#1
This is probably a really n00b question, and I expect nothing less than ridicule and taunting between answers

I'm trying to figure out triads but became stumped once a  capo was thrown into the mix. If a song has, on the UG tab, one key and then a capo is added thus changing the key/chords, will the triad then reflect the original key or the capoed one? 
Like Songs:Ohia's Farewell Transmission which had C# and E and B, but with capo it's A, C and G.

Dagnammit, I know I had another question but I plum forgot right now. But this one takes precedence.
#2
If you want to play a tune which you have learned without a capo with triads in it with a capo you need to move the triads up the neck by the same no. of frets as the capo.  
Last edited by PSimonR at Mar 31, 2017,
#3
Quote by AnrBjotk
This is probably a really n00b question, and I expect nothing less than ridicule and taunting between answers

I'm trying to figure out triads but became stumped once a  capo was thrown into the mix. If a song has, on the UG tab, one key and then a capo is added thus changing the key/chords, will the triad then reflect the original key or the capoed one?
Like Songs:Ohia's Farewell Transmission which had C# and E and B, but with capo it's A, C and G.

Dagnammit, I know I had another question but I plum forgot right now. But this one takes precedence.

Quote by PSimonR
If you want to play a tune which you have learned without a capo with triads in it with a capo you need to move the triads up the neck by the same no. of frets as the capo.  

Yup - just to expand on your reference to the song key. Putting a capo on 4 is going to raise the songs key by 2 whole steps. So if the original key was C you would play the same chord shapes but you would be playing in the key of E.

I often recommend learning without the capo first then deciding the best way to play the song. This should give you a better understanding of theory behind what you are doing.

Hope this helps,
Kevin
#4
To the other replies -
No, I don't think this is what AnrBjotk is asking at all.
In this case the original tab is without a capo; the chords are C#, E and B.
Playing it with a capo on the 4th fret, the chord forms used are A, C and G. Moving those forms up 4 frets / semitones gives you C#, E, B again; the chords do not change.
#5
When you fret a string, the string touches the fret in front of your finger (nearer the body of the guitar).  That shortens the length of strring vibrating, so the pitch produced is higher.  The nut (think of that as fret zero) does the same job as your finger, for the pitch produced by the open string.  The tension from the tuning peg across the nut holds it down there.

Any chord is a relationship of pitches at various "distances" (semitones) apart from each other.  If you slide the chord shape unchanged, the chord type stays the same (the relationships are unaltered, and it is these relationships that give a chord type a particular sound),.  The pitches involved change, but they are all still the same distances apart.  So you hear the same sound flavour, just higher in pitch overall.  The name of the chord will change as you slide it.  The chord type doesn't.

If open strings are involved in the original shape, then to maintain shape, you either have to introduce a barre (that does what the nut was doing for you), or use a capo (again, does the same as the nut).  If you don't, then the overall distances involved won't be maintained, and the chord type changes.

So, suppose you orginally played A, D, E,  using open strings.  (major triads in key of A).  If you now place capo behind 5th fret, and play same shapes in front of the capo, these chords have all shifted up by 5 semitones.  The key has shifted up by 5 semitones.  You now have D, G, A.  The new key is D.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Apr 1, 2017,
#6
jerrykramskoy
Look at his example. It's not a case of playing chords, then playing the same chord shapes with a capo and moving the pitch up.
It's playing three chords without a capo, then playing chord shapes for lower chords with a capo so that they match the original chords. Same principle but coming at it from a different angle.
#8
jerrykramskoy
oh ok, I didn't watch the video
I meant the tab is for chords without a capo, then we see he's using different chord shapes with a capo to get those same chords (pitchwise).
#9
Quote by NSpen1
jerrykramskoy
oh ok, I didn't watch the video
I meant the tab is for chords without a capo, then we see he's using different chord shapes with a capo to get those same chords (pitchwise).

I'm sorry, which video are we all referring to?  
But we're all agreed? You just move the same amount as the capo?
Quote by NSpen1
To the other replies -
No, I don't think this is what AnrBjotk is asking at all.
In this case the original tab is without a capo; the chords are C#, E and B.
Playing it with a capo on the 4th fret, the chord forms used are A, C and G.  Moving those forms up 4 frets / semitones gives you C#, E, B again; the chords do not change.


Wooah! Total mindfunk! 
Is that a coinkydink or just laws of guitar-physics?
#10
Quote by AnrBjotk
I'm sorry, which video are we all referring to?  

The one which you linked to in the comments on that tab

Wooah! Total mindfunk! 
Is that a coinkydink or just laws of guitar-physics?

Haha, totally not a coincidence. It's two ways of playing the same chords, one without a capo and one with a capo.
We may be confusing you more than you already were to start with, but let me try to put it simply.
For this song the chords you need are C#, E, B . To play them in standard tuning without a capo you just play, well, C#, E, B .
Another way to play them is with a capo on the 4th fret. Then you play them as A, C, G chord forms but with the capo they go up in pitch, e.g.
A > A# > B > C > C# , up 4 semitones. You end up with C#, E, B again.

But usually, yes, play some chords then play the same chord forms with a capo - the chords move up the same number of semitones as the fret number the capo is on.
e.g. play G, C, D ... put a capo on the 5th fret, play same chord forms ... you get C, F, G.
#11
Quote by NSpen1
The one which you linked to in the comments on that tab


Haha, totally not a coincidence.  It's two ways of playing the same chords, one without a capo and one with a capo.
We may be confusing you more than you already were to start with, but let me try to put it simply.
For this song the chords you need are C#, E, B . To play them in standard tuning without a capo you just play, well, C#, E, B .
Another way to play them is with a capo on the 4th fret.  Then you play them as A, C, G chord forms but with the capo they go up in pitch, e.g.
A > A# > B > C > C# , up 4 semitones.  You end up with C#, E, B again.

But usually, yes, play some chords then play the same chord forms with a capo - the chords move up the same number of semitones as the fret number the capo is on.
e.g. play G, C, D ... put a capo on the 5th fret, play same chord forms ... you get C, F, G.

And I appreciate your attempt at teaching me. I know it don't seem like it, but little by little this fancy book learnin' is getting through.
For those who did watch the video, what is the that little triad-ish thing he plays after G on alternate rounds? That's really the reason I asked. 

I tried doing A triads, but it sounded odd, but I'm guessing if I move it up four frets it'll scan(?) - even though I'm not entirely sure which variation he's using.