#2
something to note is that a guitarron does not have frets.

but yes, any instruments that are tuned to 12 tone equal temperament (which is the vast majority outside of middle eastern/african/asian instruments like the sitar) will use the same 12 notes in the same order. this is not just stringed instruments

judging by your limited understanding of western theory though, i'd just say it might be very hard for you to make a guitarron work for you, since it's essentially a fretless acoustic bass that will generally have no markers to guide you, so you have to use your ear for every single note you play.
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#3
Kind of a tricky question...

The technical answer is no, but the practical answer is yes.

The guitarron is a form of fretless acoustic bass.

For classical fretless strings (violin, viola, cello, double bass) the player is aware of slightly different fingering and pitch for enharmonic notes resulting from not adhering to the modern equal temperament. This means that the exact pitchs of notes are slightly adjusted by finger placement depending on the key of the music.

For some ancient "guitar-like" instruments with frets, the frets were movable, either by using cords tied around the neck as frets, or by mechanical means as in the frets of a sitar... and in both it might be common for there to be "missing frets" to skip notes that didn't occur in the music.

But in practical modern playing where all the frets are there, or for playing fretless in equal temperament, all the chromatic notes up the finger board are going to follow the same pattern of pitches.
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#5
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
like:
A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#
whatever the open string is that starts it off of course.
Yes.  That's the order of notes in western music on every instrument. Strings, piano, horns, everything.  What string instruments have in common is the visible pattern of the scale, in the sense that the octave is 1/2 way along the string, the 5th is 2/3 of the way (from the bridge), the 4th is 3/4, etc.  
Of course on a fretless instrument like the guitarron (as with violin, double bass etc), those positions are not marked, but they are still in the same places on the string.  That's just physics, as cdgraves says.

What makes the guitarron different from those other string instruments is the length of its fingerboard - it's less than an octave.  That's obvious just from looking at it, because it meets the body at less than half the string length.  So to get an octave above the open string, you'd need to stop the string over the body of the instrument.  I'm guessing that guitarron players rarely, if ever, need to do that, because it's a simple bass instrument
#6
Hail yes. i know. that's why i said fingerboard. but there is a special kind of tape made for fret-less instruments to put in place where the frets might be. you can use a tuner to help determine what each note is, then place the tape. but i could learn by ear with a guitarron. 
begginer geetarest.
#7
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
there is a special kind of tape made for fret-less instruments to put in place where the frets might be.

Only certain "frets", if you're talking about orchestral instrument tape. They correspond to diatonic notes relative to open strings (scale degrees 2, 3, and 4)

However, if you're playing Western music, you're going to be stuck with the 12 note names in that order no matter what
#8
Lloyd_rogers 
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
Hail yes. i know. that's why i said fingerboard. but there is a special kind of tape made for fret-less instruments to put in place where the frets might be. you can use a tuner to help determine what each note is, then place the tape. but i could learn by ear with a guitarron. 

That reminds of a lesson I once had with a jazz bass tutor/composer who demonstrated to us, by going through the cycle of 5ths on his double bass, how the note G# was in a different place from Ab.  I understood the principle (just intonation versus equal temperament), but his ear was way better than mine, so I took his word for it.
#9
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
like:
A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#
whatever the open string is that starts it off of course. 

i mainly would like to know if this is how a guitarron works.
here's a picture of one on this site. 
https://www.andrewsmusic.net/shoppingcart/categories/Mariachi/Guitarron/

but i am curious about all of the stringed instruments with a fingerboard. 


I actually play Violin, so i think I'm qualified to answer this question. As everyone has said so far, yes. With fretless instruments, you can do microtones much easier, though (which might be part of the point of a guitarron, IDK). With some stringed instruments, the order of strings is reversed. For violin, it goes like this (from deepest note to highest): GDAE; Cello and Viola go CGDA. Just thought that you might find that interesting.
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#10
Quote by gogiregion
IWith some stringed instruments, the order of strings is reversed. For violin, it goes like this (from deepest note to highest): GDAE; Cello and Viola go CGDA. Just thought that you might find that interesting.


this is because they're tuned in 5ths, compared to guitar which is tuned in 4ths (with a m3). this is basically arbitrary and rooted in the instruments' history, but functionally 5ths tuning increases your range from a given position compared to 4ths tuning. this sn't really an issue with guitar, which a) has more strings and b) is obligated to accommodate as many chords as possible with the least possible effort.
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#11
Quote by Hail
this is because they're tuned in 5ths, compared to guitar which is tuned in 4ths (with a m3). this is basically arbitrary and rooted in the instruments' history, but functionally 5ths tuning increases your range from a given position compared to 4ths tuning. this sn't really an issue with guitar, which a) has more strings and b) is obligated to accommodate as many chords as possible with the least possible effort.


And playing chords on a violin is a pain. Power chords are just a barred finger over two strings. But this is because of the fifths vs fourths.
Just a teenage girl who loves playing guitar way too much, if that's even possible.

I live for my girlfriend. <3
#12
seems like guitarron strings are impossible to buy in a store. at least in america. 
begginer geetarest.
#13
you might be able to find them if you have a high mexican population, most of the non-chain music stores in my neck of the woods are mexican-heavy, but even then, you're better off ordering them

that's true of pretty much any guitar )or bass) strings, though. it's not economical for a store to carry everything when they're better off just selling a couple select best-sellers and letting people order custom/more unique sets online wholesale
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#14
Quote by Lloyd_rogers
seems like guitarron strings are impossible to buy in a store. at least in america. 

I'm pretty sure you could use standard bass strings, or maybe baritone guitar strings. The lowest 3 are the same as bass guitar A-D-G - but of course the shorter scale length makes them more like strings E-A-D at 5th fret, so those gauges would be a better bet. 
The top 3 nylon strings are more of a challenge to match - maybe double bass strings would work there. Perhaps a bass D for the guitarron's C, and a G for the E.  The top A (being lower than the E and C, just a tone above the G string) could also be a double bass D.

Of course, this is all assuming this is an easier or cheaper option than ordering guitarron strings online...
Last edited by jonriley64 at May 17, 2017,
#15
jonriley64 but there is getting that full sound. i can hear the guitarron through the mix of an acoustic guitar and accordion, with nobody being plugged in. i noticed at this Mexican restaurant. 
if only acoustic basses could do that. 
begginer geetarest.