#1
I'm sure you see a thread like this every week so I would've spared you from reading this but I didn't really get a good answer from my research on google, so here I am.

First of all I do own an electric guitar already, I bought it when I was around 13-14 years old tried to learn but gave up after less than a year.

I'm now 20 so there was a bit of a gap and I don't really remember anything, now considering that I work 8 hours a day and always at different shifts I can't really take private lessons, so I was hoping to learn with YouTube tutorials, however every single one I've watched was either recorded in such a low quality that was barely impossible to understand anything or was asking me to pay (and yes I understand they make a living out of it but I'd rather not pay).

Can you guys suggest a good way to learn on my own? Possibly free.

Also how often should I practice? I've been told it's necessary to practice everyday but with my schedule it's not really an easy thing to do.

And I know this takes time and I'm not aiming at being a pro, I'd just like to learn and know what's the "best" way to approach this, it's something that I've always wanted to do but never actually did.
#2
If you are starting from scratch, id recommend justinguitar.com and follow his beginner and then intermediate course (Its free). Once you've got some chords down then feel free to try learn songs you know and deviate off his lessons a bit. Just practise when you can, obviously the more the better but whatever suits you, you'll get there, 30 mins or an hour a day is fine
#3
Quote by smithy15493
If you are starting from scratch, id recommend justinguitar.com and follow his beginner and then intermediate course (Its free). Once you've got some chords down then feel free to try learn songs you know and deviate off his lessons a bit. Just practise when you can, obviously the more the better but whatever suits you, you'll get there, 30 mins or an hour a day is fine

Thank you, I can probably squeeze 30mins almost everyday.
I'll definitely check out justin guitar.


PS: Is it ok if I practice without an amp? I do have one but I'd rather not get angry neighbors with pitchforks in front of my door. 
Last edited by thisisabadname at Mar 31, 2017,
#4
lesson 1 .. pluck the strings like turning keys 
lesson 2 .. fretting thumb runs parallel with neck 
lesson 3 .. cliffs of Dover intro 
27mMoV31II7.a2
#5
Be patient, learning guitar is not an istant gratification activity. This is probably the most important thing I can tell you, I tried to teach my son to play when he asked I bought him a relativly nice guitar (better than my first 3 or 4) and after a few weeks he was done, the guitar left collecting dust I eventually took the guitar for myself and upgraded the pickups etc.

He did not have the patience to learn it's a long road that can be especially frustrating in the beginning.

Also play every day if you can squeeze in 30 minutes that would be great and do 45 min or an hour when possible.

In the beginning take small steps and try to get good at one thing at a time before delving into other stuff all the while keep practicing on what you have you have already somewhat mastered.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

Last edited by Evilnine at Mar 31, 2017,
#6
Along with Justinguitar and other free online lessons, you can also join your local library for a couple bucks and check out some beginner guitar books. I'm a beginner and a single Dad so I know about not having tons of time, but you will find that if it is something that you kind of fall in love with (like I did) finding time wont be the biggest hurdle. Keep it simple, learn a couple easy chords and scales.
Flying in a blue dream
#7
Quote by Evilnine
Be patient, learning guitar is not an istant gratification activity. This is probably the most important thing I can tell you, I tried to teach my son to play when he asked I bought him a relativly nice guitar (better than my first 3 or 4) and after a few weeks he was done, the guitar left collecting dust I eventually took the guitar for myself and upgraded the pickups etc.

He did not have the patience to learn it's a long road that can be especially frustrating in the beginning.

Also play every day if you can squeeze in 30 minutes that would be great and do 45 min or an hour when possible.

In the beginning take small steps and try to get good at one thing at a time before delving into other stuff all the while keep practicing on what you have you have already somewhat mastered.

