#1
Folks,

The time has come - I decided to move forward with my fingerstyle - thats why I jump from the laminated Ibanez V72 to the all solid (sitka + walnut) Furch D21.
I bought it two weeks ago, since then ive play alot - however after the weekend break (i was out) i noticed that the tension of the string was reduced - the guitar was out of tune.  

Then i also noticed that at some frets E6 - 7th and 8th / G3 from 9th to 12th the sound was out of tune as well. Like when u change the string lenght. 

To the point - I've found that the top of the guitar is a bit deflected in some areas (see photos). Im not aware about exact humidity in my room (i live in Poland - so not much dry or humid ) but the higrometer is on the way so i will check that. 

Or maybe i'm just exaggerate and this kind of shape is completly normal for the solid guitar. 
Thats why im ask You these of You which has some more experience with solid wood guitar to look at the photos below /link to the album/ and tell me what u think about it. 

https://imageshack.com/a/AIDl/1

Thanks in advance
#4
It looks as if the bridge is rotating in image 7, and the bulge is normal, and looks moderate to me but not extreme. My two old flattops are a lot worse than that, but yours is new, so I would keep an eye on it. Also, you have a lot of saddle left for making adjustments to the action height, so the neck angle is good, assuming that it was OK when you received it. What I don't like the look of is that gap I can see between the top and the bridge in image 8. I would get a tech to have a look at it.

My guitars go out of tune all the time with changing humidity, but it isn't due to drastic changes that might cause damage.
Last edited by Tony Done at Mar 28, 2017,
#5
Mattijah Did you have any changes in home heating system this weekend, because my guitar always substantially goes out of tune every spring and autumn, when central heating turned on/off?
#6
Tony Done  Thanks for the reply - i agree the tiny gap just beneath the bride seems odd. Definitely i will go visit tech guy. Now i'm trying to figure out if the condition might be not so good even before the purchase. My fault i did not take to much attention to these details before. 

Udjine It might be that the wheater outside and changes in the heating system played some role in that.However, as i mentioned below i would like to know if there is no long-term storage issues (in the shop) or manufacturing defects.

Thanks guys for the replies!
#7
Mattijah  My first question is, "has the bulging issue has much of an effect on the action height"?

Many factors can have a profound effect on a bulging top.

1: Likely most common, humidity too high where the guitar is stored and played. But as Tony has said some bulge is inevitable. The top being completely flat or concave would be a worse condition. Either factor would indicate too low humidity, and top cracking would likely soon follow..

2: Too high of a string tension. I'm going to suggest you string the guitar NO HEAVIER than a "custom light set", which numerically would be .011 to .052, at least until we can find the cause of the problem. If the guitar top is "too wet" (high humidity). lighter strings, along with even possibly a tune down when you're not playing it, will possibly help the top "relax", and get flatter.

3: The guitar top could possibly have been not fully cured when i\t was put on the guitar. Manufacturers are quite careful about properly aging and conditioning their woods, but hey, sometimes stuff happens.

4: It is also possible that the top braces have been scalloped too deeply. Makers try to thin out tops and scallop braces to provide us with more responsive instruments. The downside is these guitars can be a bit more fragile, and more susceptible to environmental conditions as well.

As far as the bridge goes, you really shouldn't be able to slide so much as a piece of loose leaf paper between it and the guitar top.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 28, 2017,
#8
Quote by Udjine
Mattijah Hi and welcome to forum! Did you try to contact the manufacturer?

Quote by Udjine
Mattijah Did you have any changes in home heating system this weekend, because my guitar always substantially goes out of tune every spring and autumn, when central heating turned on/off?

These were my 1st 2 thoughts.  You shouldn't have belling bulge on a new guitar but from the pics it doesn't look like belly bulge.  The top of a flat top guitar is actually arched with an arch ranging from around 15-30 feet.  It looks like your highest point is just under the sound hole where it should be.  Humidity changes in spring and fall causes the top to grow and shrink more than most people realize.   A lot of music stores keep their solid wood guitars in a special climate controlled room with humidity at a consistent 45-50%.  If the humidity in your home is just a little higher for just a few hours the wood is going to expend and you get more of a bulge and if humidity is high for several days then the guitar can become temporarily unplayable.  To fix it you just need to bring the humidity back down to 50% or you need to lower the action at adjust the truss rod.  I always recommend a  adjusting these things about a month after you bring a new guitar home simply because your home will be a different enviroment and solid wood guitars are shift a lot.  If you don't know how to adjust these things take it to a luthier for a full setup including adjusting the saddle, nut, truss rod, and leveling frets.

If I'm wrong and it is belly bulge then your guitar is defective and should be returned or exchanged.  Belly bulge usually is caused by age, broken/ loose braces, under bracing, over scalloping bracing,  wood that is too thin, or wood that is abnormally soft.  None of those things are easily fixed and on a new guitar they are rarely worth fixing.
Not taking any online orders.
Last edited by CorduroyEW at Mar 29, 2017,
#9
1: Likely most common, humidity too high where the guitar is stored and played. But as Tony has said some bulge is inevitable. The top being completely flat or concave would be a worse condition. Either factor would indicate too low humidity, and top cracking would likely soon follow.

Captaincranky  I received today hygrometer - in the room where the guitar is stored the humidity oscilate around 40% however today was a bit rainy day so it may indicate that there is even lower humidity in here. Do You think it is to low ? Maybe the dry air is a problem here. 

 
CorduroyEW I catch contact with the store where the guitar was bought, show them photos etc. However they said that this kind of "shapes" are normal for the all instruments they have there. it calm me down a bit. Then i check what Captaincranky mentioned - the thin paper test - and the outcome is presented in the photos below <link>. There are some region where the thin paper can penetrate the space between the bridge and the top. 
What do You think about it? Is it serious?

https://imageshack.com/a/rcDl/1

I know that the dealer would propably tell me that there is everything alright with the instrument becouse he already sold it but i'm not quite sure. I've sent an mail to the manufacturer (Furch - Czech Republic) however i did not get any response yet. 

Thanks for all the responses!
#10
Yeah, it's not an issue with belly bulge which is good because your actual problem is easy to repair which means you have a chance of keeping your guitar.  Tony and Cranky were right about the bridge lifting tho.  You shouldn't be able to slide paper under any part of the bridge and the fact that you can says your guitar is defective.  You should take it back and have it repaired or replaced.
Not taking any online orders.
#11
Thanks for the reply - i really appreciate it. yep, it might be that his is not the bulge itself however the deformation may be the result of some quality issues. The dealer replied my that he will send my concerns (both with photos) to the manufacturer - so we will see - at least i've got two year warranty from the shop and three from the manufacturer so i believe it will cover that...
#12
Really, man, a lifting bridge can be an expensive fix on an acoustic.  With a guitar that new, the dealer should refund your money.  Amazon would, at 2 weeks.  You live in a cold climate.  If the guitar was sent to you tuned, the bridge and top could have undergone enough strain to cause the bridge to start lifting.  In any case, it will probably be covered by the warranty.  I had an inexpensive Oscar Schmidt 12 string that the bridge lifted on, and they paid the shipping and replaced it with a new guitar, 2 months after I bought it.