#1
Before I begin, I have to point out that this is NOT a for sale thread. I am simply looking for tips on how to get an idea on how much my bass is worth. Having said that, if this is in the wrong place, then I apologise.

I am currently in possession of a Carvin SB5000 bass guitar that I purchased a little over a year and a half ago. At the time I was looking for a five string bass, and managed to find this for a good price, but haven't gigged with it since purchasing it. I'm not in a huge rush to sell it at the moment, but recently I found out that this particular series of basses was discontinued about three years ago, and have hardly found any information online about how much they are worth second hand. 

I believe they retailed at somewhere between £1400 and £1500 (roughly $1760-$1890), and have seen them second hand for roughly £700 ($880) to £800 ($1000), but these sale posts went up either just before, or just after they were discontinued. 

Really what I'm asking is, as it's been discontinued for a few years, would it be worth more now? I would be quite happy to sell it for the previous prices quoted (again, not implying I'm selling it here), but I don't want to find out in a few months/years that i could have got a lot more for it. I've considered taking it into a bass for the guys there to have a look at it, but they would probably be looking at it from the perspective of a business trying to make a profit, rather than simply give advice on how much I should sell it for personally.

Here's a picture for reference - this isn't my bass but it's the same model. Will be happy to give specs if anyone is curious. Thanks!


WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
Last edited by donender at Mar 28, 2017,
#2
Quote by donender

Really what I'm asking is, as it's been discontinued for a few years, would it be worth more now? 

The quick answer is no, just because something is no longer made does not make it valuable, a Ford Pinto for example. 
"It's better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war"
#3
Quote by Smith357
The quick answer is no, just because something is no longer made does not make it valuable, a Ford Pinto for example. 

I was kind of thinking this might be the case - I guess if it had been discontinued for 20+ years and wasn't that common it might be a different story. Thanks though!

I was also making this thread to see if anyone had heard of this particular range of basses and how much they might have seen them retailing for, or going second hand.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#4
There are two online resources for pricing instruments, Reverb.com and UsedPrice.com.   However, if its not a really popular brand, generally Reverb won't have a listing.  UsedPrice does charge a subscription fee, I believe.

Ebay is also a good resource to see what people are willing to pay for an instrument. 
#5
There's no hard and fast rule as to how much to sell it for. At the end of the day, this is a mass produced bass guitar made by a company with little prestige after the heyday of guitar based music. There will never be a vintage market for instruments in the same way that early Fenders and Gibsons enjoy unless a company produces something really special.

Best you can do is keep an eye out for how much they've been sold for, try and sell for similar, but be prepared to take a hit on that.
#6
Quote by donender

I was also making this thread to see if anyone had heard of this particular range of basses and how much they might have seen them retailing for, or going second hand.

Carvins are well-respected. I have an '89 LB75 (see James Lomenzo of White Lion)  neck-through that usually sells for around $500-575 these days if it's in great shape. I've seen them listed recently on Reverb for prices well into $800 and $900 range, which seems a bit nuts to me. They sold for $699 new. 
Last edited by dspellman at Mar 28, 2017,
#7
Quote by Deliriumbassist


At the end of the day, this is a mass produced bass guitar made by a company with little prestige after the heyday of guitar based music. 

These are actually semi-custom bass guitars (made to individual specs)  built by a company pretty well respected, particularly on the bass side of things. 

It was designed to fill the requests for a Jazz bass style, but with Carvin's arm-long list of options, woods, etc.

There's no price bump because it's been discontinued (those days are long gone in the industry), but it probably hasn't depreciated all that much since you bought it. These guitars (and most semi-customs) usually take their biggest hit after the original purchase, since not everyone wants the same specs. If you bought it used, most of the depreciation has been sucked out of it and prices will remain surprisingly stable, based largely on condition. 

The last price I saw on them was about $1049 new direct from Carvin including case, and one recently went for around $895 (we think) on Reverb, another around the same price on the local Craigslist, so they haven't taken a great hit from new to resale.

Prices are determined by the market, of course
Last edited by dspellman at Mar 28, 2017,
#8
I suspect you may have trouble shifting it - two four string versions failed to sell on Basschat recently at around £750
#9
Quote by Deliriumbassist
There's no hard and fast rule as to how much to sell it for. At the end of the day, this is a mass produced bass guitar made by a company with little prestige after the heyday of guitar based music. There will never be a vintage market for instruments in the same way that early Fenders and Gibsons enjoy unless a company produces something really special.

Best you can do is keep an eye out for how much they've been sold for, try and sell for similar, but be prepared to take a hit on that.

Quote by dspellman
These are actually semi-custom bass guitars (made to individual specs)  built by a company pretty well respected, particularly on the bass side of things. 

It was designed to fill the requests for a Jazz bass style, but with Carvin's arm-long list of options, woods, etc.

There's no price bump because it's been discontinued (those days are long gone in the industry), but it probably hasn't depreciated all that much since you bought it. These guitars (and most semi-customs) usually take their biggest hit after the original purchase, since not everyone wants the same specs. If you bought it used, most of the depreciation has been sucked out of it and prices will remain surprisingly stable, based largely on condition. 

The last price I saw on them was about $1049 new direct from Carvin including case, and one recently went for around $895 (we think) on Reverb, another around the same price on the local Craigslist, so they haven't taken a great hit from new to resale.

Prices are determined by the market, of course

Yeah I believe the brand is quite well respected, and I shopped around a little before deciding on this one as it was one of the nicest basses to play, and as I already mentioned, I got really lucky with the timing and finding it at a nice price. The only reason the guy was selling it so cheap was because he had purchased about two grand worth of bass equipment and needed to make space and could use the cash. 

I know there was a fair amount of scope for customisation (I know another guy who has a four string version with an added drop tuner),  but the only distinction that sets my bass apart is the fact that it's a five string. I appreciate that four strings are probably in higher demand that five strings, and also that the fact that it's discontinued won't make it more valuable. If it was one of only a handful made and/or had some celebrity prestige then it might be a different story.

But yeah, thanks guys! I'll probably try to shift it for £700 to £800 with the hardcase. If i get no joy I'll drop the price. My intention for selling it was to probably downsize to a slightly cheaper bass and get a practice amp with the money left over. I figured there's no point in having a really good quality bass if I'm not gigging with it and don't even have a practice amp. Would have been nice to have a bit more cash to play around with, but it is what it is - getting greedy with it will get me nowhere.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#10
Basic supply and demand rules only apply if the bass is extremely rare and limited quantities were made.. also important factor is whether there is a want for the particular bass.. it's a buyers market after all.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.