I have to admit that was the reason why I quit when I was 13, I'm not gonna let it happen again. 
#10
Antimage27 TobusRex  Guys, I think he's looking for something constructive and useful, not trolls.

thisisabadname As Smithy said, I definitely suggest you check out justinguitar.com.  His advice is helpful and he knows how to effectively convey his information.  And considering that it's free, you can't really go wrong.  He'll definitely help you get started.  If you have any questions about certain techniques or anything, we're also always here to help.  I might also be able to suggest some other resources depending on what style you want to play and where you want to get to.  What are some songs that you want to learn?
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#12
Quote by thisisabadname

Can you guys suggest a good way to learn on my own? Possibly free.

Also how often should I practice? I've been told it's necessary to practice everyday but with my schedule it's not really an easy thing to do.

And I know this takes time and I'm not aiming at being a pro, I'd just like to learn and know what's the "best" way to approach this, it's something that I've always wanted to do but never actually did.

The most direct way to learn on your own is to do just that; sit with the guitar, play it, learn it. This is the way it was done before the internet, videos, books, lessons, and methods, and it still works quite well. Almost all of the guitar music that people still like today came from guitarists that used this simple approach; learning by playing.

Practice time will compete with other things (TV, movies, games, etc.), so some balance needs to be established. Daily is best, multiple short times are better than single long times.

"Best" way... there is no best way, but the various ways do come with advantages and disadvantages. I am biased toward self learning because being shown something is not learning, figuring out and discovering something is learning. This is slower at first but later is faster without bound.
A lot of people try to "learn" by some jump starting promise using apps, tools, tabs, books, videos, etc. which give the illusion of progress at first, but later reveal that little was actually learned resulting in frustration. None of those things can learn for you, it has to be you, and the direct way to ensure it is to figure out and discovery things yourself.

Everything you want to know is already in the songs you want to play. Focus on learning songs by listening to them and figuring them out on the guitar.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
Last edited by PlusPaul at Apr 1, 2017,
#13
This is general purpose advice about learning any new skill. It applies to learning guitar, but it also applies to learning how to paint, cook, or do lots of other things. Start by setting a goal and/or defining a purpose. For example, some of the best guitarists I know had as their original goal the desire to learn the acoustic guitar well enough to accompany themselves while singing. Other guitarists I know had no interest in singing, and simply wanted to be acclaimed for their skill at shredding metal leads while wearing extremely tight trousers. Still others wanted to become the new Wes Montgomery, playing smooth jazz. I've known some who wanted to be able to play every guitar solo ever recorded on any Top 40 song, and that's all. I've known guitarists who wanted to create new riffs and write songs. It's all good. The thing is, each of those goals has a slightly different path to reach. Once you know the location of your destination, it's easier to discern the best path to get there. That's not to say that there aren't similarities, or that each path is 100% unique. My path worked for me, but it might not work for you. The same goes for everyone else's path. So, if you'll share more about your goals, it would then be easier for others to give you more meaningful guidance. 
#14
gerdner 

Wise words, there.
Hope thisisabadname does share his goals.
Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
#15
Quote by PlusPaul
gerdner

Wise words, there.
Hope thisisabadname does share his goals.

My goal is mainly get to the point where I'm able to play the songs I like.
#16
Quote by thisisabadname
My goal is mainly get to the point where I'm able to play the songs I like.

That's a good start. If the songs you like are old school hard rock with lots of shredding, then there are good ways to learn how to play that. If the songs you like are modern pop songs, then there are different ways to learn that style of playing. If the songs you like are, well, I think you see the point, right? I started out learning all the different chord shapes, and different strumming patterns. Later I learned how to play individual notes. Other players started out learning the notes and playing melody lines, and only learned chords later on. Either way is good. Either way works. The better choice for you would depend on what kind of songs you like. 
#18
Quote by gerdner
That's a good start. If the songs you like are old school hard rock with lots of shredding, then there are good ways to learn how to play that. If the songs you like are modern pop songs, then there are different ways to learn that style of playing. If the songs you like are, well, I think you see the point, right? I started out learning all the different chord shapes, and different strumming patterns. Later I learned how to play individual notes. Other players started out learning the notes and playing melody lines, and only learned chords later on. Either way is good. Either way works. The better choice for you would depend on what kind of songs you like. 

