#1
I've recently bought a Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 because I wanted my computer/software to act as an amplifier. I've had a shit load of problems and I figured it might be best to seek help instead of returning it for being out of patience.

So after trying Guitar Rig and Bias, I decided to go with Reaper today. I downloaded some LePou VST Plugins too. I believe I have found the way to FX the sound, but I get crackling, see unwanted and annoying sounds.

The weird thing, and the thread's question is why do...

I get crackling when everywhere or in the Control Panel-Sound-Playback tab: http://imgur.com/a/CAa17
I stop getting crackling when I'm in the Control Panel-Sound-Recording tab: http://imgur.com/a/AbUrS

Here's the sound sample starting at 0:06: https://clyp.it/vko2gq0t

I'm aware this might be a computer/driver issue. 

If you have the knowledge to help me throughout this... please help me and thank you very much lol.
#2
I don't know if this helps but I had a Lexicon interface that always made a similar noise (only not quite that loud). I tried everything I could think of with no results so I bought a new Tascam interface. Same issue. In my home studio set up I run my powered monitors directly off the interface so just as a precaution I changed the normal Monster cables going to the monitors with TRS (Tip Ring Sleeve) cables. The problem was instantly solved. Noise gone. Just a thought.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 1, 2017,
#3
Quote by Rickholly74
I don't know if this helps but I had a Lexicon interface that always made a similar noise (only not quite that loud). I tried everything I could think of with no results so I bought a new Tascam interface. Same issue. In my home studio set up I run my powered monitors directly off the interface so just as a precaution I changed the cables going from my interface to the monitors going from normal cables to TRS (Tip Ring Sleeve) cables. The problem was instantly solved. Noise gone. Just a thought.

I might have misread, English isn't my mother tongue... I'm using a TS cable instead of TRS from my guitar to the audio interface - are you saying this COULD be the issue?
#4
It was in my case. I changed to TRS cables and my problem was solved. It might be a better ground or something. Might be worth a try.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#5
Rickholly74 Thanks mate, I'll give it a better look on what they say online on this matter. I might just go buy one and get a refund if it doesn't fix anything haha. Meanwhile, if someone has another answer to this, please share it with me.
#6
STEP 1 =  install the Scarlett drivers for your operating system ( see their website for latest version) - it appears you already did that.

STEP 2  = in Reaper,  UNDER PREFERENCES - AUDIO device ( or something like that)  - assign the Focusrite driver . Now test it. Set your device to 44.1 k in the Focusrite software and make sure your project in Reaper is also 44.1 k.

STEP 3 = if none of that works, contact Focusrite support - they will respond. 
#8
This sounds like a classic case of a buffer setting.  In short, your buffer is like a supply bucket that stores sound (for microseconds) between the input of your interface and your computer processor.  If your computer is very fast and efficient, and if you have really good drivers, you can get away with a teeny tiny bucket.  It will fill, albeit not much, but will not over-fill as the computer can keep up with the almost direct supply.  What is happening here, probably, is that the bucket is too small to handle the stream of data that it is receiving, and your system can't keep up with it all.   So, what happens, is that the bucket overflows and you spill some as you hurriedly try to get it to your processor.   That spilling is what is happening when you get dropouts or crackling.  

So, the solution is to set your buffer settings such that you have a larger buffer.  (this will usually be done in your DAW software.)  A bigger bucket will not overfill... but it will take longer to empty.  In other words, you will have what is called more "latency" - a delay between the time that the input signal is sent to the computer, and the time it is processed and spit back out of the computer.  This might be, but is by no means necessarily a big deal.  

Chris
 
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.