budget for a second, start with the space you'll have to work with and the budget you have for pedals. If you're mostly playing in a den or a bedroom, you don't have an overwhelming need for power, and you have to realize that you're going to have issues with hard walls close in and that you'll be likely working pretty close to the amp itself. Distortion raises other concerns in a small space, because you begin to have harmonics created in all kinds of unappealing and uncontrollable ways, and an amp that sounds amazing in the shop or on stage will sound like chaos in a smaller room.  I've watched people burn through amps, pickups, guitars, etc., in a futile search for one that sounds good to them only to realize that it was the room and amp positioning sabotaging everything. 

Start with speakers. I'm using decent powered nearfield monitors on 36" stands. They have a wider range than most guitar speakers, so if you want bottom end, you can have it. This (for me) worked better than having 12" speakers barking at my ankles. 

The only remaining task was to find a versatile preamp or two. I have old rackmount tube preamps (Carvin Quad-X, Mesa Triaxis, Egnater M4), a recent Axe-FX. All good. I've also been working a lot with a Helix because that's what I cart along when I leave for rehearsals and production. Any one of those preamps would have to be considered far more versatile than what you get in a stock tube amp and all of them will go on the road with you. 

I *do* appreciate the ethos of a basic tube amp and all, but we've come a long way in the last half century...
#11
andytl755

I'd go with a 1x12", 1x15" or 2x12". I own a Fender combo with a 12", and am $200 away from buying a compact Orange 2x12".

Since it was introduced st NAMM 2017, there are some people raving about Quilter's new 2x8, but I'd want to hear that one in person.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#12
dspellman Thanks for the information. Is the final comment about coming along way in the last half century reffering to non-tube amplifiers? Do you think they are better?
#13
dannyalcatraz Thank you for the advice.  The Mesa Boogie Triple Crown seems like a very versatlile solution that should cover anything I might ever throw at it - so to speak. I know that the Carol Ann amps are expensive, but they are comparative to the TC, so my question is do you think the TC is better option than the Carol Ann's. I know it is all subjective but I am looking for some good advice from someone thst knows more than me. Many thanks again, you have been really helpful and it is appreciated.
#14
My guess is that the Carol Ann will deliver some better tones than the Mesa, but the Mesa is no slouch and will be a lot more versatile.

Years ago, I remember reading a high-end sports car review. Of all the exotic cars they tried, the Porsche never came in 1st in any performance category. But it was still the Editors' pick for best because it racked up 2nd or 3rd place in almost every category.

That's kind of how I view the TC.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#15
Quote by andytl755
dspellman Thanks for the information. Is the final comment about coming along way in the last half century reffering to non-tube amplifiers? Do you think they are better?


I'm not going to get into the "better" debate. But I've got a whole pack of tube amps  and a bunch of modern modelers, and while there may be some differences, there are none that keep me from using the modelers. As for the power amplification itself (downstream of the modeler/ preamp), the non-tube stuff is FAR more powerful, much lighter, cleaner (power tube distortion is sorta not a thing these days) and doesn't require a re-tube, ever.
#16
dannyalcatraz Thank you again for the help. I am very close to the Triple Crown, although it is working out a bit miney more than expected. One final quick question please is when purchasing a cabinet to go with it, am I best going for the Mesa Boogie Cab, or other brand? I can't remember who, but somebody recommended the EVH. Any input is appreciated.
#17
Cabs are a whole other mess.

Mesa makes good cabs, but so do other companies. Look for something that's going to deliver a good sound (usually a 1x12 or larger) without being too big to fit your lifestyle (almost nobody NEEDS a 4x12).

Make sure it's rated to handle the power of the amp. (A TC is 50w; most- but not all- cabs will handle that.)

Then check out what speakers are in them...

When in doubt, ask the salesperson, or better yet, contact the cab maker. Tell them what you want to play and the amp you'll be using. They'll help sort you out.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#18
Quote by dannyalcatraz

When in doubt, ask the salesperson


Yeah, then instead of only thinking you might be wrong, you'll be sure you've got the wrong answer!
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?