I like this style:

As far as song genre is hard to pick something, I listen so many different genres.
#19
A bit of an update, I started following the justinguitar tutorial, I'm now practicing changing chords between A,D and E.

As of now I'm pretty slow at changing chords.
#20
The more you practice those same movements, the easier it will become.  Muscle memory will be your best friend.
#22
Quote by thisisabadname
A bit of an update, I started following the justinguitar tutorial, I'm now practicing changing chords between A,D and E.

As of now I'm pretty slow at changing chords.

Try to find a chord chart that's really easy (preferably to a song you can play along with a track too) and work through it. That's how I got started.
#Acoustic Life
#23
Any friends or relatives that play?My cousin taught me for a while when i first started.I also had a few friends at the time that started out the same time and we used to pick up stuff from each other.
#24
thisisabadname

I play 90% of the time in my office or living room unplugged on either a stratocaster, a les paul, or my flying v. It's fine. You'll find once you do plug in there's a bit of an adjustment. But it's fine and you just need to be more accurate and control your strings,a little more. Since you are a true beginner that would take time to learn anyway.

Good luck, keep it simple, and have fun.
#25
Quick question as I'm trying to get better at switching between A,D and E (unfortunately I'm still not fast enough to even reach 1 chord per second, should I just continue with learning the other chords?

Also I found this https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/m/misc_computer_games/the_last_of_us_-_main_theme_ver4_tab.htm (tabs for the last of us theme song) which looked pretty easy to follow if I can get my fingers to move fast enough, however it doesn't really sound like it should, maybe because my rythm is not good but it sounds like it should at the "12-0-0" part but when I switch to "9-0-0" it sounds completely different from the song, is it because I'm on an electric guitar? The guitar should be tuned correctly.
#26
Quote by awesomehuggles321
Yousician. 


Looks really cool, and it has a linux application too, I'm gonna try it out along justinguitar.
Is the free version enough though?
#27
Quote by thisisabadname
Quick question as I'm trying to get better at switching between A,D and E (unfortunately I'm still not fast enough to even reach 1 chord per second, should I just continue with learning the other chords?

Think about it logically - how many songs do you know where the chord changes every second?
Actually called Mark!

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#29
Steve Stine has really helped me out as a guitarist. It's gonna be tough though, so expect some frustration. I didn't learn my first song til after 2 months of playing guitar and that was The Wabash Cannonball by Ernie Ford, a simple chord song. But I did catch on quickly after that. I learned Monster by Skillet a couple of weeks later and only a day after that, I decided to learn Eye of the tiger by Survivor, that one took about a month for me. One last thing, don't forget the metronome! Literally God's greatest gift to guitarists!
#30
What are some easy songs to learn? As of now the only song I can play somewhat decently is seven nation army, are there other easy songs like that one which I can try? I like "fingerstyle" tabs, although as far as I know they are not that great on an electric guitar it's all I got right now.
#31
The first song I learned was the sound of silence, not much to it, super easy but sounds cool when you get it right. You can pick-up some easy riff's like the Black Keys Lonely Boy, some pretty cool Beatles riff's, do a "easy tab" Google search. Also, I'm working on the John Patrucci "Rock Discipline" at the moment and I highly recommend it, if you can get one do it. I've jumped light years ahead of any other program I would have been working with. Of course I haven't had any time to do anything else like songs or noodle around, but I'm sticking with JP on this, when I'm done I'll readdress songs and see were I stand then. Working just on songs alone didn't seem to be getting me anywhere, as far as progressing on my own, scales and smooth chord changes did.
Flying in a blue dream
#33
thisisabadname  I self taught my self by learning from how to video's on YouTube.com and also going to a local music store and hanging out and learning from other people. The thing is you dont want to bite off more than you can play at first. Just find a song that you know and try to learn it, Its easy to learn if you know how the song, Then its all about practicing, And when learning you have to do a lot of it.  Everyone that is good at playing has to practice a lot to get their playing down,