#1
Alright so this is very hard for me to explain but I need your guys' help as I am not the most musically educated person so bear with me. As I have been developing my taste over the years I have run into certain songs that just move me and I have not been able to pinpoint exactly why even after studying said songs. So lately I have begun to dive into Derek Trucks' guitar playing and I realized that he can consistently make the sound that I have so desperately wanted to hear and make myself. The sound is only in certain songs though, I love the blues more than anything but what I am looking for is almost like an extension of the blues. It's really interesting to me because even before I could play the guitar and even knew what a scale was, my favorite songs had this sound. For example, my favorite song of all time is Layla, more specifically the piano coda at the end. This has been my favorite since I can remember, I have done as much research into the song as I can and that is actually what led me to Derek Trucks via Duane Allman. The way EC solos over the outro in the live versions is just beautiful. Other examples are: 
Jerry Douglas' ending dobro solo on The Boxer, starts at 3:22
Everything about the song Midnight In Harlem(Derek Trucks really epitomizes the sound in question during this song)
John Mayers 50 sec cover of Drown In My Own Tears(Really interesting how he gets a slide guitar sound with no slide):
This Sky by Derek Trucks:
Layla piano outro(The way EC solos at the end):
I can find other examples if needed, but the best way I could describe the sound i'm looking for is just sweet, beautiful, and warm. I have listened to some Derek Trucks interviews and he always talks about how he feels that you should "sing" with your instrument, he believes that the best players play the guitar lyrically. I think this has a lot to do with the sound I am looking for, being able to translate the emotion and nuance of a great vocalist to the guitar. I know a lot of this has to do with the nuances and subtleties of their playing as they are masters but I am wondering what all of these guitar pieces have in common that I am missing. I am asking for any suggestions of songs that have that same sound because I just cant get enough, and also if possible, an explanation of why those songs sound like that(I do not mind theory at all), and what I can study and practice so that I can learn to make my own. I am just lost and I need to know if someone has the answers haha. Thanks, any kind of advice would be greatly appreciated and sorry for the long winded post. 
#2
Midnight in Harlem is in E major.  He's using a lot of ideas from E major scale, bringing out the 7, 6 and 3 of the scale.  He's also using E maj pentatonic a lot.

He's also implying maj 7 and 6  sounds (very "sweet").  (Emaj7, E6).   (Amaj7, A6).

If you want to dig in motre, a really cool way to get this sound, soloing, is to use the major pentatonic, rooted off the 5th of the chord.  So, use B maj pentatonic (= G# min pentatonic) against E triad.   

e:
b: 
g: 8   6  13  11
d: 6   6  11  11
a:          0   0
e: 0   0

   E       A

Also, spell out the chord tones of the maj7, mixed up with the pentatonic  (so, E triad:  mix up E maj7 chord tones with B maj pentatonic.  With A triad, mix up A maj7 chord tones with E maj pentatonic).  Double stops from the pentatonics are really nice also.

Try these E maj7 (ish) shapes .... 4th shape is 6add9, with 9 in bass.

e:
b: 4
g: 4  8  8  6
d: 6  6  6  6 
a: 6  6  9  9
e: 0  0  0  0

Notice how you can run G# min pentatonic (standard min pentatonic box shapes, starting at 4th fret) through this, to get a bluesy flavour, but end a lick on one of the above chord tones.

Shift these up 5 frets, when A triad comes along.

This is all basic harmony, but sounds beautiful.  Never heard of Tedeschi Trucks ... thanks for that.  I'm a sucker for that old soulful stuff (and most other music). 

You want to learn more, take a look at https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/redirect/post?p=34456276 and get involved.  Nothing to lose apart from a couple of hours of your time.  Lot to gain.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Apr 1, 2017,
#4
I notice a lot of playing with right hand fingers vs pick.

I notice in a couple that the guitar is playing "Indian violin" style... this is that sound of approaching a note by sliding and sort of jerking around the target before stopping at it, and it uses an unusual scale to Western ears. It is very characteristic of the way the violin is played in traditional Indian classical music.

Quote by reverb66
I'm pretty sure the Bible requires that you play through a tube amp in Texas.
Last edited by PlusPaul at Apr 2, 2017,